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I’m insulating my garage!

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lorwood Avatar
lorwood Ed S
Ridge, New York, USA   USA
1979 MG MGB
You may want to go with something other than OSB which when exposed has a tendency to swell with moisture changes. I used 1/4 inch sanded plywood , 1x6 pine for base molding 1x4 for a crown molding and covered the seams where the plywood met with 1x4.



"He rides 'er low on the hip, on the side he's got "Bound for Glory" in red, white and blue flash paint
He leans on the hood telling racing stories, the kids call him Jimmy the Saint".."And I said, "Hey kid, you think that's oil? Man, that ain't oil, that's blood"
I wonder what he was thinking when he hit that storm, or was he just lost in the flood?"

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MGBear Brett Woods
East Stroudsburg, PA, USA   USA


I put fiberglass batting between the studs, covered the walls with faux brick fiber board, and cut a doorway (you see to the right) into my work shop, which has a wood stove.

I can attest to the statement that Mitchman2 made, my garage was bare bones framing and it was a place I didn't want to be in the winter. Now I just light the stove, pick and project and go to work. All my projects went from being chores, to being comfortable and even fun in the winter to stave off those dark at 5pm winter blues.

lorwood Avatar
lorwood Ed S
Ridge, New York, USA   USA
1979 MG MGB
Also if you are going to keep the cathedral ceiling you need to create a passive air flow system between the insulation and the underside of the roof.

They sell sheets of plastic with channels that nail up between the rafters before you insulate. You will need vents installed in the soffits of the garage and a ridge vent cut into the peak of the roof.

Roofs take a lot of heat without ventilation the roof will fail prematurely as will any replacement roof.

IMHO I would keep the heat but ditch the a/c (which will be terribly inefficient in the space) in favor of a car lift.



"He rides 'er low on the hip, on the side he's got "Bound for Glory" in red, white and blue flash paint
He leans on the hood telling racing stories, the kids call him Jimmy the Saint".."And I said, "Hey kid, you think that's oil? Man, that ain't oil, that's blood"
I wonder what he was thinking when he hit that storm, or was he just lost in the flood?"



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-14 06:50 AM by lorwood.

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Speedracer Avatar
Speedracer Platinum Member Hap Waldrop
Greenville, SC, USA   USA
1967 MG MGB Racecar "The Biscuit"
Yes, having good heat and AC is game changer. For us here in the South, AC is probably more important than heat, I have had AC in big downtown shop for about 4-5 years now, cost me about $100 a month to have in energy bills, but I probably get that back tenfold in productivity. I have gas heat in the big shop, love it.

At the new shop to be built at the house I will have 14" ceiling height at the bottom of the trusses, but I will put a insulated drop ceiling in at the bottom of trusses. I did this in the 24x24 at the house years ago, and could hang meat in that place with the AC on a 100 degree day, and could have it off, then turn it on and reach cool temps in 30 minutes.

Now days with all these modern thermostats you can set at lower/higher setting when you are not going to be the shop and then make it adjust automatically when you are going to be in the shop. At the big shop, I cut the AC off every night, and then have it set to come on at 7AM, works great. Another thing in b ig area, think about actually what you can live with as for as temps, I really want the shop much warmer than 60 degree, in the summer I can live with anything 80, or under. Mind you in the old days, I saw 100-105 in the shop in the heat of the summer. Also in a big area, fans can be your friends , even with heat and AC to move the air around, and even concentrate where you need it the most.



Hap Waldrop
Acme Speed Shop
864-370-3000
Website: www.acmespeedshop.com
hapwaldrop@acmespeedshop.com


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B-racer Avatar
B-racer Jeff Schlemmer
Shakopee, Minnesota, USA   USA
1950 Willys Jeep Pickup "Ratrod"
1971 MG MGB
2014 Dodge Charger
HVAC design background...
Up to 5% of your heat is lost through the floors, roughly 10% through the walls (depending on doors and windows), and the other 85%+ through the roof. Insulate a dropped ceiling with an air gap between it and the roof and you can allow solar gain (and winter loss) from affecting the interior heat as much. Up here in MN, R38 is the minimum standard for the ceiling. Drop ceiling with a vapor barrier, plus 18"+ of blown-in fiberglass. Insulate the roof directly and you'll continue to lose 20% of your heat as well as significantly damage the roof in 5-10 years. Make sure at a bare minimum that there is ventilation from the soffits through the roof joists and has a place to vent outdoors either via installed roof vents or a ridge vent - if you want AC to ever work.

Personally, I'd use sheetrock not plywood. Cheaper, smoother, collects less dust, easier to paint and get a bright surface to reflect light like Lee's photo. Unpainted plywood will take triple the light to achieve a similar lighting effect.



jeff@advanceddistributors.com

lorwood Avatar
lorwood Ed S
Ridge, New York, USA   USA
1979 MG MGB
In reply to # 3627347 by B-racer HVAC design background...
Up to 5% of your heat is lost through the floors, roughly 10% through the walls (depending on doors and windows), and the other 85%+ through the roof. Insulate a dropped ceiling with an air gap between it and the roof and you can allow solar gain (and winter loss) from affecting the interior heat as much. Up here in MN, R38 is the minimum standard for the ceiling. Drop ceiling with a vapor barrier, plus 18"+ of blown-in fiberglass. Insulate the roof directly and you'll continue to lose 20% of your heat as well as significantly damage the roof in 5-10 years. Make sure at a bare minimum that there is ventilation from the soffits through the roof joists and has a place to vent outdoors either via installed roof vents or a ridge vent - if you want AC to ever work.

Personally, I'd use sheetrock not plywood. Cheaper, smoother, collects less dust, easier to paint and get a bright surface to reflect light like Lee's photo. Unpainted plywood will take triple the light to achieve a similar lighting effect.

A sketch of what Jeff is talking about.



"He rides 'er low on the hip, on the side he's got "Bound for Glory" in red, white and blue flash paint
He leans on the hood telling racing stories, the kids call him Jimmy the Saint".."And I said, "Hey kid, you think that's oil? Man, that ain't oil, that's blood"
I wonder what he was thinking when he hit that storm, or was he just lost in the flood?"


Attachments:
roof detail.jpg    8.4 KB
roof detail.jpg

Ryan Reis Avatar
Beatrice, NE, USA   USA
1968 MG MGB
Jeff, you didn't realize everything you didn't know, did you? Anyway, I get what you're doing. Adding a little insulation and not breaking the bank. On my last house I did basically the same thing. Roll insulation between the studs covered by 1/2" OSB. It worked fine. I bought 5 gallons of cheap white paint and rolled it on the OSB to help seal it from moisture. I had a 220 electric heater that I only ran when working on the cars. No, it never got "warm" in the garage on really cold days but I could work out there without freezing.

I like the furnace idea but it takes up room I don't have and I also worry about blowing myself up. With the chemicals and paint I work with I'd rather pay for the electricity. Someday I'd really like to build a shop with a heated floor.



Ryan

Rod H. Avatar
Amity, Oregon, USA   USA
1964 MG MGB
1968 MG MGB GT
Sheetrock also is much better than plywood or OSB to retard fire!



I can't understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I'm frightened of the old ones. John Cage

'63 MGB
'68 MGBGT
'80 VW Vanagon Kombi
'09 Mazda 3 with 5 speed manual

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mowog1 Avatar
mowog1 Gold Member Rick Ingram
Saint Joseph, Illinois, USA   USA
1969 MG MGC "Vicky"
1972 MG MGB "Mallard"
1974 MG MGB GT V8 Conversion "The V8"
1978 MG MGB "Maggie"    & more
I tried insulting my barn.....but it just ignored me.

devil smiley

Oh wait........



1969 MGC - 1972 MGB - 1974&1/2 MGB/GT V8 conversion - 1978 MGB

mowog1@aol.com


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BusyB Platinum Member Sherman Bird
Houston, Texas, USA   USA
1978 MG MGB MkIV "Jerzy"
Being as how my shop was built in April, 2016, those forward looking, modern, new-fangled boys that put up metal buildings for a living recommended and did, as I agreed, use roof panels that had(have) a radiant barrier made upon the surface. When we Houstonians are experiencing those infamous hot as hell days where I can register 180 degree temps on cars parked in the driveway with my infra red thermo gun, the weatherman touts 110 degree heat indices, and the humidity is just plain sultry in the 90% and upwards ranges, I can aim aforementioned infrared gun to the inner roof surface (this would be the 4 inch batt insulation in direct contact with the roof panels) and see maybe 87 degree readings at the peak, which is 14 feet up during the times I'm running my A/C unit and fans. Down at the lower levels where we 6 foot tall folks really live, the temp is like 75 to 77 degrees. This, combined with much reduced humidity (About 55 %) and the air flow from 2 small fans, make working on cars downright fun again! In my old shop, those temps at the roof even with insulation were 115 degrees or so. The radiant barrier makes a huge difference.

Discocontented Avatar
Discocontented Erik Walter
MN, Crystal, USA   USA
1978 MG MGB "Vivian"
Just wondering why OSB.

OSB so you can hang stuff vs looking for studs? If you have an attached garage you have to have fire resistant sheetrock common walls with the house. Also, sheetrock is better at noise reduction and thermal insulation is a push. You also have to paint OSB to get the same light value as sheet rock. Plus - they make sheetrock in SE Iowa!

I'd have to agree on no electric - unless you can't pipe gas to the garage. Electric is crazy expensive in the winter vs gas (at least in MN.)

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BumbleB74 Avatar
BumbleB74 William Milholen
Tidewater, Tidewater VA, USA   USA
make sure you have decent seals for the garage door as well. That is something greatly lacking in my garage on my house.....need to get around to it.



1974-1/2 Roadster, "Bumble Bee", Corvette Yellow - in shambles, wire wheels
1976 Roadster, "Virus", Sandglow - "driver" condition (stock + 32/36 Weber DGEV, cast iron header, 25D distributor), bolt on wheels, ON the road!

pinkyponk Avatar
pinkyponk Gold Member Adrian Page
Berwick, Nova Scotia, Canada   CAN
My new and as yet unfinished "shop" has an electrically heated concrete slab. I used a roof cable meant for melting ice off the eves of poorly insulated houses.($100 CDN) I have time of day power rates so I pay half price for electricity at night. My house is heated the same way. I "charge" the slab up at night for cheap and it releases heat all day.

My new little shop is 12 x 18 feet and the cable was 1000 watts.(5watts/square foot) I still need to build the doors and insulate it. I'm using 6" fiberglass pink in the walls and ceiling. I will be boarding in the inside with gyprock on the walls and 1" styrofoam on the "cathedral ceiling" section. I need the high ceiling to accommodate my new lift. cool smiley

I used styrofoam on the sloped attic ceiling of my main shop last year and I'm pleased with the results. I gave the foam 2 coats of primer and 2 coats of gloss white paint to keep it clean and to keep it from yellowing. I'm sure it doesn't meet any kind of code but no one sleeps out there so I'm ok with it. The foam "boards in" the fiberglass and looks tidy while adding R value.

Adrian



Home built Eaton M62 Supercharger with 9psi boost, "stock" high ratio rocker arms, 8:1 compression, Piper 270 cam, ported head, matched manifolds, CB Performance computerized ignition.

melbaver Avatar
melbaver Gold Member Chris Howells
Broadwater NSW, Australia   AUS
1968 MG MGB "Moneypit"
1996 Jeep Cherokee "Shopping Trolley"
With all the systems I've seen described here not one mentions a foolproof source of continually circulating fresh air. Need to get a canary.



Chris Howells

1968 MGB Purchased already dis-assembled but which is largely back together so I'm a lot less ignorant.

mowog1 Avatar
mowog1 Gold Member Rick Ingram
Saint Joseph, Illinois, USA   USA
1969 MG MGC "Vicky"
1972 MG MGB "Mallard"
1974 MG MGB GT V8 Conversion "The V8"
1978 MG MGB "Maggie"    & more
In reply to # 3627624 by melbaver With all the systems I've seen described here not one mentions a foolproof source of continually circulating fresh air. Need to get a canary.

My barn is not that air-tight to have to be concerned..



1969 MGC - 1972 MGB - 1974&1/2 MGB/GT V8 conversion - 1978 MGB

mowog1@aol.com


Member Services:
Pieces of Eight! has provided gas-charged bonnet & bootlid strut kits for the MGB/MGC and hatch kits for the MGB/GT-MGC/GT since 1996. We have recently added MG Midget bonnet and bootlid kits to inventory. Contact Rick at: mowog1@aol.com

Attachments:
Ingram_9.JPG    35.9 KB
Ingram_9.JPG

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