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Cyl block damage repairable after blown head gasket ?

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Nickh6511 Avatar
Nickh6511 Geoffrey Huggonson
Orleans, France   FRA
Hi, my first post!

After some bad running and overheating on the road back from buying the car (!), I found the distributor had come loose and turned putting the timing out.
Set it back and tightened it up, and all was fine for 500 miles until started running rough and overheating again.
Tested compression to find 50 50 120 120. Not so good.
Took head off to find the gasket blown between 1&2 and 3&4. Yippee, it's only that! But no....
Looked at block to see a damage between 1&2, like a flame path.
The block is 2000cc, looks like linered.

Does anyone know of a way to repair without machining (means without taking the engine out)?
Or is even machining possible in this state?
Or what other options please?

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chris Avatar
chris Platinum Member Chris Roop
Pendleton, OR, USA   USA
I know of no repair method that is cost effective. With Chevy's, you pull everything out of the engine, then get another block. It would seem the same plan would work for MGs.


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Rick Fawthrop Avatar
Rick Fawthrop Richard Fawthrop
Langley, WA, USA   USA
Replace the engine.

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dickmoritz Avatar
dickmoritz Platinum Member Dick Moritz
Philly 'burbs, PA, USA   USA
Given the scuffing and scoring in the cylinder shown in your photo, you're likely due for new liners as well as an attempted repair to that block. Given the costs involved in repairing that block and the wide availability of other engine blocks, suggest you start with a newer/better block...

Dick



Errabundi Saepe, Semper Certi
(Often wrong, but always certain)

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chris Avatar
chris Platinum Member Chris Roop
Pendleton, OR, USA   USA
And this is exactly why we don't drive a car that has just blown the head gasket. Someone was asking about this just the other day.


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Rick Fawthrop Avatar
Rick Fawthrop Richard Fawthrop
Langley, WA, USA   USA
I think the simplest solution is to order an exchange engine from MGOC.
This is not a very good welcome to MG ownership.

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riley1489 Avatar
riley1489 Gold Member Bruce H
Great White North, QC, Canada   CAN
1953 Jaguar XK120
1959 Riley 1.5 "King George"
1973 MG MGB
Bugger!

and a 2000cc block at that



B



Check your ego Amigo!

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riley1489 Avatar
riley1489 Gold Member Bruce H
Great White North, QC, Canada   CAN
1953 Jaguar XK120
1959 Riley 1.5 "King George"
1973 MG MGB
Bugger!

and a 2000cc block at that


B



Check your ego Amigo!

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HiPowerShooter Avatar
HiPowerShooter Gold Member James Booker
Lake Winneconne, WI, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB
The block will need to be removed regardless whether you attempt a repair or replace it. Nothing can be done in place to even attempt a fix...although I'm not sure what they can do at this point. I'm sure there is a remedy...but at what cost? Much easier and probably cost effective to find another block and build it.

Then again...there's always "block paste". It's basically JBWeld in toothpaste form. We use it at the shop on old pitted obsolete engines which MUST be "fixed". I've seen it patch small imperfections on the decks of engines which cannot be replace without a lot of hassle and a lot of money. Mostly for relatively low pressure areas...it would most likely not withstand the high pressure/heat of that particular location though. Other than that...cut/weld/grind but again, you're talking more money than a new block but could be done in car I suppose. Not recommending any of those...but just possibilities.



"One test is worth a thousand expert opinions"--Alvin "Tex" Johnston...Boeing test pilot.

"Who do you think you are? I am."...Pete Weber

73 MGB. Tires: Round, black, hold air. Oil: Sometimes old, sometimes new...always slippery. Oil filter: Yellow, usually full of oil. Carbs: 2 SU HIF. Distributor: Yes. Headlights: Not that bright but bright enough. A bunch of other stuff most cars have but not really important enough to itemize. Oh, wait...it has a cool sounding exhaust with stickers on the chrome tips. Really slays the ladies...

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geezer Avatar
geezer Silver Member charles durning
Magee, MS, USA   USA
1958 MG Magnette ZB "Chick Magnette (sold)"
1967 Morris Minor 1000 Saloon (2-door) "Marvin"
1974 MG MGB GT "Foghorn Leghorn"
Block paste does work. However in that location you will have to sleeve the cylinders first with a thick wall sleeve. A thin wall sleeve will just burn out again.



"Whether you think you can do something, or you think you can't, you're correct"- Henry Ford

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pinkyponk Avatar
pinkyponk Gold Member Adrian Page
Berwick, NS, Canada   CAN
If those are steel liners weld it... in place, (maybe bronze even) file it flat, and try it with a new head gasket. It just needs to seal the chambers... the rings don't get up that high. If it works you're a hero... if not you tried your best and lost a 20 dollar head gasket in the name of science.

Adrian



Home built Eaton M62 Supercharger with 7.6psi boost, 8:1 compression, custom "supercharger" cam from Schneider Cams, Mikuni HSR48 Carburetor, Chevy Cavalier 1.6 rocker arms, Maxspeeding rods with Teflon wrist pin buttons, custom aluminum cold air intake, CB Performance computerized ignition, Fidanza 9 pound flywheel, 1.44 exhaust valves in 48cc chamber head, matched manifolds, 2 1/4" exhaust system.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-04-30 02:53 PM by pinkyponk.

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Perdido Avatar
Perdido Gold Member Rut Rutledge
Tuscaloosa, AL, USA   USA
In reply to # 3727269 by pinkyponk If those are steel liners weld it... in place, file it flat, and try it with a new head gasket. It just needs to seal the chambers... the rings don't get up that high. If it works you're a hero... if not you tried your best and lost a 20 dollar head gasket in the name of science.

Adrian

Being a cheap a$$, I would be inclined to try what Adrian suggests before I pulled the engine.
Rut



1960 Bugeye undergoing restoration, 1275
1970 MGB, Pale Primrose
1967 Triumph TR4a
1966 Triumph TR4a
When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down 'happy'. They told me I didn't understand the assignment, and I told them they didn't understand life. John Lennon

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33EJB Avatar
33EJB Tim C
LS, Eastern Ontario, Canada   CAN
1969 MG MGB
I would definitely try to weld it and file it flat as suggested by Adrian. Nothing to lose and it just might work.

Just looking at the scoring and scuffing of the liner in your photo, you have an engine rebuild in your future in any case. If your welding job DOES work you can drive the car while you look around for a different block in the meantime, at your leisure. Lots of good deals around on engines in need of a rebuild (check the buy/sell/trade forum here) if you have the time to look for a suitable candidate.

Nice clear photos of the damage, BTW. Makes it easier for armchair "experts" like me to offer an opinion.**


**note: full disclosure: I am NOT an expert, armchair or otherwise.

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HiPowerShooter Avatar
HiPowerShooter Gold Member James Booker
Lake Winneconne, WI, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB
Now that I'm on my 'puter...and can get a better look...I think doing what Adrian recommended will work. The clamping force of the head, the sealing ability of a Viton coated gasket will almost certainly work. I thought it was a bit deeper than it appears to be.

As suggested...if it works, it works and you'll be out $40 or so. If not...well you'll just be back to where you started.

Good luck!



"One test is worth a thousand expert opinions"--Alvin "Tex" Johnston...Boeing test pilot.

"Who do you think you are? I am."...Pete Weber

73 MGB. Tires: Round, black, hold air. Oil: Sometimes old, sometimes new...always slippery. Oil filter: Yellow, usually full of oil. Carbs: 2 SU HIF. Distributor: Yes. Headlights: Not that bright but bright enough. A bunch of other stuff most cars have but not really important enough to itemize. Oh, wait...it has a cool sounding exhaust with stickers on the chrome tips. Really slays the ladies...

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pinkyponk Avatar
pinkyponk Gold Member Adrian Page
Berwick, NS, Canada   CAN
I'm not sure I'm comfortable being described as recommending it. grinning smiley I certainly suggested it... and I would do it myself, if it was my block. Geoffrey needs to look into it, think about it, and decide for himself.

I'm thinking bronze would do the trick and be easy to get off later on... if need be.

Adrian



Home built Eaton M62 Supercharger with 7.6psi boost, 8:1 compression, custom "supercharger" cam from Schneider Cams, Mikuni HSR48 Carburetor, Chevy Cavalier 1.6 rocker arms, Maxspeeding rods with Teflon wrist pin buttons, custom aluminum cold air intake, CB Performance computerized ignition, Fidanza 9 pound flywheel, 1.44 exhaust valves in 48cc chamber head, matched manifolds, 2 1/4" exhaust system.

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