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When does it become cost-prohibitive to do rust repair?

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Gerald O Avatar
Gerald O Gerald O'Docharty
Wake Forest, North Carolina, USA   USA
1978 MG MGB
In reply to # 3888602 by Gerry ...
BTW, my 78B had the crack of doom on both doors. The local body shops will not reskin the door. They want to use NEW door, only. I can live with the crack. I've never reskinned a door and I don't think I'd try to do it myself. Looks simple but it has to be done right to get the lines correct

Reskinning an MGB door is actually pretty easy. One of the easiest body panels to replace.

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oleanderjoe Avatar
oleanderjoe Gold Member Joseph Baba
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
Here is a GUIDE LINE
1. If you can see clean thru the car without opening the doors.
2. If the ground if visible where your feet would normally be.
3. If the engine and or gearbox are sitting on the GROUND, still inside the frame rails.
4. If the rear spring shackles are visible. INSIDE the boot.
5. If the front fenders are gently swaying in the breeze.
6. If it looks like a "Wooley Mammoth" has died INSIDE the car.
and if it looks like what used to be copper wiring is now a lovely shade of Green. RUN, RUN FOR YOUR LIFE. smileys with beer




In reply to # 3888590 by danthefitman When does it become cost-prohibitive to do rust repair or having to replace entire panels or, doors?

Probably better to find a car without much if any rust I take it. Yo.



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"BENJAMIN FRANKLIN" >>(Expanded) The bitterness of poor quality (or Crappy Workmenship) remains LONG AFTER the Sweet Taste of Low Price is forgotten.


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MG Logic Phil Pierce
Newtown, CT, USA   USA
Deleted double post



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-10 01:03 PM by MG Logic.

MG Logic Phil Pierce
Newtown, CT, USA   USA
Hard to give a definitive answer without seeing pictures. Big difference between a car with some rust in early stages that needs floors and inner rocker repairs versus a car which has extensive rust everywhere. In other words a "rust bucket".

The difference between the two is in the first case you can weld the repair panels to solid metal whereas with a rust bucket you can't. There is a big difference between the two. Cost wise even the " easy " job gets expensive quickly. You still have to factor in the cost of paint and painting labor on the repaired sections if not the entire car. Hypothetically let's say just in materials you need $2000 in repair panels plus $1000 in paint and supplies. You are already at $3000 just in materials. Realistically the only way to make this job work financially is if you can weld and paint IMO.

There is an upside in this type of project in that when you are done you will know for certain that you have a structurally solid car. And if the work is done properly you won't have to be concerned about it rusting for a long time if ever.

On the flip side you can buy a car that is supposedly "rust free" only to find out in a year or two that it needs rust repair. In some respects those are the worst cars to buy because after paying a premium for condition any further costs for welding and paint puts you way above market value.

The real deciding factor is really what type of person you are in terms of starting and actually being able to finish a project. The skills themselves are not terribly difficult to master. The real difficulty is being able to consistently allocate enough time on a regular basis to push the job to completion. Figure at least 3X more time and effort than you originally estimate.

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Triumphant66 Avatar
Triumphant66 Kent C
Richmond, VA, USA   USA
1956 Austin-Healey 100M "ParisieM"
1963 MG MGB
1964 MG MGB "Nanette"
1966 Austin-Healey 3000 BJ8    & more
How much return does one get from golf, if that's their hobby?

Almost no MGB is worth any rust repair if you're talking payback or ROI. Do it for fun.

K



My first LBC: 1969 MGB purchased in July 1977 in Richmond, VA somewhere in the Fan District. OO get in touch?.

Triumphant66 Avatar
Triumphant66 Kent C
Richmond, VA, USA   USA
1956 Austin-Healey 100M "ParisieM"
1963 MG MGB
1964 MG MGB "Nanette"
1966 Austin-Healey 3000 BJ8    & more
Dan there are more decent used MGBs for sale than there are ignorant sellers - like you have there. Move on. Car is worth about $400.

K



My first LBC: 1969 MGB purchased in July 1977 in Richmond, VA somewhere in the Fan District. OO get in touch?.

underwaterdrug Avatar
underwaterdrug Bradley Atherton
Muskogee, OK, USA   USA
1972 MG MGB
1972 MG MGB
One year ago I decided that I would take my hobby to the next level, purchase a welder, a paint gun, and many other tools to do the body work on a slightly rusted :-) 72 mgb. I had a blast learning to weld and feel that it was not that difficult to learn. You Tube and forums are excellent. It probably took me much longer than someone skilled, but I enjoyed the process. The results have been excellent and many have complimented the results. I have $6000 in a what I would call a restored daily driver with tools and parts.
With all that said, I would advise going for it. You will enjoy the car even more knowing you completed the restoration.


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MG Logic Phil Pierce
Newtown, CT, USA   USA
If you are in it for $6000 including the car then you did extremely well!

Living in the Northeast I have found the best "restoration" tool is a trip south and a one-way u-haul truck and trailer rental back with a reasonably rust free project car in tow.

danthefitman Avatar
danthefitman Dan H
Portland, OR, USA   USA
1979 MG MGB MkIII "Simply, A Great B!"
Great looking B Bradley, well done. I'm sure you're correct. The same can be said for the mechanical side of things. I did it on that front with an Overdrive gearbox 9 years ago. Got a 77 B and used its OD for my car and a ton of might as wells whilst I was 'in there' -
saved myself a ton of money and learnt plenty. I did it right too.

With a 5 year old girl, building my newer business, a Wife in full time Nurse Practitioners school Masters program at OHSU, and Captaining our ship as Daddy & Husband, I don't see where I'd make time. Taking up and tooling up, for rust repair would use an abundant amount of time I don't have in this season. Getting a non-rusted to the bone car is going to be my route.

In reply to # 3889275 by underwaterdrug One year ago I decided that I would take my hobby to the next level, purchase a welder, a paint gun, and many other tools to do the body work on a slightly rusted :-) 72 mgb. I had a blast learning to weld and feel that it was not that difficult to learn. You Tube and forums are excellent. It probably took me much longer than someone skilled, but I enjoyed the process. The results have been excellent and many have complimented the results. I have $6000 in a what I would call a restored daily driver with tools and parts.
With all that said, I would advise going for it. You will enjoy the car even more knowing you completed the restoration.



1st Place Winner ABFM Portland Oregon 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 & 2016!
Email me for questions or needs, I'll respond promptly! dan@allpointsorganized.com
Life. Positively in order.

pdrsn Avatar
pdrsn Silver Member Eric Pedersen
Tualatin, OR, USA   USA
1974 MG MGB "Barnacle"
Dan,

I too am thinking of a new GT project and have been eyeing the same car on Portland Craigslist. After my experience restoring my current roadster that included plenty of rust repair, I would second most of the previous posts:

If you have more time than money AND want to learn new stuff, buy the rust bucket and a welder.

If you don't have the insane amount of time to invest that it requires, buy the cleaner car and enjoy driving it and tinkering with the little stuff.

The car you are talking about looks like several hundred hours to get on the road.

LENZ Avatar
LENZ Jim Barlow
Leominster, MA, USA   USA
1974 MG MGB GT "Murphy"
In reply to # 3888739 by Rick Fawthrop The East coast and UK guys don’t have a choice.
how true, salt truck just went buy 'pre-treating' the roads for snow tonight. cars driving thru salt..
i lose a month of driving until it is all washed off the roads in the spring.

Eteamjack Avatar
Eteamjack Silver Member Jack Barth
Placentia, calif, USA   USA
1974 MG MGB "Old Yeller 7D4MGB"
Never if your working on the right vehicle. My son in law recently sold two rusted Alfa Romeo hulks for $40k.

cschaefer Silver Member Chuck Schaefer
West Chicago, IL, USA   USA
I am just getting started on a GT rebuild. It has rust in the usual places; sills, doglegs wheel arches etc. And it is missing the chassis crossmember! No engine no trans. Somewhere along the line somebody did the floors (Very poorly) that will have to be redone to meet my goals. I am thinking I'll be close to $1,500 in replacement body steel alone. Hopefully I will find somebody's unused panels from a stalled resto to help lower that cost. I've got the MIG and TIG welders and a 2-3 yr plan. I figure I'm ahead once I'm done since I know it will have been gone thru completely.

If you are more of a "I want a car to drive" kind of person, wait for the right vehicle to come along. If you enjoy the journey as I do, then there is no "too much" IMO. You could be spending that dough down at the local tavern every week and have nothing to show for it in the end.

Donthuis Avatar
Donthuis Don van Riet
Rijswijk, ZH, Netherlands   NLD
I wonder when the real strength of the car body will go, such as when the front bulkhead, the two runners on which the engine rest and to which the crossmember attaches have lost their strength. The same is valid for the rear runners extending below the boot and when all leaf spring mounts and their fixings are detoriated. Sills and fenders, or just their bottoms and the doors are replaceable or restorable parts. This state of decay must be after a very long time in humid environments, because the car body of the B is made of 1mm thick steel. Cross members are even made of much thicker steel

For those of us skilled in shaping steel and welding the different parts together, there is no limit to what one can do at moderate cost, but having professionals do all those jobs would certainly prove to be no longer cost effective. In that case buying a Heritage shell and transferring all parts is the only way out.

Recognizing the overall number of 400+k MGB's produced , with 85% going to the States makes finding an alternative, restorable car over there much easier

PS Costs for respraying have spiralled though because of environmental protection requirements and spraying at home by yourself is far from easy.

NOHOME P P
O, ON, Canada   CAN
1967 MG MGB GT "Maggie (GT From Hell)"
When fixing rust is not your idea of a good time.

You don't fix rusty cars because it is a good idea, financially or otherwise, you do it because you can.

Pete

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