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Bugeye Turbo project

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autocomman mark w
lost angy, USA   USA
Dont need to do anything for boost reference on the HIF44 and the stock metro turbo plenum. Its got all the holes and ports to boost reference the float bowl, the fuel pressure regulator, dashpot etc etc. The only thing was the restrictor into the carb, Has to do with the dashpot slamming all the way up..ill have to find the articles I was reading on it

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lukesky36 Avatar
lukesky36 Luke W
Kennerdell, PA, USA   USA
if your not doing a pull through system its probably a good idea to get a a/f ratio gauge and install it the last thing you want to do is to burn your pistons then you will have a much bigger project then you thought just don't let it lean out

autocomman mark w
lost angy, USA   USA
Yeah Im gonna weld in an O2 bung so it can be setup proeprly. Im not gonna run much boost on this motor. With the stock 4 ring pistons I dunno what it will hold up to, and I dont wanna break it. The long term plam is finish the proof of conecpt for lack of a better term. Get proper pistons on standby at some point. And When I have the $$ to pull the car apart for final paint and body, go through the motor and do it up fresh.

So I did finish the exhaust minus hangers. Came out ok. Im not super happy with it. Welds need a lot of cleaning up but I feel like its too low. Its not easy to get it all sitting just right in there. Every time I tighten the 3 bolt flange on teh turbo after pulling it out welding and stuffing it back in things tend to move in a differernt spot. Im just not sure how close to the floor I should go. WIth it under the axle it looks like its just hanging way to low, but I can only go up maybe 3/4 of an inch. I want to do a proper air gap heat shield too, 1/4" off the floor most likey, or 3/16 to keep it from roasting me. Thoughts on floor clearance?

Didnt get to the fuel line either, but got the air filter in. Funny thing is the intake track was the easist thing. Also got the cooling system planned out, just gotta order a few more litlte hoses. Feeds the turbo from the block drain, returns to the thermostat housing via a sandwich, hosing is easy enough.


















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halloween Gregg B
Sheridan, WY, USA   USA
I have a question for my future EFI plans on my Sprite. Regarding the coolant sensor, I have already plumbed one in between the head and the heater valve, which, as per your post, would not work properly, unless the heater valve was open??? Could I remedy that by plumbing (say a quarter inch line) bypass line between the sensor location that returns to the heater return hose? To help clarify my question, what I have is a tee at the back of the head, with the sensor in one port and the other port goes to a solenoid valve mounted on the heater core inlet. Do I need a bypass hose from the head, past the sensor, but before the heater valve, to the return heater hose to insure that the sensor is getting the correct input when the heater solenoid valve is closed, or is the coolant temp at the back of the head close enough? Sorry for the lengthy question, but putting it into words apparently isn't my strong suit.
Thanks,
Gregg

Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, NM, USA   USA
In reply to # 3687194 by halloween I have a question for my future EFI plans on my Sprite. Regarding the coolant sensor, I have already plumbed one in between the head and the heater valve, which, as per your post, would not work properly, unless the heater valve was open??? Could I remedy that by plumbing (say a quarter inch line) bypass line between the sensor location that returns to the heater return hose? To help clarify my question, what I have is a tee at the back of the head, with the sensor in one port and the other port goes to a solenoid valve mounted on the heater core inlet. Do I need a bypass hose from the head, past the sensor, but before the heater valve, to the return heater hose to insure that the sensor is getting the correct input when the heater solenoid valve is closed, or is the coolant temp at the back of the head close enough? Sorry for the lengthy question, but putting it into words apparently isn't my strong suit.
Thanks,
Gregg

Gregg,

I'll be interested to hear Mark's response. In my DIY EFI project (different thread on this forum), I put mine in the place where the OEM gauge sensor goes--toward the front of the head--and recommend people relocate that sensor either in the radiator (some radiator's have a bung) or in the top hose downstream of the thermostat.

That said, I've got a simple test for your setup. Just get an in expensive infrared thermometer (like the $21 Etekcity model on Amazon, etc.) and compare readings at your tee--assuming it's metal--with: (i) the gauge reading, if you don't want to simply put the sensor in the head, I as recommend; and (ii) a readings of the head's cast iron at three or four points along its length--immediately at the base of the heater tap or tee in your case; 1/3 of the way forward; 2/3; and again where the OEM sensor screws in.

You'll find out pretty quickly with empirical evidence whether the water temp rises evenly enough, notwithstanding the relative remoteness of your chosen sensor location. Remember, too, that if I understand your location, it may be the highest point of the uninterrupted body of water confined to the head with the tap and thermo closed. Heat rises, even within water, as any diver or ocean swimmer (like this one) will tell you.

Joel


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autocomman mark w
lost angy, USA   USA
Biggest thing is that it's put in a place where water always circulates. The head where the temp gauge is, that's the best place. There is a factory sandwhich plate used on the fuel injected classic minis that has a 12mm threaded port for the ECT. It goes between the thermostat and the head. Far as the temp sensor for the gauge, relocate to the radiator. I don't know how much circulation the radiator gets when the thermostat is closed, so I would be hesitant to out the ECT in the radiator because of that. Really it's gotta just he where there is circulation. That's why the heater hose or upper hoses are not a good place.

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Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, NM, USA   USA
In reply to # 3687643 by autocomman Biggest thing is that it's put in a place where water always circulates. The head where the temp gauge is, that's the best place. There is a factory sandwhich plate used on the fuel injected classic minis that has a 12mm threaded port for the ECT. It goes between the thermostat and the head. Far as the temp sensor for the gauge, relocate to the radiator. I don't know how much circulation the radiator gets when the thermostat is closed, so I would be hesitant to out the ECT in the radiator because of that. Really it's gotta just he where there is circulation. That's why the heater hose or upper hoses are not a good place.

Mark,

Hey, I didn't know about those sandwich plates - great tip! In fact, if they aren't available, I'll just design one and have a dozen or so CNC machined. Mine would be designed to receive a standard GM temp sensor, since that's what my EFI system uses, and they will work with Megasquirt, et al., too.

Here is the number: 114-230, no longer available.

Well, the other thing is I wonder whether such a plate would lift the thermo housing sufficiently to cause clearance problems with the Spridget's bonnet. I'll have to do a clearance check... but neat idea.

Joel



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-02-26 04:03 PM by Yankeedriver.


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Chas 906 Avatar
Chas 906 Chuck Peterson
Iron Mountain, MI, USA   USA
1961 MG Midget MkI "Little Red Rider"
Be sure to pre heat 200-300 deg. prior to tigging. Will help to purge some of the crud. Then cover with a welding blanket to slowly cool or the cast iron will crack.

halloween Gregg B
Sheridan, WY, USA   USA
Wow!

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Chas 906 Avatar
Chas 906 Chuck Peterson
Iron Mountain, MI, USA   USA
1961 MG Midget MkI "Little Red Rider"
Gregg, it's not that big of a deal to pre heat and post cool cast iron. If your familiar with welding, you know that there are certain materials that need a pre heat. Cast iron and any high carbon steels need a 300+ degree pre heat to move the carbon molecules around so they are dispersed prior to striking an arc. There are temp sticks that are used that melt when put to the pre heated metals prior to welding or tigging. Any welding shop or welding supply company has them. They come in a variety of temperatures. Then the same process in reverse is done to give the material a chance to slow cool. That's what the blanket is used for. Wrap the part as best you can and let it cool down over night. After the post cool down wire brush the weld and do a visual inspection. This should let you know if the part is free of cracks. Or if you have a welding shop that has the NDT (non destructive testing) equipment to assure there are no post cooling cracks. Magnetic particle (MT) or liquid penetrant (LP) are two ways to check welds for any cracks. If you do the pre heat and post cooling you should be ok. Just be sure to pre clean the part the best you can. Both before the pre heat and after. Cast iron is a dirty material and is very porous, Meaning, it absorbs a lot of oil and crap.

autocomman mark w
lost angy, USA   USA
The plates are avaiable. I just bought one from usaminisport like 3 months ago.

https://usa.minisport.com/peg100030-thermostat-sandwich-plate-mpi-12mm-threaded-hole.html

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Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, NM, USA   USA
In reply to # 3688506 by autocomman The plates are avaiable. I just bought one from usaminisport like 3 months ago.

https://usa.minisport.com/peg100030-thermostat-sandwich-plate-mpi-12mm-threaded-hole.html

Hey, Mark, you're a wealth of information.

Assuming this doesn't raise the thermo housing too high and contact the Spridget hood, this solves a big PITA for my DIY EFI system.

Thank you!

Joel


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autocomman mark w
lost angy, USA   USA
Just beware its 12mm, I dont know the thread pitch off hand but its where the EFI mini put its ECT. Also how did we start talking about welding cast iron?? What did I miss haha

Chas 906 Avatar
Chas 906 Chuck Peterson
Iron Mountain, MI, USA   USA
1961 MG Midget MkI "Little Red Rider"
Sorry that's my bad! Thought the material was cast.

Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, NM, USA   USA
In reply to # 3690103 by autocomman Just beware its 12mm, I dont know the thread pitch off hand but its where the EFI mini put its ECT. Also how did we start talking about welding cast iron?? What did I miss haha

Yeah, thanks--considerably smaller than the GM sensor I was planning on using.

Also, Minisport's website says this sensor controls the electric fan. What I don't know is: (i) whether, like the GM Skyhawk/Cavalier ECU I'm using on my DIY EFI project, the same sensor both informs the Mini ECU's warmup circuit and its signal to the fan relay (some cars use separate sensors); and (ii) regardless, whether its resistance curve mimicks that of the GM. What I may do is just get a sensor and run a side-by-side resistance test to see if they're similar.

However, even if they aren't compatible curves, one could simply plug the threaded hole and put a hose on the barb, and run that to an NPT barb adapter that would fit the GM sensor.

But even better? I am 90% sure I could have the thermo plate adapters CNC-machined without the unnecessary hose barb and with the proper NPT thread for the GM sensor, and sell them for less than $70.69. My 6061-T6 SU HIF44 adapters use a bigger billet than this would need, they require more operations and cost less than this casting.

A corollary benefit would be simplifying a clearance issue on my DIY supercharger kit for those with vertical radiators.

Of course, all of this would require that the raised thermo housing didn't hit the Sridget bonnet. I'll try a clearance test after running errands today and we'll see what's what.

Joel


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