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How to use an automatic bleeder kit?

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littlecars Avatar
littlecars David Bassett
Nashville, TN, USA   USA
1965 Chevrolet Corvair "Ski Team Transport SOLD!"
1965 MG Midget MkII "Buffoon"
1966 MG Midget MkII "Swiss Cheese...SCRAPPED"
1970 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Tamara's Turd... SOLD!!!"    & more
Are you working through a hole or from under the car? The bleeder looks like a domed nut with a hole on the end of it. When you get a wrench around it, you DON'T have to loosen it very far for fluid to begin to flow. Not a screw to be found anywhere near the slave.

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dimini Avatar
dimini Don Ipock
Kansas City, MO, USA   USA
With a 2-person method, one person sits in the car and pumps the pedal vigorously while the other person is underneath and is opening and closing the bleed valve on the slave cylinder.

1) make sure you have fluid topped off in the resevoir and keep an eye on it because it's a small reservoir and you can easily pump the reservoir dry and introduce more air into the system.

2) have the person pump vigorously 3-4 times and hold the pedal to the floor. While the pedal is held to the floor, the 2nd person cracks open the valve on the slave cylinder beneath the car to expel air & fluid. It might take 5 or 6 attempts at this before any pedal is felt. What I mean by that is, you may have to repeat the vigorous pump & hold process numerous times before it starts to build up some pressure in the system.

3) Once there is some clutch pressure felt, each time you crack open the bleeder valve, the clutch will quickly slam to the floor--don't panic, this is normal. Just close the valve while the person in the car continues to hold the pedal to the floor. Don't release the foot off the pedal until the valve is closed again, otherwise that will suck air back up through the system from the bottom side.

Hope this helps!

refisk Avatar
refisk Rick Fisk
Frankenmuth, MI, USA   USA
The shiny silver thing on the right hand end in this photo is the bleeder valve.

In reply to # 3737288 by CarverBoldman OK guys, I can do Bodywork restoring, but my knowledge of engine and line/stuff is zilch. You're going to have to explain it like you're talking to a 5 year old! So what does the bleeder valve look like?

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Wayne Burner Avatar
Chester, NH, USA   USA
I would have my attractive assistant help me, if I were youthumbs up

dimini Avatar
dimini Don Ipock
Kansas City, MO, USA   USA
What you don't see in the photo that Rick posted in #18, is that the clutch line attaches next to the bleeder valve, and when in place, tucked way up inside the darned driveshaft tunnel, it's nearly impossible to get a wrench of any sort onto the bleed valve, not to mention a catch hose for the fluid on the end of the valve...

During my one-year ownership this is the least favorite aspect of playing with the Midget 1500.

CarverBoldman Carver Boldman
Kirbyville, MO, USA   USA
ok.let me repeat this in my own words to make sure its right.

Method 1. (with pump) Get underneath the MG, and take of the line that is attached to the slave cylinder, then attach the tightest tube on the piece that the previous line was on. Attach the end of the line to the cup thing. Then, fit another line onto the end of the pump, and fit the other end onto the other end of the cup. Then proceed to pump until the air bubbles stop coming.

Method 2. (2 person method) Have one person in the MG pump the pedal to the floor about 3-4 times then hold to the ground. While the pedal is being held, unscrew the bleeder valve, to let out the fluid/hopefully bubbles. Repeat until pressure is gained in the clutch pedal.

IS THIS RIGHT?

dimini Avatar
dimini Don Ipock
Kansas City, MO, USA   USA
In reply to # 3737304 by CarverBoldman ok.let me repeat this in my own words to make sure its right.

Method 1. (with pump) Get underneath the MG, and take of the line that is attached to the slave cylinder, then attach the tightest tube on the piece that the previous line was on. Attach the end of the line to the cup thing. Then, fit another line onto the end of the pump, and fit the other end onto the other end of the cup. Then proceed to pump until the air bubbles stop coming.

Method 2. (2 person method) Have one person in the MG pump the pedal to the floor about 3-4 times then hold to the ground. While the pedal is being held, unscrew the bleeder valve, to let out the fluid/hopefully bubbles. Repeat until pressure is gained in the clutch pedal.

IS THIS RIGHT?

Method 1? No. Don't disconnect the hydraulic line connected to the slave cylinder. Attach the vacuum bleeder's hose fitting to the slave cylinder bleed valve, which is located next to the line. Rick's photo of the slave cylinder, posted in #18, clearly shows/identifies the beed valve on the end of the cylinder. The tricky part is that the bleed valve and the clutch hydraulic line fitting are so close together. It's difficult to reach when you are under the car looking up through the impaired space. You'll know what I mean once you are underneath looking up.

Method 2? Yes. I suggest looking at a couple of youtube videos on 2 person bleed method. I really think this is the likely method for success on the clutch. Oh, there is most likely a little rubber boot over the bleed valve that keeps out all the crud that you'll soon find when you look at your car's bottom side. If it hasn't been touched in a few thousand miles, it may well be camouflaged under 1/4" of grime.

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CarverBoldman Carver Boldman
Kirbyville, MO, USA   USA
OK, what I'm seeing in Ricks photo is a chrome tube sticking out, and a black cap on something. Is the chrome tube where you attach the hose?

Kerr Avatar
Kerr Platinum Member Norm Kerr
Ann Arbor, MI, USA   USA
No, you remove the black rubber cap and put the hose on that.


Also, no one has mentioned a key step that is necessary for the two person method to work: your helper holds the pedal down while you crack the bleeder. They do NOT allow the pedal to lift up AT ALL until you close the bleeder and call up to them a signal, like "OK". Only at that time do they let the pedal rise and then the two of you repeat the steps. Do the steps as many times as it takes to see clean fluid with no bubbles in it, coming out and going through the clear tube.

Don't forget to keep checking the level in the master cylinder because if you let it run dry you must start all over again.


N

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CarverBoldman Carver Boldman
Kirbyville, MO, USA   USA
Got it. So for the pump method, place the hose on the valve that has a cap on it, and do the whole process.
and don't lift pedal until a signal is given!

dimini Avatar
dimini Don Ipock
Kansas City, MO, USA   USA
In reply to # 3737315 by CarverBoldman OK, what I'm seeing in Ricks photo is a chrome tube sticking out, and a black cap on something. Is the chrome tube where you attach the hose?

Yes, in that photo, the chrome colored end is the bleeder valve, which on your car, may hide beneath a little rubber dust/grime cover. Also in that photo is a black rubber cover next to the bleed valve. That's the cover you will find on new slave cylinders still in the box. That cover is removed, thrown away and the hydraulic line is attached there.

Carver- you are getting closer on the 2 person technique. The person who pumps the pedal, needs to remain there and pumps rapidly 3-4 times, and holds the pedal to the floor as you open the valve underneath, and quickly closes it. Once you have it closed, you call out to the person to do another round of 3-4 rapid, vigorous pumps who then holds it to floor again until you crack open the valve to release fluid & trapped air, and then close the valve. It's a 3-4 rapid pump, hold to floor, open the valve, then close the valve, then repeat process between the two of you. Eventually, the person pumping the pedal will feel the clutch beginning to work.

CarverBoldman Carver Boldman
Kirbyville, MO, USA   USA
ok, so this sounds a lot like bleeding brakes method, but with the slave cylinder?

Wayne Burner Avatar
Chester, NH, USA   USA
Perzacklysmoking smiley

CarverBoldman Carver Boldman
Kirbyville, MO, USA   USA
Awesome. Thanks so much guys! I'm going to try this as soon as possible!!

dlrhine Avatar
dlrhine Dave Rhine
South, Carolina, USA   USA
Just curious, but what prompted you to bleed the clutch in the first place?
What problems were you having?



If it ain't broke, I'll fix it 'til it is! winking smiley

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