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'99 Land Rover 4.0 Engine

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AGlass0fMilk Avatar
AGlass0fMilk Don Beckstein
Buffalo, NY, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB GT "The GT"
1980 MG MGB Limited Edition (LE) "Elli"
I have been thinking about swapping a V8 engine into my GT for a while. I'm in no rush to convert over, but I look on craigslist every now and then.

I found an engine on craigslist nearby that's from a 1999 Land Rover. It's a 4.0L V8, a bored out version of the Buick 215.

I'm wondering if this would be a possible candidate for a conversion? How difficult would it be to convert to a carburetor (if I wanted to) and are there any fitment issues I would have to look out for? Any weight issues, required suspension or brake upgrades?

If I can get it cheap enough it may be a fun winter project to rebuild.

Thanks



1980 MGB Limited Edition (Car No. 2744)
"If anything's gonna happen it's gonna happen out there!"

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Simon Austin Avatar
It's a great engine for a swap, Don. I have/had cars with smaller versions of this engine; a '77 B roadster with the 3.5; a '94 MG RV8 with the 3.9 and and am now building a '70 BGT with another 3.5.

The very first purchase you should make is this book: https://www.amazon.ca/How-Give-Your-MGB-Power/dp/1845848330

Earlier editions helped me with my conversions. Lots of information on this site as well as http://www.britishv8.org

Fitting a carb is easy. I have an Edelbrock 500 cfm carb on my '77. Others will suggest FI. Your '73 will require some alterations to the engine bay that a later car already has.

I notice you didn't ask about costs. That's good....don't...grinning smiley



"Speed costs........how fast you want to spend?"

MGB567 Avatar
MGB567 Gold Member Barrie Braxton
Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia   AUS
1966 MG MGB MkI "Money Guzzler"
1979 MG MGB GT V8 Conversion "Darkside"
Many of us fit the R of the BOPR block from various sources; my own is from a TVR. Have you read this and in particular the 3.9/4 litre section- there's a good and bad version.



Convertible: CKD 11/66 first registered 8/5/67. Owned since 3/77. 90% original sheet metal. 18GB +40 balanced with almost all new internals. Peter Burgess big valve fast road head. Piper 285. Fidanza FW. Basil's followers and pushrods. TR7clutch. TT exhaust. ARP everywhere. 123 ign. Needham 4synchro c/r box.. Stock rebuilt/replaced suspension. Superpro bushes. New brakes all round including all pipes in SS flex. Interior redone. CAMS approved roll bar and side bars. Lots more. Hybrid of o/e and show/fast road car. Not for sale - it's my toy!

GT: UK car built/sold December '78. Stripped back to bare shell (with extensive bodywork to come). Powered by 'worked' Rover 5 litre V8 (ex TVR Chimera) with efi. T5 box. FC IFS. CCE rear attached to Salisbury axle with Quaife. And a whole lot more to yet to come. Stealth is the word.

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AGlass0fMilk Avatar
AGlass0fMilk Don Beckstein
Buffalo, NY, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB GT "The GT"
1980 MG MGB Limited Edition (LE) "Elli"
Which one is the bad version? The article you linked mentions it was updated in 1995 to be more rigid, etc. Since this one is out of a 1999 I'm guessing it would be a "good" version.

Edit: Also, I know it'd be preferable to have it painted after a conversion, but someone backed into me last year and I'm just having the shop do a full paint job over the winter. I wouldn't mind repainting the engine bay but I don't want to modify the external bodywork much.

From my reading I am seeing people often modify the steering column and firewall. Maybe cut a hole in the inner fender to route exhaust.

Are power brakes necessary? Any preference for this conversion in the GEMS vs the BOSCH engines?



1980 MGB Limited Edition (Car No. 2744)
"If anything's gonna happen it's gonna happen out there!"



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 2017-09-05 10:14 AM by AGlass0fMilk.

Simon Austin Avatar
Power brakes aren't necessary. They don't give you extra boost. They just let you apply less foot pressure to achieve the same force on your brakes.

Here's a good article on the various versions of the Rover V8: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rover_V8_engine

Don't start a project based on suddenly having an engine available. Research everything you can, decide what you want the car to be in the end then reverse-engineer it to achieve that result.

The GEMS manages both fuel and ignition on later Rover V8's. My 1994 MG RV8 had the Lucas 14CUX system installed which only managed the fuel scheduling. Ignition was via conventional electronic distributor. The 4.0 you're looking at should have the 14CUX system.

I went with a carb for simplicity. Probably not as efficient as FI but it works. There are newer FI systems available nowadays.



"Speed costs........how fast you want to spend?"

billgknapp Avatar
billgknapp Silver Member Bill Knapp
Rochester, Michigan, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB "Nigel"
Some miscellaneous thoughts for you. The BOPR engines are actually lighter than the original 4 cylinder iron engines, due to the BOPR engines having aluminum block and heads. So weight is not an issue. The Buick 300 does have an iron block, but doesn't add that much weight and has advantages. The Rover 4.0 and 4.6 have better heads/valves than the others, so some use 4.0/4.6 heads on the other engines, as I did. You will read about the slipped cylinder liner issue in certain Rover engines.

Do plan for the conversion to be more complicated and expensive than you think. Decide what you want the engine and car to do as part of your planning. You read some of the people on the British V8 site and other places, start with a BOPR and end up switching to a Ford 302 or another due to wanting even more power. I can understand that after living with my 3.5L for a while. I might have tried the 4.6L if I had it to do over again, and/or looked at a stroker version. I really do like having the BOPR engine due to its role in MGB history, but I would admit that it is somewhat illogical why that holds the importance it does for me.

ohlord Avatar
ohlord Gold Member Rob C
North of Seattle, N.W., USA   USA
1957 Land Rover Series I "EYEYIYI"
1971 MG MGB
1971 MG MGB "Bedouin 2"
http://aluminumv8.com is your friend for various items and such.
You've access to much more info than we who did our first buick Olds 215 swaps in the 1970's
Protect the fresh paint with plenty of moving blankets
Have fun



"I'm a long way gone down this wild road I'm on
It's gonna take me where I'm bound
It's a long way around"



"These are the days that must happen to you"

RD2 Radar/ Electronic Warfare Technician
Vietnam 1969-1972



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-09-05 11:49 PM by ohlord.

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MGB567 Avatar
MGB567 Gold Member Barrie Braxton
Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia   AUS
1966 MG MGB MkI "Money Guzzler"
1979 MG MGB GT V8 Conversion "Darkside"
By good/bad I was referring to Wiki's "The engine was revised in 1995 (and thereafter referred to as a 4.0 to differentiate it from the earlier version, although displacement remained the same at 3,946 cc) with a new intake and exhaust system, extra block ribbing, revised pistons, and larger cross-bolted main-bearings."

As an aside I have a Landrover wrecker not far from me and I asked them about using Landrover V8 in general. They said that they do not rebuild blocks due to the cost of machining rather they replace with a block from Turner's in the UK. I checked with my local machinist on what might be the cost of refurbishing a V8 (I wasn't sure what displacement) and the ball park quote assuming worst case scenario was not a whole lot less than the quoted price for my fully refurbished (with fruit) 5litre so I bought that.

So that's to add to Simon's advice "Don't start a project based on suddenly having an engine available. Research everything you can, decide what you want the car to be in the end then reverse-engineer it to achieve that result. " I'd add that there's a myriad of V8s out there not just the BOPR so it's not necessarily a case of a bird in the hand....

Have a careful look at your '73 engine bay and that of your '80; the latter was designed for the V8 whereas the '73 needs work. IDK the % who take the exhaust through the inner wing v those who don't; I think we reach the conclusion after studying various builds and deciding for ourselves. I chose to go through the wing as I came to the conclusion that due to the restricted space this was better.

Brakes depends on what you plan. At the very least you replicate the Factory V8 realising that what they did was for a 135bhp car. Again you need to research what's recommended for your application. I don't have power brakes but I do have 4pot fronts and at present I'm sticking with a stock rear but the bias is controlled by a balance bar on a twin M/C arrangement based on the single line pedal box.



Convertible: CKD 11/66 first registered 8/5/67. Owned since 3/77. 90% original sheet metal. 18GB +40 balanced with almost all new internals. Peter Burgess big valve fast road head. Piper 285. Fidanza FW. Basil's followers and pushrods. TR7clutch. TT exhaust. ARP everywhere. 123 ign. Needham 4synchro c/r box.. Stock rebuilt/replaced suspension. Superpro bushes. New brakes all round including all pipes in SS flex. Interior redone. CAMS approved roll bar and side bars. Lots more. Hybrid of o/e and show/fast road car. Not for sale - it's my toy!

GT: UK car built/sold December '78. Stripped back to bare shell (with extensive bodywork to come). Powered by 'worked' Rover 5 litre V8 (ex TVR Chimera) with efi. T5 box. FC IFS. CCE rear attached to Salisbury axle with Quaife. And a whole lot more to yet to come. Stealth is the word.

Simon Austin Avatar
Don,

If you're curious, I have a '70 BGT in the garage getting a 3.5 conversion. The required firewall mods were done by the PO and will show you what you'll need to do to complete the conversion.

I can post some photos if you like.



"Speed costs........how fast you want to spend?"

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AGlass0fMilk Avatar
AGlass0fMilk Don Beckstein
Buffalo, NY, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB GT "The GT"
1980 MG MGB Limited Edition (LE) "Elli"
In reply to # 3586949 by Simon Austin Don,

If you're curious, I have a '70 BGT in the garage getting a 3.5 conversion. The required firewall mods were done by the PO and will show you what you'll need to do to complete the conversion.

I can post some photos if you like.

That sounds great, please post them if you could.

I like the idea of keeping my car looking as close to stock as possible. So if I were to do a V8 conversion the logical choice would be the same engine used by the factory back in the day. I'm not afraid of fabrication or custom electrics.

I'm sure the power of a 4.0L V8 compared to the stock 1.8 I4 would be pretty noticeable. The only performance upgrades my engine has is a recent rebuild and a Weber DGEV conversion.



1980 MGB Limited Edition (Car No. 2744)
"If anything's gonna happen it's gonna happen out there!"

Simon Austin Avatar
I'll post some later, Don.

I wouldn't put much faith in logic. You build the car YOU want. I like the Rover engines. As Bill mentioned in #6, I like the idea of a British engine in a British car as well.

The 4.0 you mentioned; is it possible to hear it run? Is it still in a LR? That will tell you a lot about its condition.



"Speed costs........how fast you want to spend?"

AGlass0fMilk Avatar
AGlass0fMilk Don Beckstein
Buffalo, NY, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB GT "The GT"
1980 MG MGB Limited Edition (LE) "Elli"
In reply to # 3587228 by Simon Austin I'll post some later, Don.

I wouldn't put much faith in logic. You build the car YOU want. I like the Rover engines. As Bill mentioned in #6, I like the idea of a British engine in a British car as well.

The 4.0 you mentioned; is it possible to hear it run? Is it still in a LR? That will tell you a lot about its condition.

I've had some contact with the seller. So far I know it's not in a LR anymore, he just has the whole drivetrain (engine/auto trans/transfer case) out of the car. He said it "ran good" and the car was damaged with "low miles but not sure of exact".

I asked him for some pictures. Since I can't hear it run and don't have exact miles I think that will drive the price down a bit. Any tips on checking out an engine that's out of the car? I know it'll be hard to determine if there's any cracks, etc so I think it will have a large bearing on final price. Do you guys have any suggestions for the going rate of a used 99' LR 4.0 V8 considering the circumstances?



1980 MGB Limited Edition (Car No. 2744)
"If anything's gonna happen it's gonna happen out there!"

billgknapp Avatar
billgknapp Silver Member Bill Knapp
Rochester, Michigan, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB "Nigel"
Noisy, cracked warped, leaking -- all of the things you can't tell if you can't run it. If the buyer is really cooperative, you could make a little test bench and hook up battery and cooling to it, as some people have. That way you could test it. If you can determine it has no problems that way, you might be comfortable paying more. Engines seem to go for $500 - $700. You should plan on rebuilding the engine way, from a performance and reliability standpoint. And you will need several specific parts such as bellhousing, starter, water pump, etc. so you won't want to place too much of a premium on the fact that it runs, other than piece of mind for the condition of the block, heads, crank, etc. Completely rebuilt ones turn up from time to time for $2,000 or so. Although there isn't the same piece of mind or pride in doing the build yourself. I wouldn't pay much over that $500-700 range myself. My 2 cents.

In addition to talking to Mark at D&D (aluminumV8.com) you should also talk with Glenn Towery at 302-734-1243. They both are a wealth of knowledge, help and parts/services for the BOPR crowd.

Simon Austin Avatar
Photos of the firewall mods to my '70 BGT. As mentioned in an earlier post, the PO completed these mods from the book "How to give your MGB V8 Power". I have neither the patience nor skills to pull this off...grinning smiley

You'll see on the driver's foot well photos that's it's now an aftermarket pedal. With the firewall mods, the original mounting bracket for the stock pedal was lost. After posting on here looking for a solution, I installed a "Lokar" pedal which should do the job nicely.



"Speed costs........how fast you want to spend?"


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V8MGBV8 Avatar
V8MGBV8 Carl Floyd
Kinggsport, TN, USA   USA
In reply to # 3586806 by MGB567 By good/bad I was referring to Wiki's "The engine was revised in 1995 (and thereafter referred to as a 4.0 to differentiate it from the earlier version, although displacement remained the same at 3,946 cc) with a new intake and exhaust system, extra block ribbing, revised pistons, and larger cross-bolted main-bearings."


The bad ones are the ones with a slipped cylinder liner and/or a crack in the block behind the liner. winking smiley

The latest Rover V8s with larger crankshaft mains & cross-bolted main bearing caps are overkill for everyone excepting competition use. The older engines are just fine for 99% of use.

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