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Connecting rods, TC

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TD4834 Avatar
TD4834 Bill Chasser
Sacramento, CA, USA   USA
I am in total agreement regarding pressure. It should be noted that the XPAG pumps are designed as a high volume and not a high pressure pump. I will add that Trying to increase pressures in effect will lower the volume delivery efficiency. It is a matter of fluid dynamics. It is much more important to have volume over pressure as it helps to also cool parts and thus minimizing friction.

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Steve S Avatar
On The Road, Lost in So Cal, USA   USA
Absolutely. Too often people obsess over low pressure when volume is more important. I knew a guy who ran 100psi in his TC happily. It took three of us to convince him it was a bad idea. So long as I see at least 40 psi at moderate highway speeds, I'm content.

condor1 Terrance Thames (Disabled)
Disabled Account, Antarctica   ATA
In reply to # 3599223 by Steve S Absolutely. Too often people obsess over low pressure when volume is more important. I knew a guy who ran 100psi in his TC happily. It took three of us to convince him it was a bad idea. So long as I see at least 40 psi at moderate highway speeds, I'm content.

Golly gosh Stevo, tell me about this nifty new volume gauge? Where can I get one? I need one. Can I pay by credit card? Forget about 20 lbs pressure on the highway, think volume. Urology references are so apropos. I have never checked ppressure, just volume/

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Mitchman2 Avatar
Mitchman2 Mitchell Andrus
Mills River, North Carolina, USA   USA
In reply to # 3599405 by condor1 Urology references are so apropos. I have never checked pressure, just volume/

You're the man.



Buy a man a plane ticket and he flies for a day,
push a man out of an airplane and he'll fly for the rest of his life.

'30 Model A Ford
'48 MGTC
'58 MGA
'58 MGA

xpag TC Wm. H
Odessa, florida, USA   USA
Terry,
Re post 15 To Tom:

Basically, mechanical failures can only occur when product is exposed to loads that exceed the original design load parameters the product was expected to be exposed to, including safety factors. So a product, albeit a main cap stud or whatever high quality product designed to be strong enough to exceed anticipated loads, is not going to break. Sure, bearings can overheat, run, & fail, but this is a lube failure. Whether it is a design failure or a maintenance failure is another question.

It would be very bad practice to reuse any fastener involved in, or part of a failed product as one would have no useful knowledge of the loads the fastener was exposed to when crank or associated part failed. I.e. Fastener may have been exposed to loads exceeding yield strength, but not exceeding UTS. THE FASTENER IS JUNK!

WSH
TC XPAG



Edited 4 time(s). Last edit at 2017-10-01 09:22 AM by xpag TC.

xpag TC Wm. H
Odessa, florida, USA   USA
Why the snarky remark when someone like Steve is trying to provide useful educational information?

WSH

Steve S Avatar
On The Road, Lost in So Cal, USA   USA
Beware the troll! winking smiley

Edit: By the way, hey Bill, really nice to see you on another forum. Your posts are always top notch. But beware the trolls!



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2017-09-27 10:16 PM by Steve S.

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malski Avatar
malski Silver Member Peter Malkin
Bright, N.E.Victoria, Australia   AUS
Troll x 2.



Peter Malkin
NE Victoria
Australia
MGBGTV8 (1977)
MGB Roadster (1967) Supercharged - under restoration
MGTC (1949)

condor1 Terrance Thames (Disabled)
Disabled Account, Antarctica   ATA
Is that how you roll on your website here huh steve? Someone calls you on a pointless pressure/volume remark and suddenly all you can think of is talking on about getting some willy.
I heard all about you guys in LA always looking for willy. Seems a bit odd to discuss your preferences and
slip it in in during a rod lube discussion, but whatever gets your motor running. Pressure/volume yeah right. What kind of lube again? Does that last longer between changes? Is there some sort of willy shortage in LA or are you looking for some special willy? I might know some guys that can help.

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Steve S Avatar
On The Road, Lost in So Cal, USA   USA
Uh... ok? Actually I wasn't the one who brought up pressure and volume. But I hope you feel better now. confused smiley

Have a good one.... cool smiley

TC4459 Damian Rowe
Mt. Ommaney, QLD, Australia   AUS
1949 MG TC
Thanks for all these posts folks.
+1 on the oil volume importance.
A high pressure going into say a blocked tube dors norhing for lubricarion. once the oil is IN the bearing, its properties define whether it will prevent metal contact, and more oil flowing through keeps a constant film in play. There is not really any 'pressure' within the rod bearing.

Also. A query if I may to those who have used Saenz or Phoenix rods. What do you do for pistons, given the bolted gudgeon (wrist) pin of the old type xpag rods and the floating setup of the nee types ? Do you get special pistons, or get standard ones grooved for circlips ?

xpag TC Wm. H
Odessa, florida, USA   USA
Damian,
For rods with full floating gudgeon, buttons fit at each end of the gudgeon bore are the typical solution to keep pin centered, and in place. The inner end of the button is an interference fit into i.d. of gudgeon, o.d. of button is nominal o.d. of gudgeon bore, length of buttons with gudgeon centered in piston bore is sufficient to allow a few thou. clearance between buttons & piston bore. Button material is usually Teflon, Tufnol, or aluminum. Outer end of button is crowned. For further details contact your rod supplier.
See http://www.kustom1warehouse.net/Wrist_pin_retainers_and_barrel_shims_for_VW_p/page21-2011.htm



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2017-10-10 04:12 PM by xpag TC.

TC4459 Damian Rowe
Mt. Ommaney, QLD, Australia   AUS
1949 MG TC
Thanks. I have read an article a while back on someone who made teflon butttons.
I guess when I get to that point, I go with whatever the rod/pin suppliers can provide.

Cambren Avatar
Cambren Cambren Davis
Hernando Beach, FL, USA   USA
Aluminum buttons are widely used in aircraft piston engines. I have never seen issues with them.



The truth is like poetry.........most people hate poetry.

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