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Exquisite "TF" Debut

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ping45 Silver Member Rich G
Highland, CA, USA   USA
Personally, I think this actually represents exactly what one could visualize ending up with if (1), you are not a "purist", and (2), you have an unlimited supply of $$$ and still loved the "old MG" and wanted to bring her up to date with the most "modern", current equipment possible. Although many of us would not have a desire to go this far, it seems to pretty well represent just what you could do if you were in a financial position to do so. I for one, am glad to see this car as it shows what could be done! Beautiful piece of work, not exactly my thing, but hey, job well done!

Rich7771

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Gregory7500 Gregory Serduke
LaGrange, IL, USA   USA
Gentlemen,

I am sorry for the delay in response to some of your questions. My beloved brother-in-law unexpectedly passed away the day of my post.

The owner of this car is well into his 80's. This car is the culmination of the trials and tribulations of 60 years of MG ownership. He wanted this car to be faster, more reliable and comfortable. Is that not what a sports car is? To say this car is not an MG anymore is ridiculous. I rebuilt 2 engines for this gentlemen, both configured similarly (high-performance) one for a TF that he drives regularly and the other for this car. He has a sharp mind, but the body is no longer willing, and asked me, after seeing samples of my work if I would consider putting this car together. He has been acquiring parts for over 30 years, many of them new old stock, the quality of which is no longer available. All the parts have been power coated, re chromed, etc., etc., meticulously wrapped in paper dated from the late 1980's. I am 67 years old. I was nursing on my mother's tit when this man was an officer in charge of a gunnery battery on the 38th parallel. I figured he is owed something. As I stated before, the fit and finish of this car is spectacular. It was not without its trials and tribulations, as all of the parts were delivered to me painted, never before having been assembled (always a big mistake). It was asked about the modifications to the electrical system by Ron. A bus bar makes more sense than a multi-pin connector because of its ease to troubleshoot. You have a break point between the wiring harness and the dash panel that is easily accessible to a simple electrical tester ( believe it came from McMaster Caar). I am attaching photos that I have found during restoration pertaining to my modifications of the electrical system of this car. The additional fuse boxes on the right side of the car provide protection for the original wires that are not fused at all as well as the fuel pumps.
Laverne, the SCCA event is the perfect place to debut this car, as the SCCA was founded post world war II by MG owners. They were very desirous to have an example for display. Honestly, when you view this car, it is in no way apparent the many modifications/enhancements that have been incorporated to make this car faster, more reliable and more pleasurable to drive. As far as how much money he has in this car, I have no idea; however, as I stated, it was done over a long period of time which takes the sting out. Early with my journey with this car, I reached out to members of this forum with some particular questions (I have never touched a TF before), and they were kind enough to help me. All I am trying to do is give back. No Mr. Pyle, I am not looking for more work, I have more than I can handle now, as I have a 55 speedster (Porsche) coming. Frankly, I am surprised that nobody has asked more questions about the modifications, especially the unique way I support the bonnet. Any other questions, I will try to respond to.

Additional post to follow with more photos.

Gregory S.


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Gregory7500 Gregory Serduke
LaGrange, IL, USA   USA
Additional photos.


PS - It is cold as hell in Chicago! I need to get out of here.

Gregory S

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TX, USA   USA
1952 MG TD
1958 MG MGA 1500
Thanks. Now I realize this was a labor of love. We await news of the shake down cruise. I think we can all agree that it is still a MG. BTW 80 only seems old to those who are younger. I have a TD of which I am proud. I had a new one in 1952 (which gives you a clue).

ping45 Silver Member Rich G
Highland, CA, USA   USA
Gregory, did you receive my responding re: panels PM?

Rich7771

chunck01 Gold Member Chuck Branick
Prescott, AZ, USA   USA
1954 MG TF
Gregory,
You prompted about the bonnet support.... there have been many previous threads on this topic...and I have been looking for a solution for my TF.
This recent photo of your idea is really great!!!! first I have seen this approach... Question is what is the device?, where did you get it? How is it attached?
Any info would certainly be appreciated by those on the forum who are still pondering this matter..... THANKS.
Chuck B. Prescott, AZ.
P.S. I use to live in Schaumburg, IL. (sp).... so I can relate to your issues with the cold.... YIKES!!!!!!

LaVerne Avatar
LaVerne LaVerne Downey
Fruita, CO, USA   USA
1954 MG TF "Green Hornet"
1969 MG MGB
1979 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
You may have taken my comment the wrong way Gregory.... the car is beautiful....What I was getting at was that I would think a representitive of SCCA history would be a bare bones crappy factory paint and finish....of course with the period go fast goodies......The car is now far nicer than anyone running SCCA events could have ever envisioned....just my two pence.

Gregory7500 Gregory Serduke
LaGrange, IL, USA   USA
Chuck,

I will try to explain this unique improvement in supporting the bonnet. I have done this on 2 TF's. The silver car was the 1st. The battery needs to be moved forward 3/4 of an inch. Because of the owner's choice of an Optima battery and the mounting instructions stated by the manufacturer, I had to make a foot mount, which I did. The second TFI incorporated this bonnet support system too, used a regular battery, for which I made a 3/4 in plywood shim. See photo of pattern. The supports are available at any good hardware store or furniture hardware store - they are called lid supports. They are also utilized on folding legs of tables. The points of fixation are crucial. The silver car was 8 7/8 ths in center to center. The second car was 9 7/8 ths center to center. The supports for the second car were more robust. Actually, I took them from my Eastwood Sandblasting cabinet which the owner replaced from Eastwood. Most of the supports available are brass plated, it was hard to find zinc plated. The attachment to the bonnet was cut from a light duty aluminum angel, affixed to the bonnet support with mounting tape. I have not sufficiently road tested the silver car due to the weather, but the second car belongs to a participant on this forum named builder Bob. The mounting points on the bonnet itself let go due to engine heat. He found at McMaster Caar some heavy duty heat resistant mounting tape that has done the job. I feel this support system is far superior to anything else. it is strong, secure and always there. The pictures should be self-explanatory. Any questions, I will try to address.

Rich, from California, I will address removable side panels tomorrow. Somehow I had trouble responding to your PM.

Gregory S


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Gregory7500 Gregory Serduke
LaGrange, IL, USA   USA
Additional photos


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TX, USA   USA
1952 MG TD
1958 MG MGA 1500
I use a stick to hold up the bonnets.

Steve S Avatar
Abingdon West, Southern California, USA   USA
Edit: Oops, didn't see all your photos. Never mind, and enjoy this random photo of a Morris bonnet prop.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-30 12:12 PM by Steve S.


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MGTF1500 Ardeche France Avatar
MGTF1500 Ardeche France Thierry SUCHIER
TOURNON SUR RHONE, Rhône-Alpes Auvergne, France   FRA
Gregory,
I do not understand the photo 2715 with "SAVE"?
Sincerely, Thierry de l'Ardèche

Loyer Avatar
Loyer Dennis Loyer
Chatham, ON, Canada   CAN
Looks like the left over material after he has made his two flange brackets.

MGTF1500 Ardeche France Avatar
MGTF1500 Ardeche France Thierry SUCHIER
TOURNON SUR RHONE, Rhône-Alpes Auvergne, France   FRA
In reply to # 3883171 by Loyer Looks like the left over material after he has made his two flange brackets.

Oh?
I had the impression that the attachment on the hood was L shaped

Is it the one with an abutment or a groove?

Sincerely, Thierry de l'Ardèche



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-30 01:56 PM by MGTF1500 Ardeche France.


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Loyer Avatar
Loyer Dennis Loyer
Chatham, ON, Canada   CAN
I may be wrong (that happens a lot) but it looks like the flange bracket material in-the-flat ; after it is cut out, then it would be bent 90 deg .

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