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steering wheel rubs on cowl

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dogeddie Avatar
dogeddie Silver Member Andy L
Kaukauna, WI, USA   USA
Before I took the steering wheel off today to make re installing the radio console assembly easier, everything was fine. I tried using John Twist' method of removing the steering wheel in this video, but it didn't work.

So I came up with a home made puller that got it off with a plate and a couple clamps. Problem is, now the steering wheel rubs hard on the cowl plastic, and if I had to get to 37 foot pounds, I'd worry about cracking it. The wheel seems to slide way too far onto the shaft. Cowl bolts are in correctly. Is there a reason this is happening that anyone can think of? I don't know if the Twist method would've caused a problem, but I just don't see it. Thanks



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-04-08 02:24 PM by dogeddie.

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dogeddie Avatar
dogeddie Silver Member Andy L
Kaukauna, WI, USA   USA
Here are a couple pics.


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CRH Charley H
Prospect, KY, USA   USA
Andy,

I am not sure this applies to a Midget of your year, but I suspect it does. I know it applies to certain years of the MGB. I suspect you have a collapsible steering column, and it likely uses a sort of plastic shear pin to connect the two sections. Notice in John Twist’s video that he is using both knees and one arm to pull the steering wheel towards himself while the assistant whacks with the hammer. If you don’t pull hard enough toward you with the wheel and column, you risk breaking the shear pin in the column when you hit it with the hammer.

Wait to see if what I’m saying is verified by anyone else before you do anything because I am not sure of the years and models affected.

Charley

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76lucas Avatar
76lucas Gold Member Josh L
Floyd, VA, USA   USA
1978 MG Midget 1500
1979 MG Midget 1500 "Parts Car"
From what I can tell 68 was the first year for the collapsible columns. There are ways to fix it but opinions differ on which is the better. /www.mgexp.com/phorum/read.php?3,3029453,3029846#msg-3029846



If you never try to do it You will never be able to do it



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-04-08 04:04 PM by 76lucas.

dogeddie Avatar
dogeddie Silver Member Andy L
Kaukauna, WI, USA   USA
Thanks. To my limited knowledge it doesn't look collapsible?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-04-08 04:35 PM by dogeddie.


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refisk Avatar
refisk Rick Fisk
Frankenmuth, MI, USA   USA
Andy,

That is definitely a collapsible column.

In reply to # 3713174 by dogeddie Thanks. To my limited knowledge it doesn't look collapsible?

1974MGMidget Avatar
1974MGMidget Silver Member Jack Orkin
Grayson, GA, USA   USA
The main collapsible part is under the dash and its covered with a round metal cover and is much bigger than the steering shaft. If you look at the part in the engine bay, the top part is larger than the lower part so it will slide down on it upon impact. There is a plastic pin(s?) holding them together that will shear on impact. The flattened portion of the upper shaft on mine has two round imprints a little smaller in diameter than a pencil eraser which I guess are the pins? I didn't think they were that big, so I'm not positive about that. I guess you could measure from the junction to the steering rack and compare to another to see if it has slipped. I have no idea how much of a hammer blow you would need to break the pins. Hmmm, so, I could gain an inch of arm room by hammering my steering shaft to break the pins and collapse it? Then just drill a new hole through it and install a new plastic pin? confused smiley

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dogeddie Avatar
dogeddie Silver Member Andy L
Kaukauna, WI, USA   USA
So do I have to pull the steering column out to do this fix? This is very frustrating as I thought Mr Twist' method would be trouble free. I really don't have any idea where to start on this. For the love of Sweet Jesus, don't tell me I gotta take that plastic cowl and all that crap off again. That was very frustrating. And I just got all the blinkers and everything working again. sad smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-04-08 05:46 PM by dogeddie.

CRH Charley H
Prospect, KY, USA   USA
Andy,

Did you in fact follow Mr. Twist's instructions correctly? That is, did you use two hammers, two people, two knees, and one arm as demonstrated in the video? Even if you did, it is hard to show the detail about exactly how to use a hammer correctly.

I have a vague recollection of doing a fix for the broken plastic shear pin by using a hot glue gun. I suspect it does require disassembly to do it. You could try a search in the archives.

Charley

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1974MGMidget Avatar
1974MGMidget Silver Member Jack Orkin
Grayson, GA, USA   USA
Before you even think about pulling all that stuff out again, try to make sure of your diagnosis. Try to measure the length of the shaft in situ. I just measured mine and forgot by the time I got upstairs. I think it was 10" from the end of the column to the upper shaft. I've never dealt with a steering column, but if it has, in fact, collapsed a little due to hammering, maybe you could use a hammer and chisel/punch on the lip where the upper shaft sits over the lower shaft and gently tap it up. Then drill a hole through and fix it with hot glue or plastic pin or maybe soft copper pin. If it did collapse, it may be only an inch or less. (I'm just thinking out loud here, I have no experience with this.)

dogeddie Avatar
dogeddie Silver Member Andy L
Kaukauna, WI, USA   USA
Yes, I'd really rather not go through all that. Putting the console in was the last thing I planned on doing for now - just waiting for Spring and it is ready to go. If the shear pin did break, it would still steer normally? Also, how many threads do most of you have showing past the steering wheel nut when it is tight? Because if the whole shaft sunk, that wouldn't change, right? It seems like I have 3-4 threads past now, maybe seems like more than I used to have. It really just seems like the steering wheel shaft slips too far onto the steering column.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-04-08 10:34 PM by dogeddie.

bev sleet Avatar
bev sleet Bev S
Raunds, Northamptonshire, UK   GBR
Andy you know the lip on the cowl fits inside the steering wheel boss ?

dogeddie Avatar
dogeddie Silver Member Andy L
Kaukauna, WI, USA   USA
This is what I have right now if anyone has one in a similar state to check. I do realize the cowl lip sits in the steering wheel boss - thanks



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-04-09 07:20 AM by dogeddie.


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S1 Elan Kurt. Appley
Akron, Ia., USA   USA
I have drilled a collapsed one and use a small roll pin. Won't save you in a crash anymore but will do the job. You have a collapsible outer tube as well that I remember dealing with but don't remember exactly what I did with it.

Kurt

CRH Charley H
Prospect, KY, USA   USA
Andy,

In the library drop down menu above is a Tech section. In that, I think under the wheels & suspension section, is an article about the MGB collapsible column. I don't know if they are the same as a Midget, but I suspect they are similar.

https://www.mgexp.com/article/easy-mgb-steering-column-repair.html

Does anyone know, when the shear pin is broken, would the inner column be free to pull out and push in? I would expect so, but maybe the fit is too stiff.

Charley

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