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1800 Engine Block Identification

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mgbhivejon Jonathan Day
Meriden, CT, USA   USA
1969 MG MGB "Blackie"
1974 MG MGB GT "Demon Bee"
1974 MG MGB GT "Demi"
1974 MG MGB GT    & more
I acquired an 1800 short block appears to have been rebuilt as it has a new ID Plate stamped 18V883AEL26147 date clock D 3 8. It's 10 over with high compression forged pistons but no piston identification #'s or manufacturer. Non of my manuals have an 883 series. Any ideas????

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ohlord Avatar
ohlord Gold Member Rob C
North of Seattle, N.W., USA   USA
1957 Land Rover Series I "EYEYIYI"
1971 MG MGB
1971 MG MGB "Bedouin 2"
883
1979/1980
Standard late 18v
Watch core shift
Why forged pistons?



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mgbhivejon Jonathan Day
Meriden, CT, USA   USA
1969 MG MGB "Blackie"
1974 MG MGB GT "Demon Bee"
1974 MG MGB GT "Demi"
1974 MG MGB GT    & more
Thanks for the reply. No Idea as to why forged pistons came that way. Short block was free. Only block ,crank, pistons and rods. What do you mean watch core shift?

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Bernd Kamenicky Avatar
Bernd Kamenicky Bernard Kamenicky
Altlengbach, Lower Austria, Austria   AUT
1966 MG MGB GT "The Red One"
1971 MG MGB MkII "The Blue One"
Sand cores used for the cast of block "internals" can have movedduring casting, so a water way might lurk unusually tight near to bores. Particularly interesting at overbores.
But IMHO early blocks (18G to GD) were more prone to core shift than the 18V ones
Cheers

lgorg Avatar
lgorg Larry Gorg
Renton, WA, USA   USA
1966 MG MGB "Robbie"
I agree with Rob, its a late 18V engine block. Here is what one of the forum's posters has to say about engine blocks in general, but pertains to racing engines: B series engine blocks.

Speedracer Avatar
Speedracer Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Hap Waldrop
Greenville, SC, USA   USA
1967 MG MGB Racecar "The Biscuit"
You can probably tell who made the pistons from the undersized of the piston, custom forged pistons should not have any ID marks on top of them, are they dish or flat tops? They were, and still are some squeeze cast flat top piston out there for the MGB, BPNW used to offer them, but no longer do, and I am sure this is because 18V owners got in trouble with them, flat tops are too hot of a CR for a 18V for pump gas, if you do the math, .040 bore, stock head and block decks, and you end up about 10.7 to 1, too hot for premium pump gas. At the end of the day the price of these pistons we almost as much as a custom forged piston, which is nuts crazy and they have 3 thick ass compression rings, the engineer who designed these must have been on crack. Bottom line you don't need flat tops to get to 10.0 to 1 on a any MGB and you can get there with a good streetable piston sets which all use for rebuilding which are well under $200 a set. The only street application that justifies a custom forged pistons is a high boost forced induction engine



Hap Waldrop
Acme Speed Shop
864-370-3000
Website: www.acmespeedshop.com
hapwaldrop@acmespeedshop.com


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