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Timing light won't go out with static timing? TIME URGENT

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chris Avatar
chris Platinum Member Chris Roop
Pendleton, OR, USA   USA
Pop the dist cap off and turn on the ignition. Now with a small screwdriver or something and with the points closed, use the screwdriver to lift the points open. Do you have a spark? If not, you need to get that fixed first. It was mentioned above how easy it is to get the points installed incorrectly.


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ozieagle Avatar
ozieagle Gold Member Herb Adler
Geelong Victoria, Australia   AUS
1958 Wolseley 1500 "Wooly"
1966 MG MGB "Bl**dy B"
Also the flexible wire, in the brown spagetti may be broken.

I would start from scratch. Make sure that cylinder #1 is on its compression stroke and set the timing for 10 deg, or what ever. The way I check that #1 is at its TDC is to remove thevalve cover and check that the rockers on one are loose.

Herb



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benhutcherson Avatar
benhutcherson Gold Member Ben Hutcherson
Louisville/Frankfort, KY, USA   USA
1970 MG MGB
Another thought since the car won't run-

Are you sure the points are actually opening? Check the point gap and make sure they are and THEN proceed to static timing.

course2kid Jeffrey Johnson
Fountain Valley, CA, USA   USA
1979 MG MGB "Lucy (Lucifer)"
I am still unclear how you are attaching leads. It would help if you draw a simple block diagram, take a picture of it and post the picture.

One quick question - how far are you twisting the body of the dustributor? If you are testing the John Twist video way, the test light should go on and off every 90 degrees, even if the points are adjusted way off angle (or the distributor drive gear is in 180 degrees off), unless, as noted below, the distributor points are stuck open, stuck closed, or the condensor is shorted.

Here is a quick video that shows how the distributor functions. In the video, the orange wire is equivalent to the white/black wire of your distributor. With your test lamp connected between a 12 VDC source and the white/black wire, whenever the points close (see video), the test light gets connected to ground through the points and the test light comes on. When the points open, there is no path for the electrical current and the test light goes off. In the video, also notice that there is a condensor tied between the orange wire (your white/black wire) and ground. If the condensor is shorted out, current will flow through it to ground and your test light will never turn off. Also, if the points never open, the light will stay on continuously.

If you have an ohmmeter, you can easily check to see if the condensor is shorted. Rotate the distributor body until you see the points open then connect your meter between the white/black wire of the distributor and the body of the distributor. Wait a couple seconds to give the condensor a chance to charge up from the meter's battery, and then check the reading. It should show as an open circuit, if it shows a low resistance, then the condensor is shorted.


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ohlord Avatar
ohlord Gold Member Rob C
North of Seattle, N.W., USA   USA
1957 Land Rover Series I "EYEYIYI"
1971 MG MGB
1971 MG MGB "Bedouin 2"
You dont need to static time to return the distributor to its near proprr spot and easily tune it from there.
You're making problems where none exist.

In reply to # 3717242 by James.Spencer Because I removed the distributor (without noting its position foolishly) and now can't get it to run.



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benhutcherson Avatar
benhutcherson Gold Member Ben Hutcherson
Louisville/Frankfort, KY, USA   USA
1970 MG MGB
In reply to # 3717637 by ohlord You dont need to static time to return the distributor to its near proprr spot and easily tune it from there.

In reply to # 3717242 by James.Spencer Because I removed the distributor (without noting its position foolishly) and now can't get it to run.

I'd have to agree with that.

Unless someone has messed with the distributor drive gear, the car should run with the nipple on the vacuum can pointed straight up or cocked just a bit clockwise from there. That's probably not optimum, but it's close enough that you can at least use a timing light and get it to where it needs to be.

My car has had the gear removed and reinserted a few teeth off so the "correct" position is rotated a bit clockwise further still from there. Still, my car will run with the nipple straight up. It won't run well enough to drive, but it will run well enough to get a light working. For a lot of the other MGs I've gotten my hands dirty on, the nipple upright position is pretty darn close to perfect.

barry s Avatar
barry s Silver Member Barry Stoll
Alexandria, VA, USA   USA
1972 MG MGB GT
1974 MG MGB
1976 Triumph TR6
1980 MG MGB
This assumes that the ignition wires are correctly inserted into the distributor cap.

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