MGExp

MGB & GT Forum

Scarebird Rear Discs update. They squeal! *UPDATE*! Not any more!

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

sweep Avatar
sweep Gold Member Chris W
Gosford, NSW, Australia   AUS
1966 MG MGB "Basil"
2013 Volkswagen Tiguan
2015 Audi A3
Took the MGB into my local inspection guy this morning and he didn't even blink about the rear discs. Had a bit of a look and filled out the pink slip. Drove straight there and straight home. By the time I was home the Pink slip had been lodged with the RMS so I paid the fee and it's all good.

One issue that I need to address is the brake squeal, more groan. When I lightly brake they squeal. Pressing more firmly and the squeal goes away.

Clearly coming from the back. When I disassembled the Festiva calipers the pads had some red coloured, rubbery stuff sticking the pads to the caliper.

I cleaned all this off and didn't re-apply anything else. (I'm actually still running the old pads as they had lots of meat left, I just cleaned the face on the linisher before putting them back in. I've got new ones but didn't see the need to use them - yet.)

Do you guys think this red stuff is some sort of anti-squeal magic and do you think I should replace it or wait to see how the pads go over the next few weeks?



The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.

To the intelligent person, life appears infinitely mysterious, but the stupid have an answer for everything.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-01-15 09:47 PM by sweep.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
lewisrn Avatar
lewisrn Gold Member Bob L
Danville, IN, USA   USA
1980 MG MGB "The "B"
Sounds like you removed the anti-squeal material. You can try parts store anti-squeal remedies.



In any debate, the side which strays from civil discussion is usually the side that lacks confidence in its debate position or in its ability to win the debate on the merit of their arguments. Making personal attacks on the opponents instead of staying on the subject is also a sign of weakness.

Anyone who always feels compelled to respond in kind to any perceived slight is often suffering from narcissism.

Denis Avatar
Denis Denis Hill
Bearii, Nth Victoria, Australia   AUS
Yes Chris that's the anti squeal adhesive. Let the pads bed in a bit for a while, you may not need it. We only use it if necessary. Denis



68 B roadster, Daffodil yellow, supercharger, Burgess SC head, SC cam, Mikuni HSR 48 carburetor and engine built for supercharging.

73 BGT V8 conversion starting with a bare shell. Built the engine early in 2016 with high comp pistons and a few other nice bits. Started on the body late 2016 and found Its a lot of work and expense starting from scratch. Did the work myself, mechanical, body. paint etc all except the interior trim.
Finished and going well, great to drive and quick. Now has a nice 3.07 LSD.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
rdgreen Avatar
rdgreen Gold Member Robert Green
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia   AUS
Filing/grinding a bevel on the leading edge of the shoes might help if the problem doesn't go away. Wear a face mask.
And, yes the rubbery stuff is anti squeal...obviously not effective in your case.

ohlord Avatar
ohlord Gold Member Rob C
North of Seattle, N.W., USA   USA
1957 Land Rover Series I "EYEYIYI"
1971 MG MGB
1971 MG MGB "Bedouin 2"
Old pads on new discs?
Pads need to be properly bedded in.
Anti squeal paste is SOP



"I'm a long way gone down this wild road I'm on
It's gonna take me where I'm bound
It's a long way around"



"These are the days that must happen to you"

RD2 Radar/ Electronic Warfare Technician
Vietnam 1969-1972

sweep Avatar
sweep Gold Member Chris W
Gosford, NSW, Australia   AUS
1966 MG MGB "Basil"
2013 Volkswagen Tiguan
2015 Audi A3
Yes, even though I refaced them, I thinking this was not a good idea. I only reused the pads because the new pads I'd ordered took forever to get to me. I needed to put something in there so I could move on. I intended to replace them when I got the new ones but didn't.
I think I'd best do that before I get too involved with other solutions.

In reply to # 3660763 by ohlord Old pads on new discs?
Pads need to be properly bedded in.
Anti squeal paste is SOP



The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.

To the intelligent person, life appears infinitely mysterious, but the stupid have an answer for everything.

sandglowB Avatar
sandglowB Silver Member Al Blosser
Uniontown, OH, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB
Do you notice any difference in the braking with the rear discs? Did you need a proportioning valve?



member - Emerald Necklace MG Register,
NAMGBR since 1991
infantry RVN 1969

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
sweep Avatar
sweep Gold Member Chris W
Gosford, NSW, Australia   AUS
1966 MG MGB "Basil"
2013 Volkswagen Tiguan
2015 Audi A3
No. Apart from noise, they work fine. No suggestion of brake lockup under heavy braking. Yet to have a 'panic' stop.

In reply to # 3660883 by sandglowB Do you notice any difference in the braking with the rear discs? Did you need a proportioning valve?

The hand brake requires a lot of effort on the lever to hold on a steep incline. The grip on the disc from the lever is not enough. Needs a longer lever at the brake or the handle.



The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.

To the intelligent person, life appears infinitely mysterious, but the stupid have an answer for everything.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-01-13 12:12 AM by sweep.

little G Avatar
little G Charlie T
queensland, QLD, Australia   AUS
1964 MG MGB "Little G"
so with all the changing effort and time , and the cost ....no noticable difference in braking ??....hmmmmmmm

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
sweep Avatar
sweep Gold Member Chris W
Gosford, NSW, Australia   AUS
1966 MG MGB "Basil"
2013 Volkswagen Tiguan
2015 Audi A3
I believe I established right from the start improvement of braking was not my primary goal. I was disappointed with the deterioration of the drum brake componentary. I was after something that was simpler. I believe I've achieved that and given others much more information if they feel inclined to go down that path themselves for whatever reason/s they have.
The question related to several other questions and suggestions that the rear discs would be detrimental to the front/rear braking balance. Hence the mention of a proportioning valve. My answer was no, there is no suggestion that the front/rear balance is compromised. I did not comment on any noticeable difference in braking.
Without comparative testing I can't comment definitively on any improvement. The only thing I'm prepared to say is that the braking is as good as I would expect a well maintained braking system would be.
However, I am prepared to say this. Previously it was fairly easy to lock one or both rear wheels when braking heavily, that has not been my experience so far. But, as previously stated, I've yet to have a real panic stop and at this early stage in the breaking in procedure I'm not prepared to simulate that just yet.
As far as cost, time and effort. That's for me to judge as it's MY cost, time and effort. Others can make their own judgement as to whether they want to follow based on my experience.
Your comment does not reflect what I have actually said.

In reply to # 3660892 by little G so with all the changing effort and time , and the cost ....no noticable difference in braking ??....hmmmmmmm



The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.

To the intelligent person, life appears infinitely mysterious, but the stupid have an answer for everything.

little G Avatar
little G Charlie T
queensland, QLD, Australia   AUS
1964 MG MGB "Little G"
don't get your knickers in a knot old mate ..testy f*%cker aren't ya ...I remember the same old approach on a 4x4 forum from you , ..history old mate , history

You just said "No "...so it begged a question from either end ...yeh ?

And I couldn't give a rats arse what you spend your dollar or time on sweep ...it was an observation by me as to whether "I " consider it worth it ...

Stay away from me mate if you are going to continue this approach to me ...I don't have the tolerance like on Patrol.com

Keep on braking

sweep Avatar
sweep Gold Member Chris W
Gosford, NSW, Australia   AUS
1966 MG MGB "Basil"
2013 Volkswagen Tiguan
2015 Audi A3
I've just had a closer look at the new pads. They have come with a sachet of 'CERA TEC™ Metal-free permanent lubricant'.
The instructions on the back say:
Quote: "Clean caliper and coat inside with CERA TEC™, also piston heads and pad backing plates. Never coat friction material or disc! Stops and prevents brake squeals."
I've attached a pic of the sachet.
Anyone had experience with this?
Doesn't feel or sound like what I scraped off the old pads.



The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.

To the intelligent person, life appears infinitely mysterious, but the stupid have an answer for everything.


Attachments:
IMG_7048.JPG    56.2 KB
IMG_7048.JPG

tvrgeek Avatar
tvrgeek Silver Member Scott S
Hillsborough, North Carolinia, USA   USA
1965 MG MGB
I notice a comment on a proportioning valve. I offer that it is incorrectly named. It does not adjust bias, but delay. In racing conditions, where you are hitting hard and fast, this does have the effect of not locking up because you are off before the delay is over. An adjustable valve is really handy if allowed. They are normally used in a disk/drum combination. Bias is properly adjusted with cylinder diameters or a balance bar. Some tuning can be done by pad selection. Of course, perfect balance is only available under one condition, so without a computer, our braking is a compromise.

A study by Saab back in the 60's suggested the cost of rear disks was worth it for bad weather. You got slightly better petal control in rain and snow. For dry pavement, not any performance advantage. With the weight of our axle, probably not much advantage there either. Maybe a tiny inertia advantage.



Cogito ergo sum periculoso

ohlord Avatar
ohlord Gold Member Rob C
North of Seattle, N.W., USA   USA
1957 Land Rover Series I "EYEYIYI"
1971 MG MGB
1971 MG MGB "Bedouin 2"
Huh?
It adjusts brake pressure psi
Not delay

Lighter, less prone to fade
Properly adjusted faster, shorter stopping distances when used witn better wider tires.



"I'm a long way gone down this wild road I'm on
It's gonna take me where I'm bound
It's a long way around"



"These are the days that must happen to you"

RD2 Radar/ Electronic Warfare Technician
Vietnam 1969-1972

Speedracer Avatar
Speedracer Platinum Member Hap Waldrop
Greenville, SC, USA   USA
1967 MG MGB Racecar "The Biscuit"
In reply to # 3660883 by sandglowB Do you notice any difference in the braking with the rear discs? Did you need a proportioning valve?

Why would he, they only do 20% or less of the braking, I tell folks we have rear brakes for one reason to keep the ass end from passing the front end under heavy braking, that's it. I have put rear disc brakes set ups on a couple of LBC race cars, I did it for the most part because it was a easier system to maintain. Both systems were on racing Spridgets and they are royal PITA to deal when you add double bearing hubs, and drum brakes, so rear disc was easier to deal with. on the MGB race car, the rear drum set up is easy enough to deal with and my brakes, which are stock all the way around, other the front pads and ducting, as the rules require, are actually an advantage for me over other cars I race with. They last forever, I just redid the rear brakes after 8 years of racing. I am not trying to give anyone any grief over putting rear disc brakes on their MGB, do what you want, but you need to be honest with yourself, because when compared to properly working rear drum set up, rear disc will offer no advantage, other than a little easier to maintain, and maintenance on rear brakes is very minimal to begin with. At the end of the day you could pick many other things for your car, that would give you more back.



Hap Waldrop
Acme Speed Shop
864-370-3000
Website: www.acmespeedshop.com
hapwaldrop@acmespeedshop.com


Member Services:
MG/ Triumph Performance Street/Race Engines - Cylinder Head Porting - Modified SU HS Carbs - DIY Engine Rebuild Kits With Free Tech Advice - VTO alloy wheels for British Sport Cars, and others
. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions




Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster