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Big changes are coming for Acme Speed Shop

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tomkatb Avatar
tomkatb Larry Baygents
Dayton, Ohio, USA   USA
1963 MG MGB
The key to getting the best job for the least money is planning.

Having a plan and not changing your mind. Like, a normal garage opening will not allow a 3/4 ton truck in. Changes are expensive.

If you have a good plan construction is quicker, cheaper and the contractor makes the most money. It s a win win. People talking about spending twice what they though did a poor job of planning and paid for it. Dearly.



L.W.(Larry)Baygents
63B
77 Spit

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BH Davis Avatar
Thompson, CT, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB
Hap,

I've been down this road a few times over the years. Early on I realized that planning 10 years down the road while satisfying my current needs for a work space was most important.

When I built my previous shop in my back yard I had a choice of putting up a carriage shed/barn style building or spending about three times more money and putting up a cape style building that could eventually be subdivided off and finished off as a house. I opted to spend more and built a 1200 sq.ft. foot print building with no windows or interior walls. The 2nd floor was about 3/4 the size of the first floor, plus it had a full ground level accessible basement. All in all I had about 3200 sq.ft. in a building that had significant future value potential. A few years later I added a 24' x 32' carriage shed for storage space. If all I had built was that carriage shed I would have added little value to my property. By putting a house style building I added significantly to the value.

Fast forward 12 years and I moved my shop over to my restored school house building. This I was able to get cheap with the roof caved in and I again planned ahead by spending the money to do the restoration of the building. Two years later I'd spent a lot but had both a new shop building and a premium commercial building.

After moving the shop into the school house I spent 1 1/2 to 2 years converting that empty cape style building into a house. My wife and I moved into it about 6 or 7 years ago and and we've rented out the original house on the property since then.

I'm writing all this because I think you need to examine what you are going to see as a return down the road on the amount of money you put into putting up a building. If you put up an addition to your house, or a building out back, I suspect you would see less than a 50% of investment as added value to your property. If you can figure out a way to spend the same amount, or a little more, on a building on a separate lot then you stand to make a profit on the amount you spend putting up the building.

Good luck,
BH

Speedracer Avatar
Speedracer Platinum Member Hap Waldrop
Greenville, SC, USA   USA
1967 MG MGB Racecar "The Biscuit"
The last few days have been super stressful, come to find out, I can't put the shop where I wanted to, as a road set back changed that, so panic set in to come up with a plan that would work. Originally I wanted to build a 40x50, but now I am forced to use the space beside the house to avoid road setbacks. So in the last two days as the new buyer pressured me to sign a buyer agreement, I told him I had to drag my feet for a couple days as I gathered info. So after 2 days with county planning and codes, I now know the deal, it has change slightly as for the width, and length of the building. I have to be 87.5 feet away for the center of the road and no farther forward than the most forward end of my house, and at least 5 feet off the neighbor's property line, so with a little room to spare, looks like I can have max width of about 35 ft, and max length of about 60 feet, so while not the size I first imagined, it still works. Still undecided on the construction type, now it is between a pre-fabbed metal building kit, vs wood construction and making it look like the house. At this point I don't care if it looks like the house, or not, my family and myself have built at least 6 metal commercial metal building in our lifetime, one as big as 25.000 sq ft, so I am very familiar with them, and personally I don't mind the looks of the metal buildings, and am not over concerned with the property value of one vs the other, I'm not going anywhere unless I win the lottery and then it would not matter much, lol smiling smiley No matter what I do I am in the driver's seat as far as appreciation, even with the new shop cost, as I have been here over 35 years.

Here's a good question for some of you that have done this, eve height for a car lift, my newer commercial rental building was set up to do this and we used 16ft eaves for that building and for 11 years I did rent one side of it to a buddy of mine that did car repair and he had three lifts in that side and it worked well for him, height wise. I am leaning towards a drive-on lift, either with swing jacks, or I may fabricate a lightweight jacking system to use with the race car (1600 pounds) on a normal drive-on lift that could get the wheel off the lift ramps to remove wheels on the race car. One of my local car cub buddies even has drive-on lift than can be easily moved. I do want a full height lift that I can walk under, too old to want to stoop anymore smiling smiley Now one down side of wooden construction is a typical wooden truss robs height, and I know there new designs on wooden truss that don't that, but a typical metal building truss does maximize height, and you have roof pitch options to play with that even maximize height even more.



Hap Waldrop
Acme Speed Shop
864-370-3000
Website: www.acmespeedshop.com
hapwaldrop@acmespeedshop.com


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BH Davis Avatar
Thompson, CT, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB
Hap,

I can't help on entry height as I have no experience beyond my own personal 7' high garage doors which I wish were 8'.

The nicest car lift I've seen is a drive on with a center frame lift add-on. Drive on and lift the car. Walk under and locate the frame lift components and raise the car off of the drive on platforms. Best of both worlds. Obviously a permanent installation though.

You can sit down with you framing supplier and design a truss system that will work for you. Benefit of a wood truss system vs. steel frame is that you can design in 2nd level storage over part of the building with little extra cost.

BH

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B-racer Avatar
B-racer Jeff Schlemmer
Shakopee, Minnesota, USA   USA
1950 Willys Jeep Pickup "Ratrod"
1971 MG MGB
2014 Dodge Charger
Custom wood trusses don't cost any more than pre-fab these days. You can get the same design either way, and you only lose a few inches and a week or two waiting for them to be made. In fact, the trusses should be the same for either building - at least they are up here where we have to calculate snow load.

You also lose the noise of a steel roof when you use plywood and asphalt shingles. Can you have a 2-story, or even a 1 1/2 story shop? Big enough for some upstairs storage? Maybe even just a loft with pallet racking? My shop is about the size of what you're looking at building, at 36x70. You definitely need full span trusses, so there are no support posts splitting up the space. Mine is an old barn, basically split in 1/3s lengthwise with support posts every 10', and its a huge hassle. If you built a small office in the back enclosed with storage above it, you could have a very comfortable space with great A/C and heat, while the rest will vary more in temp, but be acceptable.

If your ceiling height is enough to accommodate a 10' shop door, you should have enough clearance to walk under most any vehicle on a 2-post hoist (vaulted trusses), and the ability to lift your truck, even if you upgrade to a 4-door long box. Offset the door to one side, put the hoist diagonally on the other side so you can drive into it easily. Then you have enough length to put a ramp-type hoist in front of your office later so no one can accidentally drive through the shop and try to run you over at your desk. winking smiley Sorry, I just had a friend drive his truck through his garage into his bathroom.

This is my plan if my shop ever burns down or gets blown over in a storm??? But 40x80 sounds better. Just spending a few minutes in my pole shed while its raining, I know it would be very difficult to carry on a phone conversation with all the noise. I have a ramp-style hoist in my pole shed, and I'd rather do brake and suspension work on the ground because the ramps are always in the way. A 2-post would be SO much easier!!!



jeff@advanceddistributors.com

LaVerne Avatar
LaVerne LaVerne Downey
Fruita, Colorado, USA   USA
1954 MG TF "Green Hornet"
1969 MG MGB
Here's my play space.. 30 x 64 with 10 ft side walls. 4/12 pitch and colors so it sorta matches the house. If I had it to do again I would do 12 ft sidewalls and I would change the single garage door to 10 footer instead of a 9'. I'd probably do 10 ft high doors instead of 8' also. The sky lights give plenty of light along with the windows that you don't need to turn any on during the day. I made sure I had plenty of lighting and more than enough power for anything I might want in the future since it has a separate 200 amp service. Again I'm guessing you will want 3 phase power which a different animal.


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LaVerne Avatar
LaVerne LaVerne Downey
Fruita, Colorado, USA   USA
1954 MG TF "Green Hornet"
1969 MG MGB
I finished the working end with some tongue and grove pine my wife had left over from a project and the rest I used the left over sheet metal from the build. It would have been a much better idea to finish all the walls with sheet metal. The last two are my brother inlaws shop. Much taller which I like, but just a single tall door on the end which I don't care for at all as you always have jockey crap around when you bring something in or out. No sky lights and just one window so lights on anytime you are in there is a must.


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Rod H. Avatar
Amity, Oregon, USA   USA
1964 MG MGB
1968 MG MGB GT
Make sure and check on maximum allowed height. Out neighbor was not allowed to build a shop higher than his ranch style house, even though the PO of our house was allowed a taller shop...because our house is a two story. Funny thing is that his shop and mine are closer to each other than either of our houses are to our shops.



I can't understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I'm frightened of the old ones. John Cage

'63 MGB
'68 MGBGT
'80 VW Vanagon Kombi
'09 Mazda 3 with 5 speed manual

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Wray Avatar
Wray Gold Member Wray Lemke
., South Carolina, USA   USA
Jeff has a point about the noise from a metal building's roof. But, they can be very cost effective and built to most any configuration and with good insulation the noise could be mitigated. The eaves in my back shop are 12'4" with a 10' door. With a 4-post lift I can easily put my Jeep Patriot all the way up and walk under it.

B-racer Avatar
B-racer Jeff Schlemmer
Shakopee, Minnesota, USA   USA
1950 Willys Jeep Pickup "Ratrod"
1971 MG MGB
2014 Dodge Charger
Now that spray foam insulation is getting less expensive, I've wondered if its a legitimate way to mitigate noise?



jeff@advanceddistributors.com

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Speedracer Avatar
Speedracer Platinum Member Hap Waldrop
Greenville, SC, USA   USA
1967 MG MGB Racecar "The Biscuit"
Good stuff guys, thank you, and thanks for the pics LeVerne.



Hap Waldrop
Acme Speed Shop
864-370-3000
Website: www.acmespeedshop.com
hapwaldrop@acmespeedshop.com


Member Services:
MG/ Triumph Performance Street/Race Engines - Cylinder Head Porting - Modified SU HS Carbs - DIY Engine Rebuild Kits With Free Tech Advice - Alloy wheels for British Sport Cars,and others
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