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How to use an automatic bleeder kit?

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Kerr Avatar
Kerr Platinum Member Norm Kerr
Ann Arbor, MI, USA   USA
"this sounds a lot like bleeding brakes method, but with the slave cylinder?"

Good question!

The answer is: you want the slave to be compressed all of the way so that the volume inside is minimum, so as you bleed the line you have the least chance of any air being caught inside of the slave cylinder while you do it.

Do note that with the clutch pedal down, and the slave fully compressed, the fluid will have a fair amount of pressure on it, so don't leave the bleed valve open too long or you'll squirt it all out, and run the risk of drawing some air in.

To best prevent the possibility of any air getting drawn in, is why you put the other end of the clear tube into a jar with some fluid in it (so the tube is always completely full of fluid the whole time).


N

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CarverBoldman Carver Boldman
Kirbyville, MO, USA   USA
So yeah, we decided to take a drive one day, and the clutch went straight to the floor. No pressure at all, so we replaced the (master?) cylinder and the slave cylinder, and now have to re-bleed it.

CarverBoldman Carver Boldman
Kirbyville, MO, USA   USA
I'm doing it today, right now. I'll get back to you guys soon.

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ajbowles Avatar
ajbowles Adrian Bowles
Westport, CT, USA   USA
The 1500 clutch is notoriously tough to bleed - besides the awkward placement of the bleeder valve on the SC, it's common to get air in the SC and/or in the high point of the hose where it leaves the MC. The first time I bled ours, I got the last of the air out by keeping pressure on the clutch pedal for a long time (the bubble eventually rises). Now I use a speed bleeder valve, but the vacuum kit you have should work - when I use the Mity Vac the 2nd person keeps the MC full from the top of the car as I pull the fluid and air out through the SC underneath. One day I'll probably break down and get the Eezibleeder - it just makes so much sense.

The one thing nobody asked is, why are you bleeding it? If you bleed it and get all the air out and still have no clutch, check the mechanical connections from the clutch pedal to the MC. Any free play will prevent you from moving the fluid - look at the clevis pin (see picture) and the MC pushrod. The 3rd pic is of the pedals - this is the view from underneath, but you will check it from above. the Clevis pin goes through the top of the pedal (hole shown with the green arrow) and connects the pedal to the pushrod on the MC. If the clevis pin is worn, or the holes in the pushrod are elongated, or the hole in the clutch pedal is worn, all the movement pressing the pedal will be for naught. It won't move the pushrod so the fluid won't flow.

Good luck - we've all been there.


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CarverBoldman Carver Boldman
Kirbyville, MO, USA   USA
OK, I honestly want to scream at the MG for a couple of reasons.

1. Everything is so dang squished together, making attaching the plastic hose to the bleeder valve IMPOSSIBLE!!

2. When you forget to where goggles and get gunk in your eyes, when you're already frustrated to the point of murder.

3. When you are missing out 70 degree weather and curvy roads because a pedal decides to slack of and not do his job.

4. When you realize you have absolutely no idea what you're supposed to be doing while you're squished under a car.

I need help guys.

How the heck am I supposed to attach the bleeder hose??? I have a pic of my dilemma below. Also, how to reach the the bleeder valve???


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CarverBoldman Carver Boldman
Kirbyville, MO, USA   USA
I'm glad you guys get to see my wonderful artwork.

ajbowles Avatar
ajbowles Adrian Bowles
Westport, CT, USA   USA
you're right about it being a cramped space, but it is positively cavernous compared to working on a new Mini.

Anyway, the hose just needs to go over the very end of the bleeder valve, so as long as the end of the hose is cut straight and the hose isn't too stiff, it should just slip on and you'll push it to be flush with the hex part. The higher you can get the car off the ground, the easier it is to do this. After 3 years of getting it just high enough on jack stands to constantly smack my head, I recently bought four 6-ton truck jack stands and now jobs like this seem much easier. When the car is just over your head, it is tougher to get the hose on - don't give up. The hard part is getting a wrench on that valve because there's no room to maneuver no matter how high you have the car. I use a stubby open ended wrench and swear often.

I'll be doing this on our 76 tomorrow afternoon - do you need pictures of anything? I probably won't get to it before 4pm Eastern, but PM me if you need anything as I won't be on the forum but I will be checking email.

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CarverBoldman Carver Boldman
Kirbyville, MO, USA   USA
Oh my gosh, a video or pictures would be AMAZING!!! I'm going to be in Florida for the next week, but you could either post them on the forum, or send them to my email, carverboldman@gmail.com that would be so amazing!!!

ngarman Avatar
ngarman nick garman
dayton ohio, USA   USA
below is what I did last time i had to bleed the clutch and seamed to work for me:

-Unbolt slave cylinder from transmission and compress slave cylinder all the way, secure with zip tie or wire
-find a tight fitting tube that will fit securely over the bleeder. you will need about 12-18"
- take a new container of brake fluid and remove the cap. drill a hole in the end of the cap that's ensures a extremely snug fit when you put the hose through.
-push hose through cap a good 6-8" and run a piece of electrical tape about 2" from the end just one or 2 times around. pull the hose back through. (the tape should prevent you from pulling it all the way back through and seal tube through hole in cap.)
-secure other end on bleeder, attach to new container of brake fluid and turn upside down.
-open bleeder and squeeze the container of brake fluid like the dickens. Once you cant squeeze anymore tighten the bleeder and take a break. repeat until the reservoirs full. don't let the brake fluid get low. I bought a big container to make sure I wouldn't run out while squeezing. You should see the fluid moving through tube and be able to see if any air is introduced.

pushing the fluid in from the bottom pushes all the air up and out. One thing I didn't do but I cant see hurting is fully depressing the clutch pedal when doing this?

I am not saying this is the best way or even recommended for that matter but it worked for me. I don't know if I got lucky or what but I was done in no time. It will help to have an assistant because you can overfill the reservoir quickly.

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MichaelV Avatar
MichaelV Michael Voelker
Pulaski, WI, USA   USA
I realize you invested in the Mitivac, but I would really suggest you buy an Eezibleed - get a knockoff one online for about $25. It turns the clutch bleeding into a one-person, 5-minute job. It seems that pushing fluid fast from the top gets the air bubbles out.

I've tried two-person pedal pumping (fail), pumping fluid from the bottom using an oil can (fail) and Mitivac (fail). The Mitivac doesn't work for me for anything, even brakes. The suction just seems to pull air around the bleeder screw.

For brakes, a simple hose in a jar with an inch of brake fluid, grease around the bleed screw to seal air leakage, crack the screw, pump the pedal till no air bubbles, done. Easy peasy and one person can even do it.

dlrhine Avatar
dlrhine Dave Rhine
South, Carolina, USA   USA
I totally agree with Michael...
I replaced my clutch hydraulics a few years back & messed around for several weeks trying everything but an Eezibleeder.
Purchased the Eezibleeder, bled & had a working clutch in less than a half hour start to finish.
rebuilt the brake hydraulics the next year & used it again.
Last winter I bled new fluid into both clutch & brake systems...easy, about an hour total time ( putting car in the air, bleeding & back on the ground).
For me, the Eezibleeder was the way to go.
Good Luck



If it ain't broke, I'll fix it 'til it is! winking smiley

Kerr Avatar
Kerr Platinum Member Norm Kerr
Ann Arbor, MI, USA   USA
by the way, no need to buy an Ezibleeder, you can make your own for about $20

In any case, you will need a spare master cylinder cap that you can drill and fit the tube to (once you've bought a spare cap and made one of these you can re use it for ever).

Here are some links to how easy it is to make your own:





http://faculty.ccp.edu/faculty/dreed/Campingart/jettatech/bleeder/index.htm

http://www.ibmwr.org/ktech/pressure-bleeder/bleeder.shtml


Norm

ajbowles Avatar
ajbowles Adrian Bowles
Westport, CT, USA   USA
Apparently I wasn't destined to bleed anything today. Maybe Sunday so that my son can go to work on Monday.


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