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Did you see the price that THIS '65 B went for?

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GMB3 Avatar
GMB3 George Badger
Soquel, CA, USA   USA
1965 Jaguar E-Type Coupe "1QUICK E"
1968 MG MGB "1QUICK B"
Went for $32.5K on 14AUG17.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/-/152636731511?vxp=mtr

I asked if anybody wanted me to take a look at it since I'm in the area and was on the peninsula at that time. No response, so I didn't.

It's a sharp car. Don't know if it's $30K sharp but someone thought so.

Just looked at all the pix. Of course it has low mileage, the speedo is disconnected!



---
GEO

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IMG 23.jpg

Bruce Cunha Avatar
placerville, California, USA   USA
Thanks Tom. I was thinking it was still in CA. Here, you would have to list the actual milage.



Bruce E. Cunha

Aridgerunner Avatar
Aridgerunner Silver Member Bill Bussler
Montoursville, PA, USA   USA
1956 MG MGA 1500 "The A"
1959 Triumph TR3A "The Mistress"
MGB prices are rising and for good reason. They are exceptionally good sports cars that are not overly complicated when compared to so many others, old or new, and particularly new. The early cars, flat dash in particular, seem to be rising faster. Then you have, to copy the Corvette terminology, the mid year cars. Those would be 1968 through 1974.5, chrome bumber cars. And the rubber bumper cars bring up the rear. They too are fun cars and can upgraded performance wise to make them run better in most parts of the world.

Can you make money on these cars? Yes, if you are young, skilled and patient. I bought my 57 MGA in 1968 for $300. I have over the years maintained the car and in 1985 I did a frame off rebuild. I wont call it a restoration because it is not perfect. And then I have kept it in nice condition ever since. If I were to sell it I am certain I could easily double my total investment. Sure, you could do better in the stock market but what fun is that? You can't drive a stock certificate.

B's are wonderful cars and will continue to appreciate long after us old timers are gone. They will not suffer the downturn in price seen in the cars of the 20's and 30's. The reason for this is the B is comfortable on the highway at todays speeds. Very few cars of the 20's and 30's can run like that.

This has been a fun and interesting thread. I now have a tooth ache. And Tom Cole has a fantastic B.

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Midwest.MG Avatar
Midwest.MG Silver Member Tom Cole
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA   USA
Well said Mr. Bussler

In reply to # 3608411 by Aridgerunner MGB prices are rising and for good reason. They are exceptionally good sports cars that are not overly complicated when compared to so many others, old or new, and particularly new. The early cars, flat dash in particular, seem to be rising faster. Then you have, to copy the Corvette terminology, the mid year cars. Those would be 1968 through 1974.5, chrome bumber cars. And the rubber bumper cars bring up the rear. They too are fun cars and can upgraded performance wise to make them run better in most parts of the world.

Can you make money on these cars? Yes, if you are young, skilled and patient. I bought my 57 MGA in 1968 for $300. I have over the years maintained the car and in 1985 I did a frame off rebuild. I wont call it a restoration because it is not perfect. And then I have kept it in nice condition ever since. If I were to sell it I am certain I could easily double my total investment. Sure, you could do better in the stock market but what fun is that? You can't drive a stock certificate.

B's are wonderful cars and will continue to appreciate long after us old timers are gone. They will not suffer the downturn in price seen in the cars of the 20's and 30's. The reason for this is the B is comfortable on the highway at todays speeds. Very few cars of the 20's and 30's can run like that.

This has been a fun and interesting thread. I now have a tooth ache. And Tom Cole has a fantastic B.

GMB3 Avatar
GMB3 George Badger
Soquel, CA, USA   USA
1965 Jaguar E-Type Coupe "1QUICK E"
1968 MG MGB "1QUICK B"
It was sold in Cali. You list what the speedo reports. If you have the other miles, you "could" add those. Unlikely.

In reply to # 3608409 by Bruce Cunha Thanks Tom. I was thinking it was still in CA. Here, you would have to list the actual milage.



---
GEO

nickj Avatar
nickj Gold Member Nick Jenkins
Novato, Marin Co, CA, USA   USA
1970 MG MGB GT
1972 MG MGB
In reply to # 3608411 by Aridgerunner MGB prices are rising and for good reason. They are exceptionally good sports cars that are not overly complicated when compared to so many others, old or new, and particularly new.
No doubt the MGB is a fun car and easy to maintain, but that's always been true and the cars have never been too expensive, so it doesn't seem anything has changed. There'll always be a few people of means for whom cost is no object, but most of them don't seem to be in the MGB market.

OTOH, if you're right, I'm glad I got mine when I did.

Midwest.MG Avatar
Midwest.MG Silver Member Tom Cole
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA   USA
Those people of means don't know what they are missing...

There are many things about the MGB (light steering, respectable handling, roll-up windows, sufficient power to keep up with traffic, ample cockpit space, etc.) that make it an excellent choice for driving. When you combine these features, styling, and the benefits gained through a top-down experience (sun, sounds, smells, fun factor, etc.), this British roadster quickly becomes hard to beat. Can you find these qualities in other classic sports cars from the 60's or 70's? The answer is yes, but at what price? For example, the Porsche 356 Cabriolet provides a comparable driving experience, but in terms of cost, that train left the station a long time ago...now six figures.

Maybe one day they will figure it out.

In reply to # 3608883 by nickj
In reply to # 3608411 by Aridgerunner There'll always be a few people of means for whom cost is no object, but most of them don't seem to be in the MGB market.

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lorwood Avatar
lorwood Ed S
Ridge, New York, USA   USA
1979 MG MGB
Not mine but if you could get it down to around the 14k mark it would seem to be more proportionate to the market.

70 split bumper NY



"He rides 'er low on the hip, on the side he's got "Bound for Glory" in red, white and blue flash paint
He leans on the hood telling racing stories, the kids call him Jimmy the Saint".."And I said, "Hey kid, you think that's oil? Man, that ain't oil, that's blood"
I wonder what he was thinking when he hit that storm, or was he just lost in the flood?"

Midwest.MG Avatar
Midwest.MG Silver Member Tom Cole
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA   USA
That is a very special, collectible, preserved MGB. I have been following it over the past month, and if I were not committed to the period between '65-'67, I would have bought it.

Attached is the current market valuation for a 1965 from Hagerty



In reply to # 3609166 by lorwood Not mine but if you could get it down to around the 14k mark it would seem to be more proportionate to the market.

70 split bumper NY

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1965 MGB - Hagerty 10-13-2017.jpg    34.7 KB
1965 MGB - Hagerty 10-13-2017.jpg

lorwood Avatar
lorwood Ed S
Ridge, New York, USA   USA
1979 MG MGB
All I can say is the Haggerty does not accurately project current car values just like Mecum, Barrett Jackson etc. do not represent the true market value of a car. It's not in their best interest to do so. Haggerty wants to sell insurance, they want higher value cars to sell higher premiums. The auctions don't make money selling cars they make money on sellers and buyers paying them a commission to show the car. The higher the price the higher their commission. It's just like Kelly Blue book and NADA both of whom do not represent what you should pay for or be paid for at a dealership.

Believe it or not Ebay and Craigslist are a better barometer of the current market. It's the same as anything, what are the costs of goods at the street level, that's the market.

This hobby has always been the same. There are the few who never get their hands dirty and trot cars around on trailers drinking champagne while wearing an ascot while they stand in front of a car on some manicured lawn. They probably can barely drive. Then their are the majority of us who buy, sell, trade and wrench in the garage. We are the true market.

If you understand and accept this you will never overpay.

As I always say the car hobby is no place for investment.



"He rides 'er low on the hip, on the side he's got "Bound for Glory" in red, white and blue flash paint
He leans on the hood telling racing stories, the kids call him Jimmy the Saint".."And I said, "Hey kid, you think that's oil? Man, that ain't oil, that's blood"
I wonder what he was thinking when he hit that storm, or was he just lost in the flood?"

67motorcat Avatar
67motorcat Silver Member Steve O
Pinehurst, North Carolina, USA   USA
1967 MG MGB
Great buy Tom!

Very few cars out there of that caliber , a rare find indeed and certainly worth every penny.

Nice to know Hagerty and others will insure it for the agreed value you choose protecting your investment.

There are always exceptional cars that stand out from the rest, this inspires and keeps the whole Hobby Car industry alive and healthy.

thumbs upthumbs upthumbs up

Midwest.MG Avatar
Midwest.MG Silver Member Tom Cole
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA   USA
Interesting background on how Hagerty values are determined...

In reply to a post by from Hagerty "Hagerty Valuation Tools® use vehicle values from our own independently published Hagerty Price Guide, and these values are among the most accurate in the collector car world thanks to two major factors: our data and our expertise.

Hagerty Price Guide works tirelessly to ensure that all facets of the collector car marketplace are considered when we evaluate a vehicle’s value. We understand that public auctions are a relatively small percentage of collector car transactions (less than 20%, in fact), but that the visible nature of the venue provides a great opportunity to learn about vehicle values. Because of this we take great efforts to review both small- and large-scale activity in this channel around the world. We perform our own on-site vehicle inspections to provide us as detailed an understanding as possible of every car that crosses the block, and we consult respected third parties to fill in the details on those cars we are unable to review.

We also understand that dealer sales represent an even smaller volume of transactions (approximately 12%), but that those transactions are typically very well informed. A good dealer can describe a vehicle’s specification down to a car’s tire size, and that is why we go to great lengths to receive sales figures directly from established dealers who trade solely in collectible automobiles. In addition, we talk to scores more dealers on a regular basis to learn both micro- and macro-level opinions about the state of the market.

Most importantly, Hagerty knows that peer-to-peer sales – those exchanges that are conducted outside of the public eye and away from scrutiny – have historically been elusive. As these sales rarely make headlines but constitute the overwhelming majority of the collector car marketplace (71.5%, to be exact), we have developed a process to aggregate transactional data from our vast network of willing insured clients. We actively solicit and record details regarding tens of thousands of these transactions annually.

In addition to these transactional inputs, we actively monitor asking prices. Hagerty also has access to the insured values of hundreds of thousands of vehicles. Our data aggregation is a continuous process, and the careful study and research allows us to publish three times per year (January, May, and September).
In the collector car world, our data is possibly the most well-rounded of any organization.

Access to data is only part of the story, however. It is Hagerty Price Guide’s familiarity with the industry and close association to the market itself that translates raw data to meaningful insight.

The classic car marketplace behaves differently than the new or used car market does. In particular, classic cars are an emotional purchase and their buyers scrutinize their details to a much greater extent. There can also be a tremendous variance between cars of the same year/make/model description. As such, it is imperative that all of a vehicle’s details are understood before interpreting a sale price’s comment on the market. Low mileage, full documentation, overall condition, rarity, and significant modifications can all greatly affect a vehicle’s value – more so than with a three-year-old car.

At Hagerty Price Guide, we don’t just look at a given model’s transactional price and volume. We note condition, history, optional equipment, quality of restoration, degree of documentation, and sales venue, just to name a few.

The values Hagerty Price Guide publishes are not programmatically computed, but rather they are filtered through our experts’ collective experience. Instead of relying on an algorithm to interpret all of the data we have compiled, our analysts go to great lengths to understand the individual reasons that a car sold for the amount it did.

In addition to looking at recent sales data for a given model, we also overlay other market factors to provide a more grounded vantage of the vehicle values we publish. Inventory, demand, recent trends of similar vehicles, movement within related market segments, and general directions of the car market overall all influence a car’s published value. We also evaluate changing tastes among buyers and developing fads within the hobby, and we relate these inputs to larger economic factors outside of the car hobby, like home equity crunches, employment statistics, and fuel prices.

Through this effort, you can be assured that the prices we report are fully considered, exhaustively researched, and – most importantly – accurate."

In reply to # 3609213 by lorwood All I can say is the Haggerty does not accurately project current car values just like Mecum, Barrett Jackson etc. do not represent the true market value of a car. It's not in their best interest to do so. Haggerty wants to sell insurance, they want higher value cars to sell higher premiums. The auctions don't make money selling cars they make money on sellers and buyers paying them a commission to show the car. The higher the price the higher their commission. It's just like Kelly Blue book and NADA both of whom do not represent what you should pay for or be paid for at a dealership.

Believe it or not Ebay and Craigslist are a better barometer of the current market. It's the same as anything, what are the costs of goods at the street level, that's the market.

This hobby has always been the same. There are the few who never get their hands dirty and trot cars around on trailers drinking champagne while wearing an ascot while they stand in front of a car on some manicured lawn. They probably can barely drive. Then their are the majority of us who buy, sell, trade and wrench in the garage. We are the true market.

If you understand and accept this you will never overpay.

As I always say the car hobby is no place for investment.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-10-13 02:09 PM by Midwest.MG.

Midwest.MG Avatar
Midwest.MG Silver Member Tom Cole
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA   USA
.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-10-13 07:32 PM by Midwest.MG.

mgbanthony Avatar
mgbanthony Platinum Member Anthony Henderson
Gananoque, Ontario, Canada   CAN
1962 MG MGB
1962 MG MGB
1970 MG MGB GT
1974 MG MGB    & more
How would everybody feel about a $60K MGB?? Better take your blood thinners...

Midwest.MG Avatar
Midwest.MG Silver Member Tom Cole
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA   USA
I think it would be extremely rare, but entirely possible for the right buyer and car. When I was in the market, I learned of one recently selling through a dealer for $70k. Hard to believe, but a true story.

In reply to # 3609336 by mgbanthony How would everybody feel about a $60K MGB?? Better take your blood thinners...

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