Visit our Twitter feed for more great content
MGExp

T-Series & Prewar Forum

wilwood disc brakes on a mg tf 1500

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

michaelo Silver Member Michael Ohalloran
Dayton, md., USA   USA
Has anyone installed wilwood front disc brakes on their tf 1500? If you have how would you rate them?Secondly what would be a ball park labor rate for installation. thanks Michael

. Hide this ad & support a small business by becoming a Gold Supporting Member
Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
bweldon Bill Weldon
Fredericksburg, TX, USA   USA
I have recently installed Wilwood front disc brakes on my 1953 MG TD. They are certainly an improvement over the original bakes. I also installed wire wheels (from Moss) at the same time. The TD disc wheels have a 5 lug bolt pattern while the TF wire wheel hubs use a 6 bolt pattern to attach the brake drums. The Wilwood kit comes with 5 bolt adapter plates that will not work on the wire wheel hubs. I made new adapter plates and can supply a drawing if you need it.
Other than making the adapter plates, the installation was straight forward. I did the installation myself, so can not give you a labor cost. It took me less than a day while recovering from back surgery.

Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
dltpilot Avatar
dltpilot Dennis Taylor
Holly Springs, NC, USA   USA
1955 MG TF 1500 "SAR (Some Assembly Required)"
1974 MG MGB GT
I recently installed disc brakes on my TF 1500 but I saved a bunch on money by using MGA/MGB components as detailed in this video by LaVerne Downey here in the MGExperience.

https://www.mgexp.com/phorum/read.php?46,3684713,3684713#msg-3684713

. Hide this ad & support a small business by becoming a Gold Supporting Member
Was this post helpful or interesting?
+1 Yes No Thank
Tim66 Avatar
Tim66 Silver Member Tim Burchfield
Toledo, OH, USA   USA
1951 MG TD
1953 MG TD
Michael, you will probably find this thread helpful.

https://mg-cars.org.uk/cgi-bin/or17?runprog=mgbbs&access=11130842202073&mode=archiveth&subject=8&subjectar=8&thread=2018100101082210789 Paste this link into your browser. You may have to sign up if you aren't a member but it is an excellent site. Let me know if it doesn't work.

Tim



1951 MG TD TD26711
1953 MG TD TD12524
1980 Corvette



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-08 10:09 AM by Tim66.

Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
WHT Avatar
WHT william luddite
Brakenville, USA, USA   USA
Hi Michael.

The Wilwood parts are very nicely machined and the hubs are already setup for tapered bearings. I ordered a set of MG factory wheel/bearing spacers and shims so they can be installed correctly. I wouldn't install it without the spacers (Moss 264-090 I think).

Some complain about its cost. However, the street price with un-drilled rotors is about $1200 with free shipping. The cost difference is actually only about $300 and it comes with detailed instructions unlike other options.

Regards, Bill

First picture shows a hub. Second shows wheel spacers (comes with wheel spacers) and the wheel bearing spacers (which you should order).


Attachments:
Wilwood Hub.JPG    35.7 KB
Wilwood Hub.JPG

Wheel and Bearing Spacers.JPG    64.7 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
Was this post helpful or interesting?
+1 Yes No Thank
Fsisson Avatar
Fsisson fred sisson
nashville, IN, USA   USA
1938 Morgan 3 Wheeler
1950 MG TD "007"
What did you do about master cylinder residual pressure valve?

Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
Fsisson Avatar
Fsisson fred sisson
nashville, IN, USA   USA
1938 Morgan 3 Wheeler
1950 MG TD "007"
Wilwood instalation is very simple... great instructions and excellent quality... so instalation cost should be reasonable. Can't imagine it taking more than four hours...

But... to do any disk/drum conversion properly (all, not just Wilwood...) you need to remove the RPV valve (Residual Pressure Valve) from the stock master cylinder and then install a 2lb RPV in the front line and a 10lb RPV in the rear line. I believe the RPV inside of the stock MG master cylinder is 8lbs.. which is going to mean a lot of drag for the disk brakes. They only need a small amount of residual pressure to keep them in light contact with the disk.

Now messing with TD master cylinder is a bear of a job and probably costly to have done.

Installing the brakes was a breeze but to do it right you need to address the different residual pressure requirements of disk and drum brake units.

I'm facing that at the moment... and as long as I'm going to have to tackle it,
I plan to go to a dual cylinder for safety... and a remote resivour on the firewall for convience.

Was this post helpful or interesting?
+1 Yes No Thank
Fsisson Avatar
Fsisson fred sisson
nashville, IN, USA   USA
1938 Morgan 3 Wheeler
1950 MG TD "007"
Well as Wilwood stated in their instructions the residual pressure valve in in the TD (at least mine) holds too much pressure to fully release the disk brakes. I can turn the wheel with my hands, but they are definitely dragging.

More reading and studying followed.
From 'The Brake Handbook' "RVP valves are not used with disk brakes as the pistons are not retracted with springs"
From TD workshop manual.... The master cylinder RPV valve maintains "approximately" 8lbs pressure to keep the seals expanded upon retraction.
From Wilwood "for car with the master cylinder lower than the caliper a 2lb RPV will prevent the possibility of the brake fluid draining back into the master cylinder over a period of time"

Soooo. The workshop wording "approximentaly" 8lbs probably explains why some (many) have stated that their disk conversions work fine with no modifications to their master cylinder. The RVP inside of their master cylinder may be on the low side of ""approximentaly " 8lbs. Mine may be on the high side.

MY concluison... I need to remove the RPV valve from the TD master cylinder... the Wilwood instructions show how...
I will install a 2lb RPV in the front brake line. The TD master is lower than the calapers. Easy to do and peace of mind about flooding the master cylinder.
I will install 10 lb RPV in the brake line to the rear.


I'm not sure, but at first glance it looks like I might be able to remove the RPV from the master cylinder without removing the master from the car. Stay tuned...

Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
Buckdendave David Hill
St Neots, Cambridgeshire, UK   GBR
1954 MG TF
Its much easier to remove the master cylinder than you seem to think. Just disconnect the brake line and push to one side, then remove the two large bolts holding the master cylinder to the chassis, then slide it backwards from the rubber boot and out.
Dave H

Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
Fsisson Avatar
Fsisson fred sisson
nashville, IN, USA   USA
1938 Morgan 3 Wheeler
1950 MG TD "007"
Dave thank you!

I just glanced under the car last night and you're right... it didn't look that hard. What am I thinking of? Maybe the pedal return spring when I re-bushed the pedals? It's been a few years but I remember spending an extremely frustrating hour or so with my head bouncing between the chassis and tranny trying to hook a spring... using screwdrivers, ViceGrips and a plethora of other tools... horrible one time job for me, car on 3ft jackstands, siting on the concrete floor, car at just the right height that I couldn't do it laying down and couldn't sit up.
To be honest... I am a lazy mechanic... I'll spend an hour making a tool for a spefic job rather than spend 30 frustrating minutes doing it without the tool. I have a drawer full of 'special tool's I've made. I swore that I'd re-engineer that dam_ spring or figure out a tool to make it easy next time.
One reason I love my old TD is that that I can identify with the original owner. It came with several bent/modified wrenches.. along with two pickup loads of used spares. There is one bent wrench I haven't figured out yet but one day... one day I'm sure I'll be doing some frustrating job on the car an have an 'ah-ha' moment and that wrench will be the perfect tool to make the job easier.

Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
TD4834 Avatar
TD4834 Bill Chasser
Sacramento, CA, USA   USA
1950 MG TD
1951 MG TD MkII
Re return spring: the easiest way to tackle the return spring install is to remove the MC. Hook the spring to the tab in the front of the peddle box. With a looped wire around the rear spring hook and through the rear MC hole in the peddle box, the spring can easily be pulled back into position.



Bill Chasser
TD-4834
TD/c-8151
TD/c-16920
TD-19408
TD-24060

Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
Fsisson Avatar
Fsisson fred sisson
nashville, IN, USA   USA
1938 Morgan 3 Wheeler
1950 MG TD "007"
Bill... if that works... you're my hero! Thanks!

Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
LaVerne Avatar
LaVerne LaVerne Downey
Fruita, CO, USA   USA
1954 MG TF "Green Hornet"
1969 MG MGB
1979 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
I sent you a PM in case you did not see it Fred.

Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
Declan Burns Avatar
Duesseldorf, NRW, Germany   DEU
Exactly-no need to touch the return spring.
Regards
Declan

In reply to # 3890757 by Buckdendave Its much easier to remove the master cylinder than you seem to think. Just disconnect the brake line and push to one side, then remove the two large bolts holding the master cylinder to the chassis, then slide it backwards from the rubber boot and out.
Dave H

Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
Fsisson Avatar
Fsisson fred sisson
nashville, IN, USA   USA
1938 Morgan 3 Wheeler
1950 MG TD "007"
THANK YOU GENTLEMEN! You are so right. It's been 7 years since I replaced the whole brake system. Got it out in 15 minutes, apart and RPV removed in another 15. Now to get a rebuild kit & make up a few lines to make a neat installation of the two external RPV valves and I'm back on the road.

In the 20's here & would have waited for slightly warmer weather without your input.

On the future menu
Diafram clutch cover
Complete rewire.
Maybe a can or two more cans of clear spray to seal the bare metal where more metal flake paint has flaked off.
Water injection.

Was this post helpful or interesting?
Yes No Thank
. Hide this ad & support a small business by becoming a Gold Supporting Member

To add your reply, or post your own questions




Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster