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Signs & Evidence that a car has been Cobbled together?

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danthefitman Avatar
danthefitman Dan H
Portland, OR, USA   USA
1979 MG MGB MkIII "Simply, A Great B!"
What are the true signs & evidence that a car has been Cobbled together? Often times skillfully hidden by the experienced seller...

[Versus being unmolested] and original / OEM from the factory?

Do tell fellas!



1st Place Winner ABFM Portland Oregon 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 & 2016!
Email me for questions or needs, I'll respond promptly! dan@allpointsorganized.com
Life. Positively in order.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-02-12 08:50 PM by danthefitman.

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Mustangsix Avatar
Mustangsix Gold Member Jack Collins
Orlando, FL, USA   USA
Here's a couple:

Any car with an engine compartment or boot spray bombed in black.

Any car festooned with more MG logos than you can count (ok, maybe not cobbled, just taste)

Any car with vacuum hoses plugged off with bolts.

Any car that has had the fender beading filled in.


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late 64 Terry O
Milton, Ont, Canada   CAN
Thurlowb Avatar
Thurlowb Silver Member Brad Thurlow
Coquitlam, BC, Canada   CAN
In reply to # 3680296 by late 64 see this post.......
http://www.mgexp.com/phorum/read.php?1,3680155

Ha...perfect!

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DrewM Avatar
DrewM Silver Member Drew Maddock
74 MGB roadster, Southern California, USA   USA
Look carefully inside both trunk and engine bay at the seams and paint. Any car that was wrecked may have had one end or the other crushed, and a bad repair job will show in seams and welding that isn't straight, mismatched panel edges, new paint and overspray. There are good repairs and bad, and a minor fender bender repaired really well can be just fine. But bad repairs mean you must walk away. Fast.

For repainting, badges and number plates (and so on) often aren't removed, so they get overspray on their edges. This is pretty obvious stuff. And paint inside the trunk or engine is easy to notice.

I bought a used Honda Accord a bit too quickly once. I needed it for my daughter and was in a bit of a rush, so since it seemed to be in good shape and drove well, I didn't look too carefully. Later I saw paint overspray in both trunk and engine bay. Both the front and rear panels had been resprayed. Alarm bells.

Fortunately, no one including a body shop could find evidence of any actual repaired metal, so I dodged a bullet. Apparently, someone (owner or dealer) thought both ends had too many nicks and scratches, so they resprayed it. I've done that, myself, on perfectly good cars just to spruce them up a bit. So paint doesn't prove accident damage. But be on the lookout. On the other hand, I'm much less concerned if someone installs the wrong year door cards, the "wrong" lights, or a different this-or-that as long as it looks right and is in good shape. But accident damage, rust, mismatched panels, and so on can make a car a rolling disaster.



Drew Maddock, So. Calif. USofA

tvrgeek Avatar
tvrgeek Silver Member Scott S
Hillsborough, North Carolinia, USA   USA
1965 MG MGB
Any car just "restored" by a shop or owner. If it was correctly done, they would probably not be flipping it or the price would reflect the real cost of a restoration and very few of us could afford it.

PS: The rear wing seams are flat ugly and as the fender is welded on anyway, proper filling should not be considered a hack job, but a decision for a cleaner look. The repair pieces for below the taillight will not show a seam even if correctly done. Don't expect a $150K OEM perfect restoration to be for sale for $12K.



Cogito ergo sum periculoso

NOHOME P P
O, ON, Canada   CAN
1967 MG MGB GT "Maggie (GT From Hell)"
In reply to # 3680256 by danthefitman What are the true signs & evidence that a car has been Cobbled together? Often times skillfully hidden by the experienced seller...

[Versus being unmolested] and original / OEM from the factory?

Do tell fellas!

What is your definition of " cobbled together"?

I could put forth that any car that has required a rotisserie restoration has been "Cobbled Together".

benhutcherson Avatar
benhutcherson Gold Member Ben Hutcherson
Louisville/Frankfort, KY, USA   USA
1970 MG MGB
As said, cobbled together could be a bit of a broad term.

I've seen well done CB conversions on high-dollar restorations. By a strict definition, these are "cobbled together" but when well done can look good. Of course, I've also seen bad CB conversions. One give-away of a bad one is to look at the base of the tail lights and see if the sheet metal is flush-if not, someone cut corners.

Aside from some part changes from other years, the major parts in my car are more or less as it came in 1970. Someone who knows MGs would probably arch their eyes at my seats, though. They are at least original frames as one would find on a 1970, but the PO re-covered them in a covers more appropriate to a Mk 1 car. I like it, so I haven't bothered to change.

There are things that are a matter of taste. There's one person I know of here who puts the 1980LE steering wheel on every car he drives. I toss that out as an example as he likes that wheel and finds it comfortable(this is someone who uses MGs as his main vehicles) so I don't think anyone would fault him. The cars were made for 18 years, and with varying amounts of work many parts are interchangeable between years. It can usually be undone if it bothers you, but many folks do this make a car that they enjoy more.

That kind of stuff only bothers me when something is presented as a 100% correct original quality restoration.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-02-13 06:22 AM by benhutcherson.

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albeegreen1 Avatar
albeegreen1 Gold Member bob tresch
bordentown, NJ, USA   USA
1972 MG MGB MkIII "ALBERT"
Check the forward section of the car's engine compartment In front of the radiator support. Early "B"s front end's could be re welded with a different plate number. Make sure all numbers match your old and new title.

riley1489 Avatar
riley1489 Gold Member Bruce H
Great White North, QC, Canada   CAN
1953 Jaguar XK120
1959 Riley 1.5 "King George"
1973 MG MGB
If the car wears a down draught carburetor, has a cube noisy fuel pump fitted, has meters of black wire with taped terminations and junctions, (OK to use domestic wiring nuts winking smiley) has had self adhesive side mouldings installed, these sorts of things spell COBBLE. devil smiley

B



Check your ego Amigo!

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ClayJ Avatar
ClayJ Silver Member Clay Johnston
Mt. Olive, MS, USA   USA
1972 MG MGB
The permanent crossmember at the rear of the transmission has been cut away (I assume to get the transmission out) and a piece of channel iron stock lag screwed in it's place. I've seen this crossmember missing on several cars.

No seams where there should be seams (unless it is an intentional restomod).

Wrinkled sheet metal on the inner front fender panels, the horizontal flat panel in front of the radiator, the vertical flat panel between the wheel wheels, trunk floor, body channels under the trunk deck at the rear and body channels forward of the firewall.

Poorly fitted panels, either cobbled from other cars or didn't take the time to fit properly.

tomkatb Avatar
tomkatb Larry Baygents
Dayton, Ohio, USA   USA
1963 MG MGB
From the Frankstein perspective? I do not know how many I have seen with really mixed year stuff.

Because everything is available there should be no need for a lot of that. Except when combining several mixed year parts cars cobbled together to make one.

Own a copy of Original MGB Anders Clausager.



L.W.(Larry)Baygents
63B
77 Spit

benhutcherson Avatar
benhutcherson Gold Member Ben Hutcherson
Louisville/Frankfort, KY, USA   USA
1970 MG MGB
In reply to # 3680534 by tomkatb Because everything is available there should be no need for a lot of that.

There again, it's sometimes done for preference and taste reasons and not in the name of originality.

At the end of the day, a lot of folks buy these cars for the fun of driving them.

One of the things that probably changed more than anything else was the interior with major changes(in the US) in 68, 73, and 77. I personally love the simple and spartan layout of the earliest interiors, but I also know folks who prefer some of the "creature comforts" of later interiors. Thus, finding hybrids that suit the owner's taste are not that uncommon.

This isn't an overly visible change, but my 1970(18GH engine) has a 12H2923 head from a 73-76 on it. When I needed a valve job and knew I'd probably be sourcing another head anyway, I actively sought out one of these out. The combustion chamber volume is smaller than a 62-72(US) head, so when put on an earlier engine increases the compression ratio.

tampaguy Avatar
tampaguy Jack Shea
Elgin, OR, USA   USA
If you must ask this question please obtain someone with experience before entering this arena

albeegreen1 Avatar
albeegreen1 Gold Member bob tresch
bordentown, NJ, USA   USA
1972 MG MGB MkIII "ALBERT"
I myself find it most unpleasant when inspecting a car is finding the hard fuel lines cut at the pump for a "cube" as Bruce states. Would not want to attempt to replace to originals. Moss has a Frankenstein or Fraukenstien pump repair kit. It tells you a lot about the previous owner.

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