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Aluminum brake calipers

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Bill Young Avatar
Kansas City, MO, USA   USA
1952 MG TD
1959 MG MGA 1500
1973 Lotus Europa
1973 MG Midget "Half Asp Or Frank"    & more
Joe, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unsprung_weight



Bill Young
'73 Midget
'59 MGA

There is a fine line between a 'hobby' and 'mental illness'.

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nimblemotorsports Avatar
nimblemotorsports Jack Murray
Sacramento, California, USA   USA
1971 MG 1100 "MGeo"
Braking ability is significantly effected by the weight of the car, so a lightened racecar would need less,
but of course, removing heat is most critical to keep the brakes working, because if you think about it,
what the brakes do is take all the energy/momentum in the car, and convert it to heat via friction.
I'd think the aluminum caliper would improve that ability over the cast-iron.
This car should weigh a lot less than a stock midget, I'm hoping to remove 300-400lbs.
So I think the disc size reduction should not be an issue, given you guys think the stock brakes are good,
and heck it reduces weight too, in fact rotating weight. smiling smiley

mjamgb Avatar
mjamgb michael anderson
Carson City, NORTHERN NEVADA, USA   USA
I really think 1/4" off the diameter is nothing. If you look at a stock brake disc in service it probably has 1/4" of rusty unused space out there anyway.

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Speedracer Avatar
Speedracer Platinum Member Hap Waldrop
Greenville, SC, USA   USA
1967 MG MGB Racecar "The Biscuit"
Jack, if getting weight down is important to you, call me , a new set of VTO wheels ought to do the trick, they weight less than 10 pounds each grinning smiley

As for removing heat from the brakes on the race cars, we used some serious brake ducting, I made custom brake cans for my race car that bolt onto the spindle and went over the rotor and was hooked to a 2" duct that feed off the front of the car. I don't think this is hugh issue for the street unless you are doing some real serious mountain/curvey road driving, in fact for cooler climates on street car you would covers for the brake duct for most of the time, as in cooler weather the rotor would not build enough heat if heavily ducted.

I read your earlier post as for getting the weight down on your car, I beleive things like lighter wheels and fiberglass body panels will net you the most gains. You got to rember we add weight back in the race car with a roll cage, but we take alot of other stuff off the car, you would probably not in street car. I've built some pretty light race cars, I think my lightest one was a tick under 1300 pounds without a driver. One example of weight saving with a race car is the doors, in SCCA racing we have to retian steel doors, but we can gut them, a stock MG Midget roll up window door with glass probably weight 50-60 pounds, when I got thru with my race car doors, they probably weighted less than 10 pounds.



Hap Waldrop
Acme Speed Shop
864-370-3000
Website: www.acmespeedshop.com
hapwaldrop@acmespeedshop.com


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oldag98 Avatar
oldag98 Jeff and Brittany Brackenridge
Choctaw, Choctaw, Oklahoma, USA   USA
1969 MG Midget MkIII
1975 MG Midget Conversion
1976 MG Midget 1500 "Yellow One"
1977 MG Midget 1500 "Dunkirk"    & more
I just picked up a fiberglass hood from a guy parting out his unfinished streetrod Midget project. The weight savings of the fiberglass hood appears to be at least 1/2 of the stock steel hood. I really need to weigh both to see the exact #'s, but the "in the hand," weight difference is amazing. The Midget hood is thin sheet metal, is easy to lift when opening, and you'd not think any great weight savings would be found from swapping to fiberglass, but the actual weight difference between the two is really amazing.

nimblemotorsports Avatar
nimblemotorsports Jack Murray
Sacramento, California, USA   USA
1971 MG 1100 "MGeo"
I've gone through the wheels and tire weights, and found aluminum wheels to not be a good cost/weight choice.
The steel wheels are 14ish-lbs, so for $500+ I'm only saving 16-20lbs.
I saved 16-lbs with the calipers for $200 (and see my other thread in motorsports forum, I removed the brakes
in the rear for another big weight savings at the wheels. Fiberglass hood and doors are major savings)
I also think the steel wheels could be lightened up to shave off 1-2 lbs with a little careful grinding (free)
to make the difference even less. Now of course, aluminum wheels LOOK great, but I'm putting on moon discs
on the wheels so their looks are not relevant.

Update: Diamond Racing Wheels makes a lightweight 13x5.5 steel wheel that is only 10.5lbs !
And is available with the 4x4in bolt pattern, and 1" backspace, which looks to fit the Midget?
and only cost $75 ea.
Diamond Racing Wheels, lightweight 13" steel wheels


In reply to a post by Speedracer Jack, if getting weight down is important to you, call me , a new set of VTO wheels ought to do the trick, they weight less than 10 pounds each grinning smiley

As for removing heat from the brakes on the race cars, we used some serious brake ducting, I made custom brake cans for my race car that bolt onto the spindle and went over the rotor and was hooked to a 2" duct that feed off the front of the car. I don't think this is hugh issue for the street unless you are doing some real serious mountain/curvey road driving, in fact for cooler climates on street car you would covers for the brake duct for most of the time, as in cooler weather the rotor would not build enough heat if heavily ducted.

I read your earlier post as for getting the weight down on your car, I beleive things like lighter wheels and fiberglass body panels will net you the most gains. You got to rember we add weight back in the race car with a roll cage, but we take alot of other stuff off the car, you would probably not in street car. I've built some pretty light race cars, I think my lightest one was a tick under 1300 pounds without a driver. One example of weight saving with a race car is the doors, in SCCA racing we have to retian steel doors, but we can gut them, a stock MG Midget roll up window door with glass probably weight 50-60 pounds, when I got thru with my race car doors, they probably weighted less than 10 pounds.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2010-12-07 01:29 PM by nimblemotorsports.

JJFarkas Avatar
JJFarkas Jason Farkas
New Boston, MI, USA   USA
1974 MG Midget "Ruby"
So, in looking at this 10" brake kit, would one still have to modify anything? Looks completely different with those disks. Also, it would seem ordering the front damper kit from Moss-Europe vs Moss-USA is like a $300 savings.

200mph Avatar
200mph Platinum Member Mike Joy
Winston-Salem, NC, USA   USA
The Diamond wheels may work, but check the backspacing... they may not fit under your rear fenders.

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halloween Gregg B
Sheridan, WY, USA   USA
Where did you get calipers for $200 that save you 16 pounds?
GB

Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, NM, USA   USA
In reply to # 3671197 by halloween Where did you get calipers for $200 that save you 16 pounds?
GB

I'd like to know the answer to Greg's question, too. That seems too good to be true--but I'd sure like to have a pair.

Joel


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75RD350 Kent Q
Sacramento, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 3674367 by Yankeedriver
In reply to # 3671197 by halloween Where did you get calipers for $200 that save you 16 pounds?
GB

I'd like to know the answer to Greg's question, too. That seems too good to be true--but I'd sure like to have a pair.

Joel

I kinda recall reading this and think that he had gone with a set of Wilwood calipers. Dynalites maybe? Those would be about $200 for the set but what stuck in my mind is that he had to cut down the diameter of the rotors to make them work...I think(?).

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Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, NM, USA   USA
In reply to # 3674695 by 75RD350
In reply to # 3674367 by Yankeedriver
In reply to # 3671197 by halloween Where did you get calipers for $200 that save you 16 pounds?
GB

I'd like to know the answer to Greg's question, too. That seems too good to be true--but I'd sure like to have a pair.

Joel

I kinda recall reading this and think that he had gone with a set of Wilwood calipers. Dynalites maybe? Those would be about $200 for the set but what stuck in my mind is that he had to cut down the diameter of the rotors to make them work...I think(?).

Okay, thank you for following up.

Reason I ask is that after the DIY supercharger parts runs are done in a week or two, I have had lots of requests to design some brackets for a DIY front 'big brake' kt, and was going to default to the Sentra calipers, as Charlie D has confirmed they fit 13" wheels. But I wanted to at least consider Wilwood calipers if there's a not-too-outrageous option. I've found a few that may work, so we'll see what's what when that project comes up in the cue.

Joel


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Speedracer Avatar
Speedracer Platinum Member Hap Waldrop
Greenville, SC, USA   USA
1967 MG MGB Racecar "The Biscuit"
FWIW a dynalite would be going with a smaller front caliper, not the way to go, this is what we used for rear brakes on the SCCA race cars. it was a silly idea 7 years ago and it still is.



Hap Waldrop
Acme Speed Shop
864-370-3000
Website: www.acmespeedshop.com
hapwaldrop@acmespeedshop.com



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-02-05 05:58 AM by Speedracer.


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Yankeedriver Avatar
Yankeedriver Platinum AdvertiserAdvertiser Joel Young
Albuquerque, NM, USA   USA
In reply to # 3675121 by Speedracer FWIW a dynalite would be going with a smaller front caliper, not the way to go, this is what we used for rear brakes on the SCCA race cars. it was a silly idea 7 years ago and it still is.

Thank you, Hap. I'll stay away from that option.

Charlie D. has reported excellent results using the Sentra front caliper, which provides perfect bias on his Morris Minor fitted with Sentra rear discs, too. If I can't find a properly sized light-weight front Wilwood or other option, I'll likely stay with that setup. It could be that VW/Audi has an aluminum, full-sized front caliper that may fit, but I just haven't started that research yet.

Neat thing about that option is it enables use of a true ventillated front disc--not just a drilled single/solid rotor, as with other 'big brake' kits.

Joel


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halloween Gregg B
Sheridan, WY, USA   USA
Unsprung weight is any weight not supported by the springs, i.e; wheels,axles, brakes, roughly half of the a arms and half of the springs, etc. Two reasons to reduce unsprung weight; less inertia to start and stop a lighter wheel, and better handling. Would you rather run an obstacle course with a 100# weight on your back or two 50# weights strapped on your ankles?
GB

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