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T-Series & Prewar Forum

Grabbing Front Brake

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parkerg1 Avatar
parkerg1 Gary Parker
Grand Island, Ne., USA   USA
1951 MG TD
1961 Triumph TR3A
1998 BMW Z3
The right front brake on my 51 TD has started grabbing. My first thought was a leaking wheel cyl, letting fluid on the shoes. This afternoon, I pulled the front wheel, and looked in the adjusting hole. I can see both cyl and they look totally clean, no sign of any leakage, and there is no sign of any thing leaking out the bottom of the drum. Before I go through the hassle of pulling the drum and hub, I thought I would check to see if anyone has any thoughts as to why it would be grabbing. After I drive it a while the grabbing is not as severe as at first, but it still pulls to the right. Any words of wisdom?
Thanks
Gary

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plus4moggie Tom Lange
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA   USA
First of all, if it is pulling to the right then the LEFT side is the problem. The first thing to do is adjust the brakes - tighten the adjusters down all the way tight, then release one click. Then drive it again, and see where you stand.

Your situation is usually a problem with a wheel cylinder being frozen, brake fluid on the lining, or a brake hose problem. Best is to pull one drum, and have someone slowly, gently, step on the brakes - you should watch for movement of the wheel cylinder piston. If one moves I put a zip-tie around it to hold the piston in place, and then see if slowly, gently stepping on the brakes will move the other wheel cylinder. Usually it does not. If all moves, check the other side.

Brake hoses eventually break down internally, and retain pressure; check the condition.

Good time to re-pack the wheel bearings, and check the seal.

Tom Lange
MGT Repair

bobs77vet Avatar
bobs77vet bob K.
northern Va, Va, USA   USA
I would also look to the other side and see whats going on there. the inbalance could come from leaking fluids on the other side.

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TD4834 Avatar
TD4834 Bill Chasser
Sacramento, CA, USA   USA
What about a bonded lining coming loose?

parkerg1 Avatar
parkerg1 Gary Parker
Grand Island, Ne., USA   USA
1951 MG TD
1961 Triumph TR3A
1998 BMW Z3
Thanks for the reply's guys. I pulled the left wheel today, and everything seems fine on that side. I readjusted the brakes, and will hopefully take if for a little ride tomorrow. It's supposed to be a blistering 50 degrees tomorrow. Today its upper thirty's, and raining, and I still have the top down. The right brake has a spot in it where it drags a little, and I suspect maybe a stuck cyl. If it still does it after a drive I will pull the right drum. I will have to come up with a puller to do it. I will let you know what I find.
Thanks Again
Gary

parkerg1 Avatar
parkerg1 Gary Parker
Grand Island, Ne., USA   USA
1951 MG TD
1961 Triumph TR3A
1998 BMW Z3
Took the TD for a fairly long drive today, trying to use the brakes as much as possible. At first it was still grabbing, but after a while on the way home, it was almost back to normal. I think I will just let it go till I can get it out and drive more. May be next spring when you live in Nebraska.
Gary

peter14222 Avatar
peter14222 Peter Gilvarry
Buffalo, NY, USA   USA
How did this go?

I have a pull to the right, everything is new, probably just and adjustment on the left is my guess.

Going to give that a try this weekend.

Peter

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tmorehouse Avatar
tmorehouse Silver Member Tom Morehouse
Eastford, Connecticut, USA   USA
Something to consider ... when adjusting the brakes - push the brake pedal to actually "reset" the shoes every time you turn that screw. Otherwise, what feels like good adjustment when the brakes are static, may change when you actually use the brakes.

Tom M.



History: 1975 MGB, 1959 TR3, 1958 Mercedes-Benz 220S, 1960 M-B 190b, 1958 Rambler American.
Current: 1953 MG TD27318.
https://nutmegflyer.wordpress.com/trip-details-daily-updates/

peter14222 Avatar
peter14222 Peter Gilvarry
Buffalo, NY, USA   USA
Thanks Tom, I will do that, I have used the method described elsewhere of locking the adjuster down tight as possible and backing off one click. Sadly I only did it on one side, need to get to the left one tomorrow, weather permitting.

Peter

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tmorehouse Avatar
tmorehouse Silver Member Tom Morehouse
Eastford, Connecticut, USA   USA
Peter - sounds good. Let us know how it works out.

Also, you wrote "locking the adjuster down tight as possible".

Actually it's "turn the adjuster screw until the brake shoe locks the wheel, then back off one click". Don't try to turn the adjuster screw as tight as possible.

And remember there are two adjusters on each front wheel.

Hang in there.
Tom M.



History: 1975 MGB, 1959 TR3, 1958 Mercedes-Benz 220S, 1960 M-B 190b, 1958 Rambler American.
Current: 1953 MG TD27318.
https://nutmegflyer.wordpress.com/trip-details-daily-updates/

peter14222 Avatar
peter14222 Peter Gilvarry
Buffalo, NY, USA   USA
I think it might have been Dave DuBois had a method of taking the adjuster up all the way, this does have the effect of driving the piston back into the cylinder, this did reveal a weeping bleeder which I resolved with a Speed Bleeder.

Yep, I know there are 2 adjusters on the front.

Thanks,

Peter

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