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Slight loss of coolant? Here´s why...

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woolfman Avatar
woolfman Wolf B
Vienna, Vienna, Austria   AUT
1964 MG Midget "The Tart"
I was experiencing a constant little loss of cooling liquid over time. Since I could rule out the engine and the recently rebuild faucet (original version), I knew it must have developed somewhere else.
After a year of driving, I now found the spot: It was the base where the faucet screws in.

As it appears, the flat surface where it meets the cylinder head wasn´t flat enough. Coolant evaporated from there, leaving a very faint trace. Since I sanded it down and applied some form-a-gasket the leak is gone now.

In case someone is having the same problem...



Cheers,
Wolf
http://www.drivetribe.com/t/d73p9OJcQs6U2DVBtPE6Jg/SYS-PGjQR8CKg_5iHuZEnQ

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66jalopy Avatar
66jalopy Silver Member Phillip Jolliffe
Lake City, FL, USA   USA
My faucet is not installed, no heater, but it's base is definitely warped.

Kerr Avatar
Kerr Platinum Member Norm Kerr
Ann Arbor, MI, USA   USA
Awesome, Wolf, I am glad that you were able to catch it and it was such an easy fix!

that little aluminum base under the heater spigot always irritated me, because it would corrode severely over time in spite of using generous doses of anit-sieze, and trying various gasket materials

I finally gave up on aluminum and made one out of brass (and installed it with stainless studs & nuts). That one should last me forever.

Good point on having a flat surface. Whenever removing parts that go together with a gasket, especially if they are made of soft materials like aluminum, an old mechanic taught me that it is a really good idea to block sand the mating surfaces. A handy way to do that is with a sheet of plate glass, some emory paper and some oil.


smiling smiley


Norm

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AN5L8016 Avatar
AN5L8016 Mark Haynes
Nederland, Colorado, USA   USA
In reply to a post by kerr A handy way to do that is with a sheet of plate glass, some emory paper and some oil.
And don't forget to use a Figure 8 pattern to eliminate any angular offsets as well.



'58 Bugeye
'05 Mini Cooper S

trevorwj Avatar
trevorwj Trevor Jessie
Louisville, KY, USA   USA
Hmmm... I have a chunk of brass in the scrap bin. It may be large enough to put to use.



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1974MGMidget Avatar
1974MGMidget Silver Member Jack Orkin
Grayson, Georgia, USA   USA
Hmmm, Trevor, a new cottage industry?!

woolfman Avatar
woolfman Wolf B
Vienna, Vienna, Austria   AUT
1964 MG Midget "The Tart"
Norm,

I don´t know why I didn´t check it when I rebuild the cylinder head last year. I did a complete rebuild of the heater valve but it never came to my mind that the base isn´t flush with the head...

Anyway it´s a good feeling not having to top up every 100 mls. Makes driving so much more fun :-)

Next thing I am going to try is a straight 30 grade oil. Currently I am using a straight 40, which is a bit too thick IMO...still having a bit too much pressure after a highway run...



Cheers,
Wolf
http://www.drivetribe.com/t/d73p9OJcQs6U2DVBtPE6Jg/SYS-PGjQR8CKg_5iHuZEnQ

Kerr Avatar
Kerr Platinum Member Norm Kerr
Ann Arbor, MI, USA   USA
"Next thing I am going to try is a straight 30 grade oil."

Can you get 20W50 oil? It is better than straight 30 because it can change viscosity with temperature through that range (20~50), and it typically comes with detergents which help to carry debris to the filter (straight weight oils were usually used in engines which lacked a filter, so that feature wasn't needed, and some use a splash type lubrication which would get foamy if the detergents were included). Our engine has a modern oil pump and filter, so 20W50 is probably best.

If you can find it with 800~1200PPM (parts / million) of ZDDP (zinc), that is helpful to your flat tappets. Motorcycle oil and Diesel engine oil in 20W50 typically will have that. Most motor oil today has far less, to protect the life of the catalytic converter for 100k miles (160k km), not something we need care about.




N

66jalopy Avatar
66jalopy Silver Member Phillip Jolliffe
Lake City, FL, USA   USA
Vavoline VR1 is available in 30w and 40w. Same additives as their multi viscosity oils.

woolfman Avatar
woolfman Wolf B
Vienna, Vienna, Austria   AUT
1964 MG Midget "The Tart"
Why should a good straight 30 not come with detergents? How come you know which brand of oil I use?
I never said where I buy it....

The reason why I switch to 30 are:

-less resistance when cold, means more flow, means less stress on starter motor. Hence easier starting.
-quicker in lubricating when engine wears most due to less resistance -> at startup and when cold
-higher alkaline reserve
-higher zddp %
-less hp loss due to less resistance in flow
-less heat produced due to less resistance, oil flows quicker through engine, engine runs a little cooler
-less choke needed when cold

Since I don´t drive in winter, I have no use for 20w. And since originally straight 30 was recommended I´ll give it a try.
I have almost instant engine start with straight 40 right now when cold (3-5 seconds of turning with 20w50 before engine fired up), but a little bit too much pressure for my taste.
In my opinion having 75+ psi @ 2000rpm is too much. And having the PRV dump so much extra pressure for nothing is a waste of energy, as the oil goes directly to the sump back again right after the oil pump.

That is one of the reasons why I think a 30 weight might be in the ballpark at temperatures around 20°-30°C without having too much pressure at takeoff. Plus it is less stress on all seals, like side covers and original oil filter, which leaked 2 times in the past on my engine.

Engine oils are so much better since back then. I believe there is no reason to stick with a multigrade which in my opinion is "sitting between all chairs" because it has to deal with all situations.
I have used VR1 in the past, it is ok and I would get back to using it again if 30 weight turns out too thick. We´ll see cool smiley

Thats my 2cts.



Cheers,
Wolf
http://www.drivetribe.com/t/d73p9OJcQs6U2DVBtPE6Jg/SYS-PGjQR8CKg_5iHuZEnQ



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-07-18 04:01 AM by woolfman.

66jalopy Avatar
66jalopy Silver Member Phillip Jolliffe
Lake City, FL, USA   USA
I am with you on the 30w. I live in Florida where it rarely gets down to 0º C so I don't see why I need multigrade either. I was using a synthetic 10/40w and switched to 20/50w VR1 last change. Now my oil pressure runs 80 lb at idle cold and at 2000 rpm hot, too much for my liking, I am also going to try the 30W. Like you I also blew the filter seal first time I started car withe the 20w/50, had to tighten filter with a wrench, not good.

woolfman Avatar
woolfman Wolf B
Vienna, Vienna, Austria   AUT
1964 MG Midget "The Tart"
Yes, due to climate change in recent years we don´t get the winters here we used have, like -10°C and loads of snow. That is a thing of the past now. If we´re we lucky, we have a few cm snow in January for about 2 weeks, after which is gone because of way too early spring temperatures....



Cheers,
Wolf
http://www.drivetribe.com/t/d73p9OJcQs6U2DVBtPE6Jg/SYS-PGjQR8CKg_5iHuZEnQ

Jan Kruber Avatar
Ballerup, Copenhagen, Denmark   DNK
In reply to # 3553806 by Kerr "Next thing I am going to try is a straight 30 grade oil."

Can you get 20W50 oil? It is better than straight 30 because it can change viscosity with temperature through that range (20~50), and it typically comes with detergents which help to carry debris to the filter (straight weight oils were usually used in engines which lacked a filter, so that feature wasn't needed, and some use a splash type lubrication which would get foamy if the detergents were included). Our engine has a modern oil pump and filter, so 20W50 is probably best.

If you can find it with 800~1200PPM (parts / million) of ZDDP (zinc), that is helpful to your flat tappets. Motorcycle oil and Diesel engine oil in 20W50 typically will have that. Most motor oil today has far less, to protect the life of the catalytic converter for 100k miles (160k km), not something we need care about.




N

Norm, how much zink is in this i PPM of ZDDP?
http://www.penriteoil.com.au/assets/pis_pdfs/CLASSIC%2020W-50%20-%20MAY%202017.pdf



Mightymidget

woolfman Avatar
woolfman Wolf B
Vienna, Vienna, Austria   AUT
1964 MG Midget "The Tart"
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