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T-Series Tips, Tricks, Short-cuts & Cheats

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Tim66 Avatar
Tim66 Silver Member Tim Burchfield
Toledo, OH, USA   USA
1951 MG TD
1953 MG TD
Or this.

Tim



1951 MG TD TD26711
1953 MG TD TD12524
1980 Corvette

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Tim66 Avatar
Tim66 Silver Member Tim Burchfield
Toledo, OH, USA   USA
1951 MG TD
1953 MG TD
Or this. From the Frame Up has them.

Tim



1951 MG TD TD26711
1953 MG TD TD12524
1980 Corvette


Attachments:
bonnet-supports-mg-ta-tb-tc-td-mgta-mgtb-mgtc-mgtd-800x600.jpeg    34.9 KB
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ML320X5 Avatar
ML320X5 Stan Y
Tulsa, OK, USA   USA
1952 MG TD
1973 MG MGB
2002 BMW X5
My thought was trying to be totally reversible. No drilling, minimize impact to the integrity. Not saying mind is any better or worst but mine is almost cost nothing, no machining, wrenching involved. No permanent tie down. Remove in sec. Stow behind seats floor.

My concern on your 1st pic is the corner digged into the u-channel. With a single attachment, it will swivel. I sure don't quite like metal to metal contact causing wear and tear.

Don't know much about Frameup parts but looking at the geometry, it's at an angle (Mine is almost 90 Deg to support the panel which is the best for load path). I would guess there is a bracketry involved.

Also don't forget there is wind gust conditions if park outdoor. Just want to share my .02



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 2018-10-29 07:35 PM by ML320X5.

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Tim66 Avatar
Tim66 Silver Member Tim Burchfield
Toledo, OH, USA   USA
1951 MG TD
1953 MG TD
Stan, absolutely nothing wrong with your solutions. They are great ideas. I was just trying to present other ideas. The supports rods that are sold by From The Frame Up have a rubber ball on one end that goes in to the hood latch spring and a small metal bracket with a hole that mounts on a cowl bolt. They provide a tremendous amount of space for working on the engine and look cool at car shows. The bracket I made that fits on the radiator stay rod is just aluminum channel. The corner cushion on the bonnet prevents metal to meat contact. As I said, I wasn't presenting better ideas just different ideas.

Regards

Tim



1951 MG TD TD26711
1953 MG TD TD12524
1980 Corvette

AZTD Avatar
AZTD Silver Member Mike Grogan
Glendale, AZ, USA   USA
1953 MG TD
I use 6 rod tubes I had left over from some hanging lamps my wife had me put up in the kitchen area.
These tubes came with the lights but did not use all the rods. You can buy just the rods(tubes)from any big box store.
They screw into each other. I store them in a pouch that came with a jack handle from a modern car.
when screwed together, one end goes into the triangle area caused by a brace and body, resting on the frame.
The other end fits onto a bolt end next to the hood latch. I use 3 rods on each side. Pic only shows 3.
I then use a vice plyers and that pouch to clamp both hood halves together.
All stores in the pouch for storage. The painted ends are to quickly ID which end screws in which.
I will have to get a pic of it all in place.



1953 MG TD TD23816



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-10-29 07:49 AM by AZTD.


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jimmac48 Matthew M
Columbus, GA, USA   USA
1950 MG TD
I use a piece of scrap oak wood about 1/2 thick. It is notched to fit over the hinges on the tool box and notched on the ends to accept the bonnet. Stores easily behind the tool box with the fuel stick when not in use.


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Kaklemmer Avatar
Kaklemmer Kenneth Klemmer
Farmington Hills, MI, USA   USA
1948 MG TC "Gigi"
1957 MG MGA 1500 Coupe "Ginger"
2005 Lotus Elise "Stirling"
2012 Mazda MX-5 NC "Joanie"    & more
Here's an easy $2 solution. Go to the shoe store and buy a couple leather shoelaces. Get the really heavy duty kind (as you can see i used a cheap one and it broke!) Self storing and won't fall in the wind.
Ken


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Declan Burns Avatar
Duesseldorf, NRW, Germany   DEU
I use something similar. (older photo)
Regards
Declan


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Ctwidle Chris Twidle
Reesville, Queensland, Australia   AUS
1954 MG TF
Would these ‘composite’ floorboard washers get past the scrutineers? $7.51 for 20.
Chris


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Mikelead Mike Leadbeater
York, Yorks, UK   GBR
1953 MG TD
Gear Lever Removal.

Removing the gear lever, or stick shifter as you guys in the 'states say, on the TD is a problem, as the two pins in either side of the lever ball cannot be easily removed, being pressed-in.
After trying and failing to lever one out with a small screwdriver, I decided to purchase a cobalt stub drill and attempt to drill one pin out.
I bought a 5 mm cobolt stub drill on our favourite auction site, not cheap at nearly 8 quid, but needed to be done.

The gearbox extension flange was fixed to an angle plate so that the pin to be drilled was uppermost and square to the drill table.
With carefull trial and error centering, I was able to drill the pin until it was loosened , then prise out the remainder with a scribe.
N.b. The reason to use a stub drill is that it will self-centre, and obviously cobolt to drill the hardened pin.

The lever could then be removed without needing to drill the other pin, this could be left alone.

As 5mm is the correct tapping drill for an m6 thread, the drilled hole was tapped this size.

A cap head 6 mm screw was shortened and turned at the end to 5 mm diameter to engage in the lever ball slot, so that when fully tightened it engaged the correct amount with the ball slot.

I hardened the machined end of the screw by heating to carrot-red and quenching in water, then tempering to a straw colour.
Now I can remove the lever easily by just loosening the cap head screw, job done.

Hope this works for you.

Mike.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-11-09 07:06 AM by Mikelead.

Tim66 Avatar
Tim66 Silver Member Tim Burchfield
Toledo, OH, USA   USA
1951 MG TD
1953 MG TD
Mike, excellent. Thanks.

Tim



1951 MG TD TD26711
1953 MG TD TD12524
1980 Corvette

Declan Burns Avatar
Duesseldorf, NRW, Germany   DEU
I did something similar but tapped it M8.
Regards

Declan


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Tim66 Avatar
Tim66 Silver Member Tim Burchfield
Toledo, OH, USA   USA
1951 MG TD
1953 MG TD
Declan, did you really mean M8? That seem very large to me. Nice job though regardless of the size.

Tim



1951 MG TD TD26711
1953 MG TD TD12524
1980 Corvette

Declan Burns Avatar
Duesseldorf, NRW, Germany   DEU
Yes M8 and then turned the grub screw to 5.6mm to fit the slot in the gear stick as on the drawing.
I also re-bushed the remote using a DIY bracket and a brass cable gland as a bearing.
Regards
Declan


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MGTF1500 Ardeche France Avatar
MGTF1500 Ardeche France Thierry SUCHIER
TOURNON SUR RHONE, Rhône-Alpes Auvergne, France   FRA
Declan, you made these different cages and stops to adjust the movement of the gear lever?
Sincerely, Thierry de l'Ardèche

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