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Body work vs lung damage, beyond N95 mask

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three5bangers Avatar
three5bangers Steve M
Valhalla, NY, USA   USA
Well I've been mostly a wrench-er but the MGA will need a fair amount of abrasion work, surface rust removal (frame, trunk) welding., painting. To date the most I've used is N95 dust masks and carbon filtery $35 masks for paint fumes. How bad is welding? NObody seems to wear a mask while welding. I've seen $1000 fresh air pump mask for painting. I could see myself trying that for fumes. The N95 masks of course are rated in % of dust that gets through the mask. I seem to be sensitive to dust, sometimes coughing a bit for a few days after some work. I don't have a lot of rust, painting equipment yet but I'm thinking a blast cabinet will definitely be needed but rust removal on the frame will be out in the open. How do you folks stay healthy?

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wyatt Avatar
wyatt Silver Member Wyatt W
penguin point, drift ice, Antarctica   ATA
...we don't, I rarely used a mask in 40 years of painting/grindind/bondoing drywalling,until the last few years, never used a helmet for welding, it was the look don't look method, never used welders glasses for oxy/acte, never wore ear plugs with tools....it's called old school stupid...Oh btw smoked luckys and pall mall non filters for 44 years...quit a few years ago...I actually seem fairly healthy except for arthritis and hearing....btw this s not a Frank Sinatra endorsement of "I did it my way"...smoking smiley

dickmoritz Avatar
dickmoritz Platinum Member Dick Moritz
Philly 'burbs, PA, USA   USA
Well that certainly explains why you turned out the way you did... hot smiley

Dick



In reply to # 3879807 by wyatt ...we don't, I rarely used a mask in 40 years of painting/grindind/bondoing drywalling,until the last few years, never used a helmet for welding, it was the look don't look method, never used welders glasses for oxy/acte, never wore ear plugs with tools....it's called old school stupid...Oh btw smoked luckys and pall mall non filters for 44 years...quit a few years ago...I actually seem fairly healthy except for arthritis and hearing....btw this s not a Frank Sinatra endorsement of "I did it my way"...smoking smiley



Errabundi Saepe, Semper Certi
(Often wrong, but always certain)

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Grubeguy Avatar
Grubeguy Gold Member Grube Guy
Washington, DC, USA   USA
I use a particulate mask when I sand now - I didn't used to, and at the end of the day, I'd be blowing mud puddles out of my sinuses. I can't imagine how my lungs fared. When I prime, I use a mask as well, but when I paint, the different mask I use cuts out the solvents (I don't put much of the paint into the air, using an HVLP rig.

I wear a full hood when I weld, having learned the hard way that goggles only allows me to get a helluva sun burn in no time flat. When I grind or use something super loud, I use ear buds, covered over with noise cancelling headphones. That combo allows me to work plus listen to an audio book without having to strain to hear the thing.

watsonrx13 Rob Watson
Plant City, FL, USA   USA
1960 MG MGA
The only time I use a mask is when working with Aircraft stripper. I use a full face welding helmet when welding. When working on the car, I wear a skull cap and safety glasses. I tend to get particulates in my eyes, bothering me more that the particulates in my nose. No face mask for painting, I'm only use rattle can. Anytime I pick up an electric tool, I always put on a pair of leather gloves. I wear latex gloves for rattle can painting, mixing/applying body filler and aircraft stripper.

MGAdavid Avatar
MGAdavid David Werblow
Portland, CT, USA   USA
1954 MG TF
1959 MG MGA
When grinding off Bondo, paint and rust you are asking for trouble if you are not using the best mask you can find.

tjt77 timothy Trevithick
Grass Valley, CA, USA   USA
almost everyone I have known that does car restoration work which includes painting has failed to make it to mid way through thier 6th decade.. I think its VERY important to wear appropriate masks and PROTECTIVE SUITING when working with meterials that scatter into the air.. solvents are notorious bedfellows with cancer.. as are almost all modern paints ( water based MAY be an exception.. unsure.. ALWAYS use caution) the real dirty stuff that gets everywhere when doing rust repairs or restoring chassis components may not be able to penetrate deep into lung tissue..but it does lodge in nose and throat..
I personally will NOT paint any larger items such as panels without a body suit and appropriate mask.. Im not as cautious with rattle cars ( but really should take more care)
It really depends upon how long you wish to live and what level os suffering and disability you are prepared to put up with as the years take thier inevitable toll..
Bing an asthma sufferer ensures I take caution.. and hence masks are mandatory.. Im truly alarmed at how lax some people are however.. its your life.. try and be smart to make the most of it and take precaution when working with car stuff.. almost everything that gets airborne when we works on out projects is nasty.. Use your head and be smart about it..

three5bangers Avatar
three5bangers Steve M
Valhalla, NY, USA   USA
I think I'll proceed full blown caution. I searched amazon on N95 and there is a whole world of masks out there, including N99 masks and 3M brand masks that are even called 'welding masks'. That must be to filter dust and a bit of dangerous chemicals. I love my lungs!! I don't like volatile organic chemicals either. I'll have to fork out the $$ or maybe cut back on restoration quality (paint over rust) or find a shop to blast my frame and use a 2 stage paint. I have to learn a bit of welding so i can take the roadster body off the frame. The body will fold in half if i just pull it up.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-26 05:23 PM by three5bangers.

Wray Avatar
Wray Gold Member Wray Lemke
., SC, USA   USA
Look for a NIOSH approved respirator for paints, etc. They have a cartridge life of around 40 hours of being exposed. This means the clock is running when you take them out of the bag they are stored in, so use them them put them back in the resealable bag. After 40 hours out of the bag, toss the mask and get a new one.

If you check your local autobody supply you can get them for less than $20. They are approved for pretty much anything including organics.

59Coupe Wayne Stambaugh
Montgomery, AL, USA   USA
Yes there are hazards no matter what you are doing. If you are making dust, smoke, gases etc protect yourself reasonably. Don't let this get out of hand and stop you from doing what you love to do. There will always be a little risk involved. One thing to remember, you probably can't do the job if you are outfitted like the OSHA cowboy. Just take reasonable precautions before you start working. See link below

https://ehssafetynews.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/osha_cowboy.jpg

aeroshadow Alex B
Port Dover, ON, Canada   CAN
there are thinner flat cartridges ( the purple ones that thread on ) for some masks you can get that fit under a full face welding helmet. Saves a sinus headache the next day & hopefully helps reduce the longer term lung issues.

bobs77vet Avatar
bobs77vet bob K.
northern Va, VA, USA   USA
I use a high quality face mask when making dust......I use a full face shield when using a grinder, I use a full face mask in well ventilated area when I weld and I don't weld galvanized steel unless I have to. I use leather gloves and a full leather apron, and leather sleeves when I need to.

I take safety seriously, I don't get under a car without safety glasses on

gary s Avatar
gary s Gary Starr
N Illnois, USA   USA
For painting about 10 years ago I bought a Hobbyair system. My Mom had come down with pulmonary fibrosis,I saw first hand what it did. Not an inexpensive system but cheap comparatively. For sanding,wire wheeling or using my blast cabinet I use a regular cartridge mask. When I first got the Hobbyair I was too lazy/didn't know that with the two hose length system even if you don't need the length you must connect both hoses. I only connected one,the air coming into the mask was hot,not bad on a cool day but mid 70's up- forget it. I called them they advised use both hose lengths it helps cool the air down. Don't know how this works on the single hose systems. I Imron'd a 20 foot boat in my garage one year at the end of August. I left one coil of hose in a wash tub of water which really helped. Water actually got hot so I just changed it several times during the job.

three5bangers Avatar
three5bangers Steve M
Valhalla, NY, USA   USA
In reply to # 3887227 by gary s For painting about 10 years ago I bought a Hobbyair system.

I think I might go for something like this. I saw one system once in a SUmmit Racing brochure, i bet it was even more expensive. I was guessing I might use such a system even for sanding. I had no idea that heat was such an issue. Hobbyair is now on my radar. I had seen a youtube video or 2 where high general ventilation is recommended during welding. Thank you Gary.

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