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How to remove fuel pump

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pierremgb Avatar
pierremgb Pierre Backstrom
skelleftea, Sweden   SWE
Hi,

Now it's time to do something with the fuel pump
because it stopped twice this summer,
But after one or two hits it's started to run.
It have own the car for 29 year's.

To remowe the fuel pump
is it just straight forward work?
Or is it some trick's and tips you can give me or
is somehing that I should think about when removing it
from the car.

I have just planned to replace the contact braker is that enough ?

You can see my car
mgb -70 on the link below

http://www.rexnet.se/roybac1

/Pierre,
SkellefteƄ
close to Artic Circle

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Fairfield, CA, USA   USA
I think if you crawl under there and look, all will be revealed.

You may need to come up with a way to prevent the fuel tank from emptying on you. Suggesting (a) drive it until it is empty or near so, (b) have a suitable container to catch the remainder (likely to be a gallon or more) or (c) in combination with (b), plan to shove a bolt into the loose hose and clamp it off as a plug.

petersp83 Avatar
petersp83 Peter Devine
Rockville Centre & Long Beach, NY, USA   USA
I replaced mine and here's some pointers. Some I learned the hard way.

Suggestion: If you're going to replace the fuel pump, invest in a new copper fuel line or at least that section from the tank to the pump. The flanged ends are very important as is the "angle" you position the new pump at. Also, buy a new fuel filter, have it ready to go at same time. It'll eliminate troubleshooting that stuff if something goes wrong with installing pump. Also, before ordering, look at the new fuel pump. The "new ones" need a fitting kit along with it sometimes.

Step 1: Disconnect power lead and ground wire, note which is which and inspect condition

Step 2: Take a good look at the angle of the pump, particularly the angle of the flanged fittings from copper fuel lines

Get a suitable container and a rag of some sort, keep close by

Step 3: Remove the gas line pipe fitting leading from the gas tank. Absolutely do this first

Step 4: Remove the gas line fitting into the fuel pump from that disconnected line from gas tank

Then, remove the fuel line that leads to front of car, inspect, and replace if worn

Then, before taking the old fuel pump out, note position of unit inside mounting bracket. May need to squirt some lubricant on the hardware that the mounting bracket uses.

Remove old fuel pump, and replace any part of fuel line that looks like it's "old".

Put new fuel pump into its bracket and be sure to clean and lubricate rubber sleeve. Do mock fitting to make sure that you have the angle needed for each fuel line. It cannot be overstated how important it is that you get the angle right.

Assuming that you've got the angle right, --- which is the whole key --- tighten mounting bracket (fuel pump end with points and connection leads towards battery compartment) and then hook up fuel line connections at pump.

Tighten back up the new (or re -used) fuel line connection at gas tank.

Then, hook back up the ground and power leads.

If you've installed it right and the pump is good, you'll hear a clicking sound when the key is turned on, then when it fills up the float. Hopefully you'll be good to go.

If not, then you've got an electrical problem (like I had, which I fixed by running a new wire from fuse box to fuel pump).

Good luck!

Peter

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SURFIT Avatar
SURFIT Gold Member Mike Schultz
Zionsville, IN, USA   USA
You will get some fuel spilled on you.

Wear rubber gloves, safety glasses and cover-alls.

Unhook the battery ground first and have a fire extinguisher available.

You don't need to empty fuel tank. Only what fuel is in the lines runs out.

I would consider replacing the rubber fuel lines and the rubber mounting grommet while you are at it.

I just did this - - went to a "solid state" S U fuel pump from a "points" fuel pump - -
in a couple of hours.



Mike

'73 MGB

Gary3000 Gary Reisman
Sherman Oaks, California, USA   USA
realize this is an older thread, but seems to apply to my situation..
went to start up my 1974 (with SU fuel pump), and next thing I know there's a puddle of gas underneath in my garage.
even after shutting the car/pump off, it continued with a small stream of gas, and the only way to stop it was crimping the rubber hose with a vise-grip.
couldn't tell just where the leak was originating, but imagine replacement is required, or since it still runs, do people repair them?

so do I tow it to a mechanic? let them figure out what's leaking and fix/replace?
or attempt to fix/replace it myself?
Can I access and work on the pump by merely jacking up the car/removing the rear wheel and putting it on stands?
been quite awhile since I worked on my B myself, but think it's something I might be able to tackle on my own?

Simon Austin Avatar
"Can I access and work on the pump by merely jacking up the car/removing the rear wheel and putting it on stands?"

Yes. You'll be able to see the fuel pump one you remove the wheel. Photo attached of what you're looking for. You need to determine where the leak is coming from.

Could be a ruptured rubber line, rusty hard line or the pump itself. Report back when you've had a look. Then we can help you fix the issue.



"Speed costs........how fast you want to spend?"


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Gary3000 Gary Reisman
Sherman Oaks, California, USA   USA
In reply to # 3607790 by Simon Austin "Can I access and work on the pump by merely jacking up the car/removing the rear wheel and putting it on stands?"

Yes. You'll be able to see the fuel pump one you remove the wheel. Photo attached of what you're looking for. You need to determine where the leak is coming from.

Could be a ruptured rubber line, rusty hard line or the pump itself. Report back when you've had a look. Then we can help you fix the issue.

Thanks for the prompt reply,. and encouragement!
guess first off, compared to that picture, my pump is rotated 180 degrees compared to that one in the picture. (and not nearly as clean!!).
but guess I'll borrow some jack stands and see what I can do. car isn't drivable either way, so may as well see how far I can go on my own.

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MGB567 Avatar
MGB567 Gold Member Barrie Braxton
Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia   AUS
1966 MG MGB MkI "Money Guzzler"
1979 MG MGB GT V8 Conversion "Darkside"
Just so you know that picture that Simon shows is the correct orientation for a SU pump - anything else seems not to be the optimum. You should look at Dave DuBois' pages for anything to do with SU pumps.



Convertible: CKD 11/66 first registered 8/5/67. Owned since 3/77. 90% original sheet metal. 18GB +40 balanced with almost all new internals. Peter Burgess big valve fast road head. Piper 285. Fidanza FW. Basil's followers and pushrods. TR7clutch. TT exhaust. ARP everywhere. 123 ign. Needham 4synchro c/r box.. Stock rebuilt/replaced suspension. Superpro bushes. New brakes all round including all pipes in SS flex. Interior redone. CAMS approved roll bar and side bars. Lots more. Hybrid of o/e and show/fast road car. Not for sale - it's my toy!

GT: UK car built/sold December '78. Stripped back to bare shell (with extensive bodywork to come). Powered by 'worked' Rover 5 litre V8 (ex TVR Chimera) with efi. T5 box. FC IFS. CCE rear attached to Salisbury axle with Quaife. And a whole lot more to yet to come. Stealth is the word.

Donthuis Avatar
Donthuis Don van Riet
Rijswijk, ZH, Netherlands   NLD
Your build year may still have the metal line to the tank in, as I have with my 1972 as well, so your cars pump setup looks different. I include a picture from another MGE member for this version

This does not change the pump orientation, but the way the hose to the front and the line to the back run is different. In this setup I found it easier to start with the pump turned somewhat and connect the banjo bolt with the rubber hose piece that connects to the metal line running to the front of the car first and then turn the pump so that the metal line to the tank can be connected without any bending. After all, the rubber hose permits this turning while the metal line does not (my original factory line was very rigid, I replaced it by a newer, copper one, but even so bending should be minimized).

IMO one should never re-install the old SU type with the mechanical contacts, they are temperamental bastards and there is no reason not to go to an electronic pump (SU or Hardi are the easiest to mount, since both are compatible with the banjo's on the old SU pump). For the later SU's the inner fibre rings were replaced with sealing rings, Hardi keeps the original fibre rings on both sides)

With the tank on low gas level it is enough to lift the car up on the right side and with the rear wheel removed uncouple the old pump from its hoses, feed and earth lines etc and loosen the clamp holding it in place. Gas will stop flowing quickly or not flow at all. The clamp holding the pump is the last to tighten after turning and connecting the hard line. BTW the Hardi is just a bit smaller, so tighten well.

I once exchanged my older SU with my spare Hardi on vacation WITHOUT removal of the right rear wheel and lifting the car higher (the tank was near to empty).
But at home do as told above, you do not need to maneouver in narrow spaces as I had (see 2nd picture).

PS If your banjo connection from the metal line on the tank to the bottom pump joint keeps on sweating, despite using new fiber washers, just renew the hollow banjo bolt too.
This summer very hard tightening of the old bolt never removed this sweating and gas odour was persistent. Back home a new bolt and new washers quickly put an end to this cool smiley

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the omega man Avatar
the omega man phil wilkins
staffordshire, Stafford, UK   GBR
2 things spring to mind.why did mg put the pump in such an awkward position ( along with the distributor ) .And why didn't su make the fuel pump in two halves, so that when you need a new pump you just undo two bolts and remove the pump body, fit a new rubber gasket, and the part with the fuel lines need never be removed.

ddubois Avatar
ddubois Gold Member Dave DuBois
Bremerton, WA, USA   USA
The very first thing to do is to jack the right rear of the car up and remove the wheel. Next remove (or at least loosen the connection) on the end of the fuel tank - this will break the siphon from the tank to the pump and the only fuel that will be lost is that which is in the fuel line. From there it is pretty easy.
Cheers,



Dave DuBois
1953 MGTD
1966 MGB
http://homepages.donobi.net/sufuelpumps/


Member Services:
SU fuel pump restoration and conversion to solid state. Information and technical articles on SU fuel pumps.
tjt77 timothy Trevithick
Grass Valley, California, USA   USA
"2 things spring to mind.why did mg put the pump in such an awkward position ( along with the distributor )"
the fuel pump is not in an awkward position.. compared to most other cars its very easy to access.. the most obvious reason as to why its where it is due to common sense of the designer (Don Hayter was one of those involved) .. about level with tank and close to it .. being a 'pusher' pumps its all located closer to tank than carbs. Engine distributor:- the BMC B series engine was not designed around the MGB ..it is an Austin design that followed their standard practices and had commonalities with most of their other engines .. the 1800c displacement was initially unique to the MGB.. but then improved in late '64 with a 5 main bearing crank and utilized in many other BMC vehicles.. the first of which was the Austin 1800 sedan (commonly refered to a the "Land crab" ) could be the largest number of them went into the Sherpa van and its variants.. (which also had the 1622cc as its 'base' engine up to around '76) the distributor is also very accessible compared with many contemporary cars.

the omega man Avatar
the omega man phil wilkins
staffordshire, Stafford, UK   GBR
Sorry, but I've worked in drawing offices all my life. If I had worked with Don Hayter I would have asked him the same questions.

ddubois Avatar
ddubois Gold Member Dave DuBois
Bremerton, WA, USA   USA
There are two positions for the fuel pump in the MGBs. The first is in the right rear wheel well as shown in the above pictures. The position of the fuel pump in the later MGB (not sure exactly when the change was made) is through the forward bulkhead of the trunk. Neither position is all that bad to get in or out. If you want to see difficult installation, take a look at the Jaguars.
Cheers,



Dave DuBois
1953 MGTD
1966 MGB
http://homepages.donobi.net/sufuelpumps/


Member Services:
SU fuel pump restoration and conversion to solid state. Information and technical articles on SU fuel pumps.
tjt77 timothy Trevithick
Grass Valley, California, USA   USA
"If you want to see difficult installation, take a look at the Jaguars." Agreed... the 2 seater Jags do not have readily accessible fuel pumps..and they are heavy to jack up to get suffiecnt clearance if you dont have a hoist. However the small sedans (Mk1 and Mk2) have excellent access to fuel pump ..its in the trunk , in r/h fender well.. no jacking and not too much bending either.. Ive got it down to 20 mins in total to replace a Mk2 Jag pump.. (which includes fumbling for tools and scratching head and ass a couple o times)

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