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Paint - started painting my 76 MGB - need some advice

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SonnyK Sonny K
Derby, VT, USA   USA
1976 MG MGB
So i started painting my B and I actually painted the whole car a couple of weeks ago. So it has a base coat of the color red I want. I sanded out dirt and got it ready to paint 3rd coat. Today I did the rear quarter panels and trunk lid. This is my first time painting a car so I'm taking it slow, doing a little at a time. Anyway, It's certainly not close to a professional paint job but in all honestly it don't look to bad. I'm painting in my (enclosed) garage and I only do a litt at a time because of the fumes. That said even after cleaning and using a tack rag and being very careful to do it right, I still got specks of dirt in the paint. I plan on clear coating it. My question is, now as I mentioned that there are specks of dirt in the paint. Not a lot but enough to see and feel. Should I clear coat then wet sand of wet sand then clear coat? I pretty sure I should wet sand first then clear coat then polish and buff. Any suggestions? What grit should I use for wet sanding? Appreciate any feedback. I'm just a backyard painter, no experience, but doing the best I can. Now when i bought the car, it was full of dings, scratches, (some really deep) some dents and faded paint. I only removed the bumpers, badges, trim and the interior. I was just hoping to make it a little nicer looking. This is not a restoration by any means.

Thanks
Sonny



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-02-13 06:04 PM by SonnyK.

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2455 Avatar
2455 Bill Rogers
ocklawaha, FL, USA   USA
The dust and dirt you'r talking about may be over spray and yes after you clear coat it you will need to water sand and buff
i would start with nothing less than 1000 wet paper and maybe higher do a small spot first oh yes keep plenty water on the paper and clean
it out offton i like the 3M buffing compound and a finser hope this helps

Jim Stabe Avatar
San Diego, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 3680142 by SonnyK So i started painting my B and I actually painted the whole car a couple of weeks ago. So it has a base coat of the color red I want. I sanded out dirt and got it ready to paint 3rd coat. Today I did the rear quarter panels and trunk lid. This is my first time painting a car so I'm taking it slow, doing a little at a time. Anyway, It's certainly not close to a professional paint job but in all honestly it don't look to bad. I'm painting in my (enclosed) garage and I only do a litt at a time because of the fumes. That said even after cleaning and using a tack rag and being very careful to do it right, I still got specks of dirt in the paint. I plan on clear coating it. My question is, now as I mentioned that there are specks of dirt in the paint. Not a lot but enough to see and feel. Should I clear coat then wet sand of wet sand then clear coat? I pretty sure I should wet sand first then clear coat then polish and buff. Any suggestions? What grit should I use for wet sanding? Appreciate any feedback. I'm just a backyard painter, no experience, but doing the best I can. Now when i bought the car, it was full of dings, scratches, (some really deep) some dents and faded paint. I only removed the fenders and badges and trim and the interior. I was just hoping to make it a little nicer looking. This is not a restoration by any means.

Thanks
Sonny

I'm doing the same thing with mine. You want to get the trash out before you clear coat or you will be sealing it in. Wet sand with 600-800 and get rid of the orange peel and any trash. Just make sure you don't thin out the red so spots show through. Before you spray the clear try wiping with an anti static cloth, it may stop some of the dust from being attracted. You may have to do some sanding between clear coats if you get some trash in it. If you do you know that any trash in the final product is on top of the last coat and will be removed when you cut and buff. When you color sand the final coat of clear start with 1000 and work your way to 3000, it will make buffing a breeze.



Jim

"If you want me to agree with you then we would both be wrong"

'66 MGB widened 11" with supercharged LT1 Chevy and 6 speed, C4 Corvette suspension
Pictures here Part 1 http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,7581
Continued in Part 2 http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,22422
Continued in Part 3 http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,33108
Continued in Part 4 http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,40751
Continued in Part 5 http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,48698,48698#msg-48698

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oleanderjoe Avatar
oleanderjoe Gold Member Joseph Baba
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
All good advise here. Hard to comment without actually being up close and personal. Base coat can usually sit 72 hours before clear coat. After that a light sanding would be required. "Check the spec sheet for your brand of paint and recommendations I usually shoot the base one day usually in the morning Nib it down with scotchbrite in the afternoon. Let it sit overnight, Tack rag the next day and clear coat. Everybody has their method. I shoot in my home garage also, no paint booth. so I understand. 99.9 % of the dust and inperfections will sand and buff out. The only thing I can see in the attached pictures, is the "PLASTIC" masking.
Use the proper paper, NOT NEWS PAPER" Creates a LOT of dust, Paint that lands on the plastic flakes off and also creates a problem Just my observatipons. Cheers


Member Services:
NOHOME P P
O, ON, Canada   CAN
1967 MG MGB GT "Maggie (GT From Hell)"
Late in the game, but should the car not be grounded so as to avoid any static build-up that would attract the paint mist?

Also you mention weeks between color coats...I was under the impression that the open time for more coats tended to be on the order of 24 hours? At least that is what the data sheets that I have read say.

Pete

Rick Fawthrop Avatar
Rick Fawthrop Gold Member Richard Fawthrop
Seattle, WA, USA   USA
I don’t know where to start.
First wear a tyvek spray suit if you don’t allready.
Tack rag and blow off the car 4 times not just once.
If you are using an automotive type plastic for masking make sure you are using the proper side.
You should have enough air flow to be able to spray the entire car. Go rent some fans that are used to dry carpet out after flooding if you need to.
I would use 800 grit on a DA with an interface pad.
Find some videos on YouTube from The Gunman. Search gunman painter so you don’t get a tacky Sean Penn movie.
Watch his videos on flow coating but keep in mind you will not be able to slam clear on like he does because you don’t have the high temperature he does or the experience.
If you don’t have the hook it interface pads for your DA buy one. This is a must have for color sanding.
But I assume you are having a good time.
Enjoy.

AdamFromOz Adam Paterson
Newcastle, NSW, Australia   AUS
Another tip I was given when I painted my first mini was to keep the ground damp. Just give it a spray with a fine spray of water. It settles any dust and overspray so you don’t kick it up when you move.

boggsy64 Avatar
boggsy64 Platinum Member Ken Boggs
Brooksville, KY, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB "Dad's Hand Me Down"
Joe, is right you need to check with the manufacturer. My Two part called for the clear to be sprayed NO MORE than 24 hrs after last base coat, preferably right after the base had flashed. I laid down 3 final paint coats and then 4 coats clear all back to back in the same day. I was having NO luck at eliminating all small dust specs and I am sure you will not either.
Most all will cut and buff out of the clear coat, starting with 1500 grit to 2000 then buffing

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lokiufgator Avatar
lokiufgator Mike S
Evington, VA, USA   USA
X2. If you've ever really swept out your garage you'd know how much fine dust is in there. Before I paint I bring out the big leaf blower and start from the back and blow to the doors. Might take an hour or 2 but it's worth it, then get the fine mist sprayer on the hose and get the concrete wet to help trap the remaining dust. That way the air from the spray gun can't move it around.

In reply to # 3680372 by AdamFromOz Another tip I was given when I painted my first mini was to keep the ground damp. Just give it a spray with a fine spray of water. It settles any dust and overspray so you don’t kick it up when you move.

Sinewave Avatar
Sinewave T. Keith Vezina
Kenner, LA, USA   USA
That sure is glossy for base coat. What paint system are you using? Some base coats can be sprayed without an activator and has an open topcoat window.

Most of the crap you are going to get in the paint will come from you and your clothes - a Tyvek suit is a must. That corrugated door will hold a lot of dirt too. I would recommend you wash down the garage the day before painting.



T. Keith Vezina
British Motoring Club New Orleans
1976 MGB, 1976 MGB Trailer & 1967 MGB MK. I

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SonnyK Sonny K
Derby, VT, USA   USA
1976 MG MGB
That pic is actually the final coat before clear coating that I did on the rear end. And I didn't really want to mention this....but it's Rustoleum out of a spray can! Like I said in my post, this is not a restoration, I just wanted to paint it so it would look better, and I didn't want to spend a lot of money.

Thanks

2455 Avatar
2455 Bill Rogers
ocklawaha, FL, USA   USA
Are you sure you can put clear over that paint I seen someone try that and it didn't work if it was me i would just water sand it and buff confused smiley

Vic92 Avatar
Vic92 Silver Member Timothy Cook A
Trenton, NJ, USA   USA
1975 MG MGB
Not bad for rattle can.Take a piece of scrap metal and spray with your paint and then spray your clearcoat onto it,any bubbling or wrinkle will show compounds not compatible,and look out for fish eyes which will show up on non preped surfeses.Suit is a good suggestion,also wet down your floor to prevent dust everytime you take a step.Never sanded rustoleum but would try all methods mentioned here on a sample surface.

ls1ac Avatar
ls1ac scott sommer
bristol, WI, USA   USA
A little late but I usually use a small box fan with a filter both front and back to gently blow clean air into the work space and out under the door. slight positive pressure seems to help with nuggies.Tape and cardboard to seal. lots of blowing all around the area before starting an covering walls and everything I could. Then as above.

cstrong45 Avatar
cstrong45 Charles Strong
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA   USA
In reply to # 3680805 by Vic92 Not bad for rattle can.Take a piece of scrap metal and spray with your paint and then spray your clearcoat onto it,any bubbling or wrinkle will show compounds not compatible,and look out for fish eyes which will show up on non preped surfeses.Suit is a good suggestion,also wet down your floor to prevent dust everytime you take a step.Never sanded rustoleum but would try all methods mentioned here on a sample surface.
Love that primrose

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