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Rover V8: Measurement needed.

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Walrus1954 Avatar
Walrus1954 Neil Peniston
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
Hi All.

I would appreciate it if some one who has done a Rover V8 conversion could measure the distance from the outer aspect of the cylinder head (front of the engine) to the top of the frame rail. I need the measurement from the bottom of the head i.e. where it meets the block.
Obviously this will vary depending on the height of the engine relative to the front cross member. I would appreciate measurement from several members so that I can get an average.

Thanks, NP.

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Simon Austin Avatar
I'll get measurements off both cars, Neil. They're using different mounts so the height will be different.

Stand by...



"Speed costs........how fast you want to spend?"

Walrus1954 Avatar
Walrus1954 Neil Peniston
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
Thanks Simon...I was hoping you would respond.

Cheers, Neil.

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Simon Austin Avatar
Happy to help, Neil. This photo is off the GT DS. Hopefully it’s the point you’re looking for. The PS is about 1/2” lower.

The BV8 sits about 1/2” higher than the GT on both sides.

To summarize:

GT DS: 3.5” to lowest part of head. PS 3”

BV8: 4” & 3.5” respectively.

Let me know if you need any other measurements. Can I ask why you’re inquiring?



"Speed costs........how fast you want to spend?"


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Walrus1954 Avatar
Walrus1954 Neil Peniston
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
Thank again Simon. That is exactly what I wanted to know.

The reason for asking is that I am going the route that Jim Blackwood went, i.e. using cylinder head mounts. I am in the process of making a mock up of the mounts and just needed a ball park figure.


Just for interest sake I have included a picture of the motor. Obviously the headers will have to be modified to fit it into the GT.

Cheers, Neil.


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Simon Austin Avatar
You're welcome, Neil. I'll be interested to read what other measurements you get. thumbs up



"Speed costs........how fast you want to spend?"

malski Avatar
malski Peter Malkin
Bright, N.E.Victoria, Australia   AUS
Neil
My GTV8 conversion (3.5L Rover) measures 3.75” from top lip of frame rail which is about 0.75” high - so 4.5” from top of frame rail. By memory I used Clive Wheatley’s mounts.



Peter Malkin
NE Victoria
Australia
MGBGTV8 (1977)
MGB Roadster (1967) Supercharged - under restoration
MGTC (1949)

allanreeling ALLAN R
RANDLAY, TELFORD, Shropshire, UK   GBR
Mine is 31/4", but as I started off with an Edelbrock and low rider filter, I got a bit obsessive about bonnet clearance and the mounts have sagged a bit too.



soonerv8

Walrus1954 Avatar
Walrus1954 Neil Peniston
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
Gentlemen, Thank you for your responses.

Peter-Sherman Avatar
Peter-Sherman Peter Sherman
Melbourne, Australia   AUS
If you stick with the original rubber bumper frame mounts the principle restriction on how low you can get the motor is determined by motor mount, plus rubber mount thickness. Not enough room between rail and engine. If however you move the frame mounts back a bit to a wider location, or mount down onto the crossmemeber ,you can find another inch. Depends on local regulations how far you can deviate from factory. . Basically MG didn't chose the best location to put the engine mount brackets. Even has the steering shaft running through one.

V8MGBV8 Avatar
V8MGBV8 Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN, USA   USA
In reply to # 3835372 by Peter-Sherman If you stick with the original rubber bumper frame mounts the principle restriction on how low you can get the motor is determined by motor mount, plus rubber mount thickness.

And, if using a block hugger header, the header hitting the steering shaft.

Walrus1954 Avatar
Walrus1954 Neil Peniston
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
None of this applies if you are using cylinder head to frame mounts.

Cheers NP.

V8MGBV8 Avatar
V8MGBV8 Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN, USA   USA
The sagging stock rubber mounts may not, but the block hugger to steering shaft clearance will come into play when trying to get the engine as low as possible.

Morty Avatar
Morty Shawn Morton
Calgary, AB, Canada   CAN
Neil

I just received an email from Henri about this thread, unfortunatly tonight I pulled my engine so I can't provide much help with measurements. I am however intreged by the idea of using the cylinder heads to mount the engine! one of my engine mounts is pretty saggy. I will defiantly be researching that as an option. I'm in the NW of Calgary if you ever need some show and tell time but it sounds like you have things well in hand.

Shawn


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Jim Blackwood Avatar
Jim Blackwood * BlownMGB-V8
Gunpowder Rd, Florence, KY, USA   USA
Head to frame mounts are simple in concept, easy to fabricate, and cheap to implement. They look good, work well, control torque, and make engine removal and height adjustment a breeze. Cushions from McMasterCarr are about $10 each and available in a couple of different durometers. Materials include some 3/16" plate (I like stainless for this but mild steel works fine), a bit of pipe or tubing, a couple of long bolts some fender washers, and a holesaw. It's best to drill a pilot hole thru for the holesaw as there is an intermediate layer you sometimes hit the edge of, which is why you are using the holesaw in the first place.

Any accessories have to be relocated enough to account for the mount thickness, usually not a problem. I use pasteboard for templates. A small ball peen hammer transfers the bolt locations quite well. Put a 3/8" plywood spacer under the pan and if you can leave room for a hockey puck type spacer under the cushion it gives flexibility for additional lowering if desired later. More fender washers or other spacers can be added for raising. Try to include space for a wiring harness to snake past between mount and fender (another use of the lower spacer).

You position the engine, make up the head brackets with a simple "L" bend and a gusset, insert the mount with inside spacer, bolt it all up and mark the frame. Take it back out, pilot drill, hole saw, insert tube, weld, weld top washer to the frame for reinforcement (fender washer or heavy washer your choice). Clean, paint, done. Bolt it all up.

I usually extend the tube a little below the frame rail, maybe 1/4" as it makes it easy to weld. Drop the bolt in from the top and put the nut on the bottom. The tube should extend through any lower spacer and the cushions have an internal spacer. Rubber above and below the "L" bracket, fender washer on top. I use stainless fender washers for appearance, they aren't that expensive.

Jim

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