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DIY EFI for 1275 Spridgets

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CtMGDude John R
New Fairfield, Ct, USA   USA
Those step drills are a Godsend for inaccurate holes, such as those needed for grommets. Your speedo cable unit/mount looks really clean. winking smiley

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Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
In reply to # 3569173 by CtMGDude Those step drills are a Godsend for inaccurate holes, such as those needed for grommets. Your speedo cable unit/mount looks really clean. winking smiley

Thanks John. Hope it ends up running as good as the conversion writ large is starting to look!

Joel


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CtMGDude John R
New Fairfield, Ct, USA   USA
You have one supporter here. I have often thought of converting my '83 GS750ES to fuel injection by grabbing one off of another motorcycle. i just don't know enough about programming these things, if they can be flashed, and power curves met, or if they are just like the simple Unit of my '73 450SL, which just shortens and lengthens the duration if the spray injection (great for emissions testing, it's a little box under the passenger foot well, with a dial that clicks. Counter clockwise lean, clockwise rich)!), and the injector timing is done off of distributor points, however, this is lacking in a motorcycle,in this case, a Hall Effect set up might work, or maybe tapping into the crankshaft timing pick up, and installing another one 180 out of time (tearing the pick up of the one board, and mounting it to the one presently n the motorcycle, and use that. I don't want to reinvent the wheel. The complete unit of of a crashed bike would be better to play with. You have peaked my curiosity!! I wish their were "Likes" on this forum, I would click "Like" on this thread. smiling smiley

Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
So, got the 'no fray' cable shearing cutters from Amazon (post #94), and they cut throttle, choke, speedo, and bicycle cables like butter--and incredibly cleanly. Wish I'd had a pair of these all of the times I buggered up that teensy MG choke cable over the years! Well worth the money for all you MG mechanics.

The swaging die is supposed to get here Monday from Alaska, so I experimented with ways to reliably put sufficient pressure on it. Then, while doing related research, ran across this poor DIYer who appeared to be an experienced machinist and made his own cable core-squaring die. Well, when his young (160 lb.) assistant bore down too hard on their mill's vise... check out the photo. That cooled me on using my bench vise.

So - I gazed around the shop and (duh!) my eyes came to rest on my new hydraulic shop press. Should be as easy as clamping some guide stock slightly thinner than the assembled die halfs to keep them from drifting around, inserting the cable housing and ferrule, and s-m-o-o-s-h. In the event that the middle-sized hole is for .297 housing (as could be the case) rather than .330, I'll just walk the die to the neighbor's machine shop and have him enlarge that hole to fit and redo the chamfers. Voila!

Hoping to get much of the loom finished tomorrow or next Saturday, which will just leave the VSS and... that's it?! Gotta be something I'm forgetting...

Joel



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-08-12 11:21 PM by Yankeedriver.


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CtMGDude John R
New Fairfield, Ct, USA   USA
That's got to be some cheap Indian or Chinese vise. The Hilma vise I use, you don't even tighten in that sense, you put the part of the parallels, or supports, whatever, and just turn the handle still it stops, almost one full turn, there is no force involved, and the vise automatically pulls the part down, and holds it tightly to be cut. I have held things pieces of .125" Titanium, and fly cut .002" off using a fly cutter, getting a perfectly square and flat surface.

I've never seen a hydraulic vice that works on continually getting tighter. I would never use such a device. The one I speak of have adjustments for pressure range.

On the cable ends. I have designed a few bicycles and trikes, both recumbent, and I made the cable ends out of aluminum. I just give them a slight squeeze with Cable cutters, then heat and fill them with flue cored solder, which seals them up nicely. winking smiley

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Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
John,

Good to know. As I understand swaging, my purpose is a little different; simultaneously holding and reforming the metal through exertion of force, rather than holding it motionless so something else--a bit--can do work on the stock.

I believe that the swaging die is more akin to that inside one of the single-purpose, massive presses in the aerospace (and bus part, and lots of other miscellaneous stuff I didn't investigate) shop I worked in briefly many years ago, and each of which did one thing (loudly). There were multi-function machines that would perform three or more bends or other tweaks in rapid succession (fun to watch), but the big vertical presses I hope to approximate by using my arbor press used two-part dies that, at least to my inexperienced eyes, resembled the swaging die I'm waiting eagerly to go pick up from NAPA.

The dies in that application basically directed reformation of the stock--or in our case, a much more measured tweak of an existing part.

Many if not most of those presses worked through hydraulic actuation, though I could be wrong in that some may have been electronically driven. Anyway, the inexpensive hydraulic arbor press (pictured) can be used quite delicately if you have or make up a decent jig and/or die. I got this one specifically for the very small needle bearing units that go into the aft end of the Eaton M45 I'm using in the DIY Suypercharger project, here at post #67: http://www.mgexp.com/phorum/read.php?3,3418377,page=5

Somewhere, I've got a Youtube video of a guy using an arbor press like mine to insert those little bearing races, so I don't see why it shouldn't be able to safely exert pressure on the swaging dies--again, so long as I keep the die halves square and plumb. However, I'm happy to hear suggestions for a better way to do this, as I didn't order extra ferrules!

P.S. Although more intended for the DIY supercharger string, I should mention that I'm going to have the next door neighbor's production-scale CNC shop make up a jig and die set for R&Ring the M45's rear needle bearings, so I can do that otherwise PITA task for folks inexpensively and accurately. Probably won't be many people installing their own superchargers, but if I can help even a handful of people shock the goose poop out of some MGB or TR6 owners, it'll be worth it! moon

Joel



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-08-13 07:48 AM by Yankeedriver.


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Gillamax Avatar
Gillamax Silver Member Gary Wright
Ennis, Texas, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB "My Girl"
If you use a gualuty vise like KURTZ, that will never happen.



American by birth. Texan by the grace of GOD.
USMC Semper Fi

refisk Avatar
refisk Rick Fisk
Frankenmuth, Michigan, USA   USA
1972 MG Midget MkIII "For Sale $4000"
Any vise can be broken if you apply enough force, gualuty or not. smileys with beer

In reply to # 3572161 by Gillamax If you use a gualuty vise like KURTZ, that will never happen.

Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
Well, I got the intake/exhaust side of the engine wired today. See photos. You can't see the injector branch terminus, but it uses the stock plug harvested from the donor (female side; male comes on the new injector), which caused a big delay because I had not ever sorted whether the low impedance injector was polarized. 1990 Loyale wiring diagrams for the EFI don't help, either; they just list the lead colors and terminal on the ECU.

Anyway, I decided Red/Wht is likely hot and Red/Blk the ECU trigger, which is just a ground switched on and off by the ECU. The GM ECU uses a very similar low impedance injector, but you just run fused power from an ignition-activated relay to one side, while the other gets triggered by the ECU ground trigger.

I also have to remember to triple-check the instructions I'm writing for the web page on the TPS. The TPS wiring schematic in Post #59 I got from a reputable source is right--for the particular model TPS I'm using in this conversion. However, the tricky part is, the GM pinout diagram I have which matches the 2.0L single-point EFI Cavalier/Skyhawk's VIN series must use a TPS with a different configuration plug. So, the 'A,' 'B,' 'C' designations embossed in the plug--and which match the diagram--do not match the pinout digram. However, what matters is that the right side of the TPS gets the 5v reference, and it should work. If the wires are reversed, it'll think it's WOT when idling, and vice-versa!

Finally, I got a rude awakening when methodically soldering and shrink-wrapping the leads and tucking them into the flex-braid cover--and then a chuckle. I was nearly done, and got a sinking feeling as I noticed I was two leads short! Nothing left for the air charge sensor, and a quick check on the ignition side's branch confirmed that I hadn't included leads for the air charge sensor when making the loom. Ruh-row...

So, before ripping everything out, I looked again at the pinout diagram, and to my amazement, no air charge sensor. I then looked in the Haynes manual at the engine management wiring diagram for the '85 Cavalier/Skyhawk... nada. So, how did I get the notion I needed an air charge sensor? Autozone. They list the sensor in the engine management parts for the car, the earliest stages of my research involved trying to find cars without an EGR, air injection system, etc.

Ah, well. Just need to either spring for a new aluminum snorkel connector tube or just put an NPT plug in the hole. On the plus side, the conversion just got cheaper by one sensor.

Joel


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Gillamax Avatar
Gillamax Silver Member Gary Wright
Ennis, Texas, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB "My Girl"
Joel

looking good

Gary



American by birth. Texan by the grace of GOD.
USMC Semper Fi

CtMGDude John R
New Fairfield, Ct, USA   USA
Swaging is not necessary on a cable end, the method I propose was through holes that might have the cable need to be removed. I used to run a swaging machine to making the various struts for Helicopter doors, this was a Roller swager. if you have a Lathe, you can make one by mounting the part between the check and a live center. Make a bracket and the wheel shape you want the swage to look like, (it would be round, with an axle hole) or use a bearing. You would then feed the cable to the pieces, I would again suggest cleaning, then soldering to hold it while you do this process, align up your tool, and just start go go in. It's kin of like a knurling, but you are narrowing the pieces with out taking any metal off. This would be a quick set up if you have access to a lathe, and once you have made the necessary pieces, you would have a kit for doing all cables that sizes, or any size, as the tool would work well on aluminum, it would only work on thin steel housings. Kind of over kill, but you seem to b making quite a car, showable even. winking smiley

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Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
Gary - thanks very much. Glacial progress is still progress!

John - I appreciate your kind encouragement, but this car likely won't ever be show worthy; I'm too lazy (and frankly too busy with work) to clean it up that much under the bonnet.

As for the process you describe re: the speedo cable, it sounds fascinating (I love learning about machines and processes). But my goal in this and other projects is to design a process that can cheaply be replicated by people with few special tools, and who have my own, 'just above layperson' skills. That's why I spend a hugely disproportionate amount of time finding components and parts that most people can find, afford, and if necessary modify with a minimum of fuss. And I do not have a lathe (or welder, though that may change 'soon'--a relative term in my world).

As far as fabrication goes, this conversion mainly requires drilling and tapping holes in aluminum bar stock (TB to manifold, IAC valve cover plate, and TPS adapter, swirl tank and ECU brackets, etc.), bending a new feed line, and the speedo cable splice for the VSS. Making the loom is a kind of fabrication I guess; but certainly it's the biggest single time sink!

As I've hinted, I have concluded that the speedo cable operation would require more investment in tools than I'd like people to have to undergo, so provided I am successful in doing it with a minimum of fuss, I'll offer to do it for the handful of people who go EFI and want a cable-mounted VSS, probably using a (gourmet) cheeseburger as the fee if they send me their cable and drop-ship the ferrules and tips. Actually, new cables turn out to be really cheap, so they may opt to drop-ship one of those, too.

Thank you for the thoughtful suggestion, though!

Joel


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CtMGDude John R
New Fairfield, Ct, USA   USA
Geez, I think your engine bay car looks great. Not stock, but modified, and done tastefully. winking smiley

Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
In reply to # 3574027 by CtMGDude Geez, I think your engine bay car looks great. Not stock, but modified, and done tastefully. winking smiley

John - thanks. I'm a bit daunted by the spotless engine bays I see on this site, but guess it's all relevant. My wife told me after a quick glance the other day that I needed to remove the label from the hose clamp visible in post #114. I'll be doing that when I remove the air cleaner tube to insert the brass NPT plug where the air charge sensor was, and at the same time may reinstall the tube with the silver IAC valve feed nipple downward for a less cluttered look. Every little bit helps!

Everyone - after nearly 10 days, NAPA says it's running a tracking search on the swaging die they required me to pay shipping on from their Alaska warehouse but refused to drop-ship to my house. If it doesn't come in, I'm hoping to find time to complete the right-hand side branch of the loom this weekend. We'll see...

Joel


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Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
So, the swaging die came in, and if I'm understanding how these work, the three holes provided for staking ferrules onto cable housing are larger and smaller than what I need (figures that our .330" MG cable housings are considered a non-standard size). NAPA didn't have the data when ordering, so I knew it was a crap shoot.

The fix is fairly easy, though, since all I have to do is drill out the middle-sized hole (on one end) a teensy bit, coming in from each side to avoid damaging the staking octagon portion in the center (see photo), then shave the octagon down to provide just the right squeeze. Pretty straight-forward, and of course I only have to do it once and can swage/stake cables for folks forever.

The cable tip-staking portion (larger of the two small square slots) is just fine as is--basically, a durable version of the single-application staking kit Dorman sells (also attached). The smaller square hole is for smooshing cable core itself into a .104" drive end, which if you want to make durable, you just infuse it with brazing rod (or solder, I guess) and smooth with a fine file.

The shoulder on top of the die is typically smacked with a hammer, but as I've said I'll either use the bench vise or hydraulic press to actuate the die.

And the saga continues...

Joel


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