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Opinions on Water Wetter

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Swamperca Avatar
Swamperca Swamper CA
-, Nor Cal, USA   USA
1968 MG MGC GT "California Chrome"
1969 MG MGB GT "Rat"
1969 MG MGC GT "C-Rod"
1970 MG MGB GT "Widow"    & more
Another opinionated tread, someone has to do it Rob. Water Wetter, good, bad or a waste of money.

I'm heading down through 110 plus temps to San Diego along with a few others. Last year driving through Provo Utah I was in 106 and everything went well however made me very nervous. Just trying to get the best advantage possible to keep the engine temps as cool as possible. Figure it can't be a disadvantage.

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dipstick Avatar
dipstick Kenny Snyder
La Center, Washington, USA   USA
1941 Ford N-Series
1958 MG MGA 1500 Coupe "Rosie"
1970 MG MGB GT "Pat's GT"
1971 MG MGB "Gifted To Me"    & more
I have used Water Wetter in the street and racecar. The only disadvantage is that it turns the coolant a rust color. In my experience no advantages.



Be safe out there.
Kenny

Basil Adams Avatar
About 12 miles from Sears Point, CA, USA   USA
It seems to be a good lubricant for the water pump.



Basil C. Adams
1956 MGA Coupe (Show Car)
1957 MGA Roadster (Driver)
1958 MGA Coupe (Racecar)
1959 MGA Coupe (unrestored)
1960 MGA Coupe (unrestored)
1960 MGA Roadster (Driver)
MKIII Elva Courier (E1056)
1967 427 Cobra
1972 Alfa Romeo Montreal
A coupla late MGBs
1960 Austin Healy BN7
More Cars than Brains

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Shepptvr Avatar
Shepptvr Paul Sheppard
Shifnal, Shropshire, UK   GBR
I would not bother

tvrgeek Avatar
tvrgeek Silver Member Scott S
Bowie, Maryland, USA   USA
1965 MG MGB
1974 MG MGB GT
In my experience;
It does improve cooling slightly, and I guess it does lube the pump and prevent rust.
Its big advantage is it is not as slippery when puked on a race track as much as anti-freeze, so it is a safety factor for racing.

Now, the margin over water, or even 50/50, is small enough it is no miracle cure for an inadequacy in the cooling system from what I could tell.

I have tried it in two cars whose system as shipped factory fresh was insufficient (2500M and +4). In neither case was it more than marginal. Both had too small rads and both being TR engines, had a water pump that was more an aerator than a pump. Modifications to the pump snail and impeller, a tad more idle advance, baffling and fans, and custom rads is what allowed them to sit in stop and go 100 degree traffic. They were both fine if moving. MG pumps are a little better.

106 is still OK, but I would be nervous too. I might be inclined to do a chemical flush, make sure all the seals and baffles are in place, timing correct etc. Put in a expansion/recovery if you don't have one so you know your system has only water in it. My 65 would get hot when sitting in city stop and go. I added the shroud and it takes care of that, but it may block some highway flow. You may also double check your temp gauge with an IR spot gauge. 5 degrees either way is either great or cause for concern. Some thermostats flow better than others. I might be inclined to have a spare or maybe a blocking ring in my kit.

Can't hurt. There is also that supposed magic really expensive non-water cooling fluid out there. I know nothing about it.

PS:
I don't remember it being rust color, just pink. It has been a while. My experience, an advertising, no folklore. Others may have different experience.



Cogito ergo sum periculoso

Donthuis Avatar
Donthuis Don van Riet
Rijswijk, ZH, Netherlands   NLD
Very expensive so I did not even try it. It is supposed to help reduce surface tension in water, so that airbubbles are less likely to appear. The claim is this effect raises the overall cooling effect and prevents hotspots.

I have some basic questions though:
1) if one uses a 50/50 antifreeze water mixture is it 50% effective or not needed at all by the action of the glycol?
2) bubbles appear at very high temps, but having a well pressurised cooling system, i.c. on 15psi, this moves to above 115C
Moreover the antifreeze being added also raises the temp, I wonder what the combination results into
3) protecting against rust and protecting your waterpump benefits from other, much cheaper additives, so why bother with WW?

BTW This year is one of the hottest in June in the South of France where I am staying now. Ambient temps rise to 40+C levels and even with my large 13 " Kenlowe pusherfan my temp gauge moves halfway between N and H. Activating another , smaller puller fan of 9" at halfpower helps when standing still in traffic jams, but does not change the final level on the gauge. Switching this smaller one to full power is my last resort before putting the heater on with the blower on my Tourer windscreen and away.

Many years ago, with just the mechanical fan in, traffic jams required using the heater to prevent overheating. Adding a smaller Kenlowe pusher was enough to prevent overheating too. Those were the years I changed to pure water with antirust additive every summer, a cheap solution for highest cooling efficiency. So many options exist to do without waterwetter...

tvrgeek Avatar
tvrgeek Silver Member Scott S
Bowie, Maryland, USA   USA
1965 MG MGB
1974 MG MGB GT
As per their instructions, WW is to be used with water, not with anti-freeze.



Cogito ergo sum periculoso

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lgorg Avatar
lgorg Larry Gorg
Renton, WA, USA   USA
1967 MG MGB "Robbie"
Have not used Water Wetter, but when my B overheated last year in hot weather in traffic, I simply drained the 50/50 coolant. I replaced it with 25% antifreeze and 75% distilled water from the grocery store. I've noticed after that, my temp, according to the gauge, is about 5 degrees cooler. it runs about 175 degrees according to the gauge and my hand held IR device. It only goes up if I sit too long in traffic.

pinkyponk Avatar
pinkyponk Gold Member Adrian Page
Berwick, Nova Scotia, Canada   CAN
No idea if this is legit or not but I think I would do a little research before putting Redline water wetter in my car. https://rennlist.com/forums/general-porsche-discussions-forum/680070-redline-water-wetter-users-just-a-heads-up.html They talk of the brown sludge.

We used to use a type of water wetter to clean greasy engines. It was something the fire department gave my boss. They dumped it in tankers so the water they sprayed on fires didn't bead and run off certain surfaces. Similar to soap... a surfactant.

Adrian



Home built Eaton M62 Supercharger with 9psi boost, "stock" high ratio rocker arms, 8:1 compression, Piper 270 cam, ported head, matched manifolds, CB Performance computerized ignition.

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Gerry Avatar
Gerry Gold Member Gerry Masterman
Prairieville, Louisiana, USA   USA
Years back I used WW in a new engine for a short time. I found that with WW and water I had reduced coolant temps as compared to 50/50 mix of glycol and water. I was not able to document this simply because conditions were not in a controlled environment. I also saw about the same decrease in temps using just water BUT the plain water rusted up very quickly-in a matter of hours. I did not see any clouding with the WW/water mix but I ran it for less than a month before going back to standard glycol mix. WW worth the expense? I have no idea but I have an abundance in premix coolant so will likely never try it again

NovasTaylor Avatar
NovasTaylor Tim Williams
Raleigh, NC, USA   USA
An experienced LBC mechanic whom I trust told me "don't waste your money, Tim." So I found other stuff to waste it on.

T



Tim W.
80 MGB LE "ZOM B"
73 MGB GT "Royale with Cheese"
71 Triumph TR6 "TRawler"
"Modern cars - they all look like electric shavers." - Marv (Sin City)

V8MGBV8 Avatar
V8MGBV8 Carl Floyd
Kinggsport, TN, USA   USA
In reply to # 3535239 by lgorg I simply drained the 50/50 coolant. I replaced it with 25% antifreeze and 75% distilled water from the grocery store.

Best solution for the hottest part of driving season. thumbs up

tvrgeek Avatar
tvrgeek Silver Member Scott S
Bowie, Maryland, USA   USA
1965 MG MGB
1974 MG MGB GT
This makes sense, if your system is cruddy, it may clean it out but sludgy water is probably a very bad heat transport. After cleanout, it may work a lot better anyway! I wonder how many of our cars never has at least one fill with water or used tap water over their life and could use a good flush.

If only summer for a hot trip, I think I might put in a blanking sleeve just for the trip.


In reply to # 3535332 by pinkyponk No idea if this is legit or not but I think I would do a little research before putting Redline water wetter in my car. https://rennlist.com/forums/general-porsche-discussions-forum/680070-redline-water-wetter-users-just-a-heads-up.html They talk of the brown sludge.

We used to use a type of water wetter to clean greasy engines. It was something the fire department gave my boss. They dumped it in tankers so the water they sprayed on fires didn't bead and run off certain surfaces. Similar to soap... a surfactant.

Adrian



Cogito ergo sum periculoso

Donthuis Avatar
Donthuis Don van Riet
Rijswijk, ZH, Netherlands   NLD
So we are paying for a nonfoaming detergent which forces us to use better cooling plain water devil smiley

Although I can confirm plain water has better heat transfer and caloric value than other coolants, it would be strange to pay a lot for just getting the antifreeze out. Detergents are quite cheap and getting the foam out must not be that expensive eye rolling smiley

I remember using water + Holts antirust for just 10 guilders (€4,50) at the time each and every summer.....


In reply to # 3534608 by tvrgeek As per their instructions, WW is to be used with water, not with anti-freeze.

dipstick Avatar
dipstick Kenny Snyder
La Center, Washington, USA   USA
1941 Ford N-Series
1958 MG MGA 1500 Coupe "Rosie"
1970 MG MGB GT "Pat's GT"
1971 MG MGB "Gifted To Me"    & more
In the shop all empty inline cast four and six cylinder blocks were set on their pan rails, and from the head gasket surface holes 3/16" sharp stainless steel welding rods were pounded into the bottom of the water jacket which broke up the deep accumulations of rust and sediment which powder and particulate poured out afterwards. In bad cases the blocks were filled with white vinegar and sat for a couple of days, and then they were soaked in the hot caustic soda hot-tank before internal pressure washing.

Simply flushing with water and coolant system cleaner is not going to clean the residue out of an engine block.



Be safe out there.
Kenny

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