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What did you do with your MG Midget today?

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jimbvd Platinum Member Jim Bravard
Hopkinsville, Ky., USA   USA
Michael, I'm not sure I understand what you're meaning. It was installed on the opposite side to the engine on the carburetor body. It was also capped off, it had no function when I got the car. If it were to replace the PVC system, wouldn't it be connected to something? jim

In reply to # 3680855 by Colonel musturd 79 That fitting installed in your intake is a modification to replace the pcv system that was removed when your car was converted to a Weber.

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Irish1979MG Pete Emmert
Indianapolis, IN, USA   USA
I just bought this midget about 6 weeks ago and had no idea how much fun it is to actually work on it. My new 71 GMC C1500 is a little more of a fight. Thanks to all the great advice on the forums here I have made a ton of progress.

Today I fixed my reverse switch which I found was disconnected when I went to fill my gearbox through the shifter hole. I have a 79 midget and apparently you can't actually fill your gearbox that way. Oh well that is the only way I would have found the issue with the roached reverse switch being disconnected. Now I have a new switch all connected and the lights work when I lift it into reverse.

Foresten Avatar
Foresten Foresten Williams
Oviedo, FL, USA   USA
Took mine to campus with me on valentines day and handed out flowers and rides between my classes.
Always turns heads, Go Knights!

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MiniCobra Avatar
MiniCobra Mike B
Weatherford, TX, USA   USA
1973 MG Midget Conversion "Mini Cobra"
1998 Dodge Dakota Pickup "Dak"
2006 Nissan 350Z Roadster "Rose-Z"
In reply to # 3680734 by jimbvd Somehow I missed Philip and Eric's comments. I tuned it myself, but wasn't really sure I had done the correct procedure, as it still was not running right. I took it to a fella that timed it for me when I first bought the car a couple of times, so I'm pretty sure that's correct.

There is a piece threaded to the carb and hose barb on the other end down low on the carburetor body. I don't know why it's there or what purpose it was to have served. I'll attach a picture of it. Whoever put it on, had put a rubber cap over the hose barb end. I accidentally knocked that off one time and the car ran really high RPMs. That's why I was feeling that it probably would be a vacuum leak. jim

I took that brass piece out and I'm going by the auto parts place to get a plug for it. That way that will eliminate any possible air sucking into that point.

In reply to # 3680727 by MiniCobra
In reply to # 3680720 by jimbvd Sorry about the mix up. Yes 1800 RPM, not good at typing and didn't proofread very well. It is also a Weber carb. Came on the car when bought. Have sourced almost everything for conversion back to SU carbs, but won't do that til I retire next year.
Thanks for the input, though. I have always been mechanically oriented, just never cared about working on cars til I bought the midget. jim

I had a weber on my 78 Fiat X1/9. I would check to make sure the throttle plate is closed all the way , not loose on the shaft and the throttle shaft is not worn and loose in its bore as well as checking for vacuum leaks.

Jim,

Don't know if you solved your problem but here are some other thoughts. After everything else I did I still had a bit of a flat spot off idle so I decided to check my accelerator discharge nozzle size by removing it. It looked a bit small to me based on everything I read so I made plans to go to Summit and buy a larger one. Then I saw something about checking PCV valve operation, so I ran a check on it. Afterwards I start the engine and response is perfect , confirmed by a road test. So either I dislodged something blocking the discharge nozzle or the PCV valve.

Anyway I thought the PCV valve could be your issue as well and thought I should pass it on. Below is a PCV valve discussion I thought you might be interested in.

http://www.mgexp.com/phorum/read.php?3,3105181

Mike

jimbvd Platinum Member Jim Bravard
Hopkinsville, Ky., USA   USA
Thanks, Mike. I didn't mean to disengage. We made a hasty trip to Cleveland Wednesday for my father in law's funeral.

We'll be home sometime tomorrow. I'll check these suggestions Sunday afternoon or Monday. I'm not sure the info you just sent will be appropriate, as mine is a 1973 with a 1275 engine and Weber carb, but I'll reread the info and check it out. Thanks again. I'll be sure to let ya'll know what I find. jim

In reply to # 3682486 by MiniCobra
In reply to # 3680734 by jimbvd Somehow I missed Philip and Eric's comments. I tuned it myself, but wasn't really sure I had done the correct procedure, as it still was not running right. I took it to a fella that timed it for me when I first bought the car a couple of times, so I'm pretty sure that's correct.

There is a piece threaded to the carb and hose barb on the other end down low on the carburetor body. I don't know why it's there or what purpose it was to have served. I'll attach a picture of it. Whoever put it on, had put a rubber cap over the hose barb end. I accidentally knocked that off one time and the car ran really high RPMs. That's why I was feeling that it probably would be a vacuum leak. jim

I took that brass piece out and I'm going by the auto parts place to get a plug for it. That way that will eliminate any possible air sucking into that point.

In reply to # 3680727 by MiniCobra
In reply to # 3680720 by jimbvd Sorry about the mix up. Yes 1800 RPM, not good at typing and didn't proofread very well. It is also a Weber carb. Came on the car when bought. Have sourced almost everything for conversion back to SU carbs, but won't do that til I retire next year.
Thanks for the input, though. I have always been mechanically oriented, just never cared about working on cars til I bought the midget. jim

I had a weber on my 78 Fiat X1/9. I would check to make sure the throttle plate is closed all the way , not loose on the shaft and the throttle shaft is not worn and loose in its bore as well as checking for vacuum leaks.

Jim,

Don't know if you solved your problem but here are some other thoughts. After everything else I did I still had a bit of a flat spot off idle so I decided to check my accelerator discharge nozzle size by removing it. It looked a bit small to me based on everything I read so I made plans to go to Summit and buy a larger one. Then I saw something about checking PCV valve operation, so I ran a check on it. Afterwards I start the engine and response is perfect , confirmed by a road test. So either I dislodged something blocking the discharge nozzle or the PCV valve.

Anyway I thought the PCV valve could be your issue as well and thought I should pass it on. Below is a PCV valve discussion I thought you might be interested in.

http://www.mgexp.com/phorum/read.php?3,3105181

Mike

Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, NM, USA   USA
In reply to # 3682295 by Irish1979MG I just bought this midget about 6 weeks ago and had no idea how much fun it is to actually work on it. My new 71 GMC C1500 is a little more of a fight. Thanks to all the great advice on the forums here I have made a ton of progress.

Today I fixed my reverse switch which I found was disconnected when I went to fill my gearbox through the shifter hole. I have a 79 midget and apparently you can't actually fill your gearbox that way. Oh well that is the only way I would have found the issue with the roached reverse switch being disconnected. Now I have a new switch all connected and the lights work when I lift it into reverse.

Pete,

Welome! They are fun to work on.

I have to say backup lights are serious high-tech for a '67 owner like me. I have the Datsun 5-speed conversion, and didn't even think about seeing whether I could use the swtich on that tranny in combination with add-on lights or something. My old '65 VW Beetle had add-on chrome back-up lights that clamped onto the bumper... maybe I could use them on the '67 Midget?

Joel


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66jalopy Avatar
66jalopy Silver Member Phillip Jolliffe
Lake City, FL, USA   USA
Never did Figure out why most back up lights are useless to see back. Put a real light back there.

Colonel musturd 79 Avatar
Colonel musturd 79 Michael McKinney
Winchester, VA, USA   USA
1978 MG Midget 1500 "Colonel Mustard"
1987 Pontiac Fiero "SILVER BULLET"
Jim, when a MG is changed to a Weber carb there is no vacuum source for the PCV system so many owners will drill and tap the intake for a fitting to provide a source of manifold vacuum. If it is no longer needed it can simply be plugged.



Amore della Strada
For the love of the road

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jimbvd Platinum Member Jim Bravard
Hopkinsville, Ky., USA   USA
That must have been the case, but what would cause it to no longer be needed? jim

In reply to # 3683054 by Colonel musturd 79 Jim, when a MG is changed to a Weber carb there is no vacuum source for the PCV system so many owners will drill and tap the intake for a fitting to provide a source of manifold vacuum. If it is no longer needed it can simply be plugged.

thebeav55 Paul W
Tonawanda, NY, USA   USA
Oddly enough, my '76, with the original OPUS distributor, has never had a vacuum advance line connected to it.
It runs like a champ !

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Papyrichard Avatar
Papyrichard Richard Yves
Waterloo, Belgium, Belgium   BEL
I checked brakes, water and oil leves, as well as tyres pressure and accu : all of these seem ok. Just missing spring and sun in order to do first outing ..

Colonel musturd 79 Avatar
Colonel musturd 79 Michael McKinney
Winchester, VA, USA   USA
1978 MG Midget 1500 "Colonel Mustard"
1987 Pontiac Fiero "SILVER BULLET"
The need for positive crankcase ventilation is to relieve crank case pressure caused by engine blow by which will cause gasket failures and oil leaks. The system that is used by some to some success, is where the valve cover is vented to the base of the air cleaner. This is not satisfactory for all situations. Then some owners have designed their own system. They drilled and taped the intake manifold, and installed a hose to the valve cover with a fixed orifice to meter vacuum and remove the crank case pressure.



Amore della Strada
For the love of the road

djclinton Avatar
djclinton Dennis Clinton
Mesquite, NV, USA   USA
1964 Ford Ranchero "Red Rocket"
1966 Other Custom "Green Machine"
1979 MG Midget 1500 "Bridgette(brown Midget)"
Took the cars out of the garage for their 'Spring Wash' today. Bridget didn't want to go back in, so went 'touring' through town for about 30 miles. We both enjoyed the trip. I love it when the guy with the BIG decked out truck rolls his window down to ask what I am driving. Always fun, always lots of looks.


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jimbvd Platinum Member Jim Bravard
Hopkinsville, Ky., USA   USA
Mike, apparently someone, when they changed to the Weber, did what you said and drilled at the base of the carburetor. I'm guessing they (or another owner) then plugged that off and vented off of the rocker cover to the base of the air cleaner. That was also attached to a hose going down to a little canister next to the pulley. I took that set of lines off, checked it, made sure they were clean and open, tightened it up, put new clamps on, and tightened them as best I could. I plugged the large hole where the hose barb was.
I also finished cleaning the carburetor that I had rebuilt, cleaned the venturis and the emulsion tubes and put it carefully back together.

I put some gas in, not exactly real fresh, and gave it a test run. When I started it, it ran about 1,400 RPM, down about 400. As I drove it, I stopped and started several times. It gradually came down to about a thousand RPM idling and did not die when I came to a stop. It was doing much better and I decided to drive it to work tomorrow (twenty miles one way), put fresh high octane gas in, and just take it for a good extended drive to work the bugs out from sitting for so long.

I'll post the results of that test drive in the next day or two. Thanks to you and all the others on this thread that helped with this situation. jim

In reply to # 3683383 by Colonel musturd 79 The need for positive crankcase ventilation is to relieve crank case pressure caused by engine blow by which will cause gasket failures and oil leaks. The system that is used by some to some success, is where the valve cover is vented to the base of the air cleaner. This is not satisfactory for all situations. Then some owners have designed their own system. They drilled and taped the intake manifold, and installed a hose to the valve cover with a fixed orifice to meter vacuum and remove the crank case pressure.

Colonel musturd 79 Avatar
Colonel musturd 79 Michael McKinney
Winchester, VA, USA   USA
1978 MG Midget 1500 "Colonel Mustard"
1987 Pontiac Fiero "SILVER BULLET"
Good luck on your first drive, these cars are an adventure so have fun! Glad I could help.



Amore della Strada
For the love of the road


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