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mgbal Ray D
Adelaide, SA, Australia   AUS
Hey guys. just a quick question is it possible to make a MG motor oil leak proof ??
my motor has not been touched in quite some time. it does get used at least twice a week. but it now leaks oil from every where.
front seal,back seal ,engine side plates tappet cover. and a few places I can't find.
it does not use a lot of oil between services which is every 12 months or 12000 miles.
it has always leaked oil around front seal since I have owned it which is quite some time but in the last 6 months oil just seems to be coming from every where. Up side motor runs like a dream no smoke coming from motor plenty of power, economical.
Should I take the line if it ain't broke don't fix it. or bite the bullet and fix it.
Any comments appreciated

Ray.

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HiPowerShooter Avatar
HiPowerShooter Gold Member James Booker
Lake Winneconne, WI, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB
Yes.

I've used THIS ATP-205 in two of my daughters cars now. One was a Ford Focus, the other a VW. The Focus was raining oil and it definitley made a difference. The other wasn't as bad and sealed it completely(valve cover). I won't claim it'll work miracles but can say for sure it will work on small leaks.

Doesn't appear to "swell" seals, just seems to condition them and make them pliable again.



"One test is worth a thousand expert opinions"--Alvin "Tex" Johnston...Boeing test pilot.

"Who do you think you are? I am."...Pete Weber

73 MGB. Tires: Round, black, hold air. Oil: Sometimes old, sometimes new...always slippery. Oil filter: Yellow, usually full of oil. Carbs: 2 SU HIF. Distributor: Yes. Headlights: Not that bright but bright enough. A bunch of other stuff most cars have but not really important enough to itemize. Oh, wait...it has a cool sounding exhaust with stickers on the chrome tips. Really slays the ladies...

Donthuis Avatar
Donthuis Don van Riet
Rijswijk, ZH, Netherlands   NLD
I fought oil leaks in vain on my engine for 2 years, before throwing in the towel and ordering an exchange engine from Ivor Searl (which is suprisingly fully leakfree)
But a thorough dismantling action with complete renewal of gaskets and seals can be an alternative. I just lost the stomach for it (but bought all the parts before, lots of it unused now) eye rolling smiley

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Aussie77RBB Avatar
Aussie77RBB Silver Member Paul C
LANDSBOROUGH, Queensland, Australia   AUS
1977 MG MGB
Ray,
Not to mention the front gearbox seal/gasket, allowing the oil to leak out at bell housing.

With my RBB, when I first pulled the lump and box out, I identified the leaks, tappet covers, rocker cover and gearbox seal- fixed all of them fairly quickly, and have not had any leaks since, except for operator error when doing valve clearance recently. Didn’t notice the gasket had slipped in a small area above #2, and managed to leave a puddle on the service station driveway when fuelling up. Embarrassed and quickly wiped it up before leaving.

Don,

we know its in the code for British cars to leak oil! It is satisfying to stop the leaks, one way or another. Where is Ivor Searl?

smileys with beer



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-09 05:09 AM by Aussie77RBB.

allanreeling ALLAN R
RANDLAY, TELFORD, Shropshire, UK   GBR
Just a few points.
Timing chain seal leaks.1. Wear ridge in the pulley mating surface. Can be sorted easily with a SuperSleeve. 2. The timing cover was not centred when re-fitted at some time. This is a common cause 3. Positive crankcase pressure, blowing it out. Back crank seal also. Check the breathers.
Sump. The pan is more often than not, distorted by over tightening. That stiffening ridge between the holes isn't really up to it and when the gaskets start to weep the temptation is always to nip up the screws. When I had 1800's I did consider making strengthening pieces or even a frame, to tack on pan, and even a touch convex between the holes. I never got round to it before I went V8!
Tappet chest covers. Again over-tightening distorts the covers. The cork gaskets are not good. There are better silicone gaskets but they're all the same size strangely, and don't fit the front cover very well and need stretching and glueing in place.
1st. Check the crankcase breathing, whatever method is used on you engine.
2nd Look at the front pulley for a deep wear ridge.
3rd. If you do take the front pulley out, it's worth taking the front cover off, replacing the lip seal and gasket and centering it on the pulley before nipping up the cover bolts.



soonerv8

riley1489 Avatar
riley1489 Gold Member Bruce H
Great White North, QC, Canada   CAN
1953 Jaguar XK120
1959 Riley 1.5 "King George"
1973 MG MGB
In reply to # 3888330 by mgbal Should I take the line if it ain't broke don't fix it. or bite the bullet and fix it.

But your post clearly states it is 'broken', so yes it merits fixing.

Changing a gasket shouldn't interfere with any mechanical operation of the engine. Buy the gaskets/seals as you see fit, replace them one at a time so as to not loose road time.
The oil 'leaks' can be reduced and often eliminated. Use some smarts, good gaskets, sealant if desired and have at it

You don't mention what model year engine you have. Early engines do not have a 'proper' rear oil seal at the crankshaft.

B



Check your ego Amigo!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-09 08:19 AM by riley1489.

mgblestyle Avatar
mgblestyle Philip Shave
Olympia, WA, USA   USA
Ray, the answer is "yes" they can be made leak-free. The answers to individual leak points are on the forum in various posts--tappet covers, front covers, etc. The easy fixes are the valve cover gasket, snugging up the oil filter housing bolt, tightening the oil pipe/hose to the filter housing, tightening the oil pressure relief cap and the bolt above it (copper washers here), gently snug/check the pan bolts. Harder to get to are the tappet covers which will need new gaskets and rubber bolt seals under cup washers. The timing cover seal can be done in-place and if done carefully won't leak at all. If the rear main is leaking you must pull the engine--a note, if the oil dripping from the bell housing drain is totally clear then it's coming from the transmission front cover or seal.

I think one of the keys to a dry engine is the use of silicone Permatex Ultra Black on paper gaskets. The choice of quality front and rear seals, like the best Viton rear main will make these last. Sometimes, just tightening the joints that use a copper washer will seal them but if not you may have to use new washers. If you're unconventional the oil pan can be installed without a gasket, just the Ultra Black, but I wouldn't attempt this with the engine in place.

On the front cover, if you find a groove worn in the balancer, you can Speedi-sleeve it as Alan notes, or even better, now you can replace it with a new balancer for only about $80 US. Again, as Alan has already noted, best results on the front cover require that you remove the cover so you can obtain good alignment of the balancer-seal.

There is nothing inherent in an MGB 1800 that good gaskets, modern sealers and premium front/rear seals won't fix. You can have a clean garage! Phil

jseabolt Avatar
jseabolt James Seabolt
Mount Carmel, TN, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB
My engine is covered in oil but I think it's due to the valve cover gasket.

I noticed there is a box on the driver's side with a hose coming off of it going straight to the ground. Is this thing an liquid/vapor separator or more like a PVC valve? What is inside it?

Is it worth the effort to remove this box and soak it in gasoline or kerosene to remove any gunk buildup? Assuming the engine is 42+ years old and it's never been cleaned?

I was planning on routing it to the air cleaner. I'm not much on venting oil vapors to the atmosphere. Every car I did this to, my clothing ends up smelling like motor oil after I drive it.

Gasket material:

I realize this is not something that autoparts stock but I work at a chemical plant and have access to GoreTex gasket material. The same stuff used in shoes. If you have an oil leak that you can't seem to seal this stuff will work. Such as a warped oil pan or valve cover or a pitted surface like a thermostat housing.

I made virtually every gasket on my Yugo engine out of this stuff. Everything except for the cambox to head gasket (because it would throw the valve lash off being too thick) and the exhaust manifold gaskets. I think it's only rated to around 600F.

Fiat/Yugos are bad about the oil pan gaskets leaking and one day found a large enough scrape piece to make one out of and now no more leaks.

It's also easy to cut. The other good thing about this stuff is once you make a gasket, you can unbolt it and reuse the gasket over and over. Such as the thermostat housing. If for some reason you wanted to replace the thermostat 50 times, the gasket won't fall apart and can be reused. The reason I know this is we have to replace these filter elements in my my area about once a week and they have been using the same gasket material over and over again for years. And the filter pressure can get as high as 250 lbs.

I'm planning on using this UHF tape for the valve cover, thermostat housing on my differential cover which I did once before on a Ford Explorer. I also used this material for valve covers on lawnmowers. Why factories use this RTV sealant is beyond me. I guess it's quick and dirty. Last time I did a valve adjustment on a B&S engine, it took longer to scrape this crap off than it did to make a new gasket and adjust the valves and get the engine running!

If anybody is interested, you should be able to get this stuff from McMaster Carr.

https://www.mp-sealing.com/inertex-uhf-gasket-tape/

https://www.ameraflex.com/sheet.html



http://s222.photobucket.com/user/turbofiat/library/?sort=2&page=0

1977 MGB
1980 Fiat 124 Spider (turbo)
1987 Yugo (1500 turbo)
1981 Trabant 601
1987 Citroen 2CV
1968 Ford Fairlane 500

riley1489 Avatar
riley1489 Gold Member Bruce H
Great White North, QC, Canada   CAN
1953 Jaguar XK120
1959 Riley 1.5 "King George"
1973 MG MGB
In reply to # 3888425 by jseabolt I noticed there is a box on the driver's side with a hose coming off of it going straight to the ground. Is this thing an liquid/vapor separator or more like a PVC valve? What is inside it?

Is it worth the effort to remove this box and soak it in gasoline or kerosene to remove any gunk buildup?

I will guess from your description that you are describing the front tappet cover? (below) This is an integral part of the crankcase venting, should be connected to your air intake in order to burn up oil vapours/crankcase gasses in the normal combustion. The hose to atmosphere you describe is a PO bodge.

This cover has a 'matrix' inside that acts as an oil separator. Yes if this has been neglected then remove it and soak it in a cleaner. Lightly blow air through it to ensure it is clean. Re install with a new gasket and seal on the center bolt.

I suggest you clean off the outside of your engine to determine where these leak (s) are originating.

B



Check your ego Amigo!


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Gerald O Avatar
Gerald O Gerald O'Docharty
Wake Forest, North Carolina, USA   USA
1978 MG MGB
A working PCV is a must for helping to keep the engine leak-free. All engines are going to put pressure into the crankcase from combustion blow-by. If the crankcase becomes pressurised then this will tend to force oil out through seals and gaskets while running. A working PCV system diverts a metered amount of intake vacuum to the crankcase, resulting in a slight negative pressure to counteract the positive blow-by pressure. An atmospheric vent can only achieve neutral pressure, whereas a PCV can result in a slight vacuum in the crankcase that will actually draw air in through any leaking spots. You can imsgine the effect this will have at locations where there are seals and gaskets.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-09 09:43 AM by Gerald O.

jseabolt Avatar
jseabolt James Seabolt
Mount Carmel, TN, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB
In reply to # 3888447 by riley1489
In reply to # 3888425 by jseabolt I noticed there is a box on the driver's side with a hose coming off of it going straight to the ground. Is this thing an liquid/vapor separator or more like a PVC valve? What is inside it?

Is it worth the effort to remove this box and soak it in gasoline or kerosene to remove any gunk buildup?

I will guess from your description that you are describing the front tappet cover? (below) This is an integral part of the crankcase venting, should be connected to your air intake in order to burn up oil vapours/crankcase gasses in the normal combustion. The hose to atmosphere you describe is a PO bodge.

This cover has a 'matrix' inside that acts as an oil separator. Yes if this has been neglected then remove it and soak it in a cleaner. Lightly blow air through it to ensure it is clean. Re install with a new gasket and seal on the center bolt.

I suggest you clean off the outside of your engine to determine where these leak (s) are originating.

B

Yes that's the part I was talking about. Not to stray off MGBs but when I seen this part, it reminded me of the same thing used on (at least) Briggs and Stratton engines that vents oil fumes through a tube into the air cleaner.





I had an 8 HP vertical shaft that was blowing oil all over the engine. This part has a diagram inside it and if it busts, the intake system will suck oil up through the hose, into the air cleaner then spill over. Then the flywheel's cooling fins will then blow it all over the engine.


No doubt if this box is clogged up it could force oil out the valve cover gasket.



http://s222.photobucket.com/user/turbofiat/library/?sort=2&page=0

1977 MGB
1980 Fiat 124 Spider (turbo)
1987 Yugo (1500 turbo)
1981 Trabant 601
1987 Citroen 2CV
1968 Ford Fairlane 500



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-09 10:27 AM by jseabolt.

Donthuis Avatar
Donthuis Don van Riet
Rijswijk, ZH, Netherlands   NLD
In the UK and they are probably an off-shoot of the original engine refurbishing companies that produced these "Gold Seal" units of which I had two in my B over 40 years of ownership.

They refurbished the block I now have mounted to a 18V 1971-1974 spec (European by definition). The 48G733 /18V779/790 equivalent "Gold Seal" block I sent in return was from the same period. Probably they will only supply a later RBB 18V block type if the engine received in return is of the same later type (or ask extra payment for a head with the earlier, larger valves, who knows?). Pistons will always be renewed so any change in piston shape should not lead to exchange problems. P&P of such heavy blocks to outside Europe may however... eye rolling smiley.

Anyhow, advancing age and restricted possibilities for working on the engine oil leaks myself led to engagement of my MG specialist garage. Once counting the hours to be spent, renewing the block instead of just solving the gasket/seal oil leakage by many hours of labour on a block approaching 80k kms in 28 years made more sense and of course leadfree is a standard in such engines.

This thread contains a lot of actions now, many of which I also performed. I do not have much to add to them, start with carter ventilation, especially renewing the old hoses and take it from there. Personally I found the silicone gasket under my alloy valve cover also a worthwhile improvement over the cork one. But those two are the easiest ones to start with. Succes! smileys with beer

PS I also had an enormous oil leak from my 4sync/OD gearbox, solved by this garage during the same process (possibly made worse by some of the earlier seal renewal actions of mine sad smiley )
Lying on your back under a raised B, with only limited space between your face and the carbody is acceptable for simple jobs, but with the oil leaks time was up for me .......

In reply to # 3888359 by Aussie77RBB Ray,
Not to mention the front gearbox seal/gasket, allowing the oil to leak out at bell housing.

With my RBB, when I first pulled the lump and box out, I identified the leaks, tappet covers, rocker cover and gearbox seal- fixed all of them fairly quickly, and have not had any leaks since, except for operator error when doing valve clearance recently. Didn’t notice the gasket had slipped in a small area above #2, and managed to leave a puddle on the service station driveway when fuelling up. Embarrassed and quickly wiped it up before leaving.

Don,

we know its in the code for British cars to leak oil! It is satisfying to stop the leaks, one way or another. Where is Ivor Searl?

smileys with beer



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-09 11:05 AM by Donthuis.

Nicecar Avatar
Nicecar Gary (ex "Harv") G
Victoria, BC, Canada   CAN
1980 MG MGB "Red On Red On Red"
"is it possible to make a MG motor oil leak proof?"

I asked this same question here some years ago, and got less than + answers, but I proceeded, and if I have anything now it's truly minor.

Oil filter fits on a housing that attaches to block. The 2" recessed gasket is probably rock hard, and a bitch to get out, but can and should be done.

Side cover gaskets - lots of talk here in past.

Silicone valve cover.

These three things can be done without pulling engine. Another is rear main seal. If you don't have OD (3+4), good idea to source one, and add new seal, and easier to access side covers.

Gerald: How does one ascertain a working PVC?

melbaver Avatar
melbaver Gold Member Chris Howells
Carrington, NSW, Australia   AUS
1968 MG MGB "Moneypit"
2012 Dodge Journey "Another Shopping Trolley"
Short answer is no, but it is believed that some renovations have been built from the leak up.



Chris Howells

1968 MGB Purchased already dis-assembled but which is largely back together so I'm a lot less ignorant.

Brightguy Avatar
Brightguy David Sippola
Lawrenceburg, IN, USA   USA
1976 MG MGB MkIII "TBD"
When I first pulled my B into the garage last October it proceeded to puke 3 quarts of motor oil onto the floor. The differential axle and pinion seals leaked along with the rear wheel cylinders, as well as the transmission output shaft. Over the last few months I have replaced all the leaking seals and various gaskets. The most troublesome one was the front tappet galley cover. I tried silicone gaskets, set with RTV the night before, used the rear cover to hold the seal in place while the RTV cured, leaked right away. Small MGA cork gasket, couldn't even get it to seat. Finally cut my own out of 1/16" paper gasket, two layers with a thin, but complete layer of RTV on all surfaces. Replaced valve cover mounting bolt grommets, and at this time I have no engine leaks, no differential leaks, only a small tranny leak which I will attend to when the weather warms up.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-10 10:11 AM by Brightguy.

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