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Oil filter question...

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Jenglan Gold Member Jeff England
Puyallup, Washington, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB "Green Hornet"
Just about to get my '77 roadster up and running after 6 years sitting idle. I had a quick question about oil filters: I keep reading folks way smarter than me talk about short and tall oil filters. The PO put a short Fram filter, mounted upside down on my car. Is there an issue with this setup? If so, what is the issue? Thanks

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course2kid Jeffrey Johnson
Fountain Valley, CA, USA   USA
1979 MG MGB "Lucy (Lucifer)"
Apparently, some short body filters will go on, but the center "spindle" of the car is too long for the short filter and you wind up with no oil flow.

Jenglan Gold Member Jeff England
Puyallup, Washington, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB "Green Hornet"
Is there an easily obtainable (local autoparts store) tall/long filter anyone can recommend?

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dickmoritz Avatar
dickmoritz Gold Member Dick Moritz
Philly 'burbs, PA, USA   USA
Purolator PL20195... winking smiley

Dick



Errabundi Saepe, Semper Certi
(Often wrong, but always certain)

Aridgerunner Avatar
Aridgerunner Silver Member Bill Bussler
Montoursville, PA, USA   USA
1956 MG MGA 1500 "The A"
1959 Triumph TR3A "The Mistress"
Purolator PL20195. Most places like Advance Auto ond Orilies carry it. Don't let em talk you into something else.

course2kid Jeffrey Johnson
Fountain Valley, CA, USA   USA
1979 MG MGB "Lucy (Lucifer)"
Here's a library article on filters that fit:

http://www.mgexp.com/article/filters.html

kayakjeepme Avatar
kayakjeepme Gold Member Wayne Tenneson
Hopewell, NJ, USA   USA
1979 MG MGB "St. Patrick"
1979 MG MGB "Lady Godiva"
2013 Jeep Wrangler
PL20195 2 pack on Amazon : $ 15.50

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Markp61 Avatar
Markp61 Silver Member Mark Pasquill
MARION, MA, USA   USA
X2. I read one of Dicks post and his firm belief in the PL20195. I had a short K and N originally. I recently fitted the PL and I do see an increase in idle oil pressure. Now I know more about my car, I now get the virtues of the tall filter and why it's better.
In reply to # 3514363 by dickmoritz Purolator PL20195... winking smiley

Dick

spikemichael Avatar
spikemichael Michael Caputo
Ocean Shores, WA, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB "Freebie"
1973 MG MGB
1974 MG MGB "Spike"
1979 MG MGB "MegaBeanie"    & more
PL20195
L20195

Both by Purolator, one is gold one is white.



Michael J. Caputo
'79 RBB and '73 CBB owner with extensive experience in 12v Audio System design and installation.
Vendor of Regalia and Promotional Products. Forum Member with a warped sense of humor.

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dickmoritz Avatar
dickmoritz Gold Member Dick Moritz
Philly 'burbs, PA, USA   USA
Actually the gold and white oil filters have been discontinued by Purolator. The white filters were the regular quality filters which Purolator called their Classic filters. A fine filter. The gold filter was the premium PureOne filter, an even better filter. And they also offered the Purolator Synthetic, primarily for use with synthetic oils (which should never be used in MG's, IMO...) Fine to use any of these three filters if they're still in stores.

The branding was recently changed by Purolator. The Classic is now red and referred to simply as "Purolator." The gold PureOne has been superseded by the blue Purolator One. And the top-of-the-line Synthetic filter has now been replaced by the black filter known as the Boss.

More info here: http://www.pureoil.com/en/do-it-yourself/oil-filters/oil-filter-selection-guide/

All of the older and newer filters are just fine to use on MGBs with the inverted spin-on filter configuration...



Dick, who handled the technical writing for Purolator for ten years...



In reply to # 3514469 by spikemichael PL20195
L20195

Both by Purolator, one is gold one is white.



Errabundi Saepe, Semper Certi
(Often wrong, but always certain)

riley1489 Avatar
riley1489 Gold Member Bruce H
Great White North, QC, Canada   CAN
1953 Jaguar XK120
1959 Riley 1.5 "King George"
1973 MG MGB
Yikes,

the saga of oil filters continues .......................... devil smiley

B



Check your ego Amigo!

Jenglan Gold Member Jeff England
Puyallup, Washington, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB "Green Hornet"
Thanks to all for the great advice! I appreciate it. Jeff

MGB-GT V8 Olds Avatar
MGB-GT V8 Olds Howard Fitzcharles III
Smyrna, TN, USA   USA
1970 MG MGB GT V8 "The Green Dragon"
1970 MG MGB V8 Conversion "The Green Dragon"
Even though the inverted filter is easier to change, it is destructive to the engine. Have you not heard the knocks in the engine when starting? Many BLM decisions were not in your best interest. The area above the tube is empty of oil when it sits and that oil drains back into the pan. So each time you restart, the oil pump has to refill that empty space BEFORE any oil pressure is able to push oil to your bearings. Thus "Knock, Knock, Knock" on your bearings until that empty space is full. Not only no oil pressure to the bearings but no oil tossed on the cylinder walls either and if you think there is oil left there from when it ran last time you are wrong. The guy that said a short filter can be too close to the end of the tube is correct and if too close it will restrict oil flow all the time. An ideal size for the inverted filter is one that has about 3/4 inch clearance from the end of the tube to any obstacle in the filter, thus less engine running with no oil to the bearings or pistons and rings until that empty space is full. A better option is to go back to the bottom feed filter system and tell BLM where to stuff their top feed filter system.

Rod H. Avatar
Amity, Oregon, USA   USA
1964 MG MGB
1968 MG MGB GT
In reply to # 3514622 by MGB-GT V8 Olds Even though the inverted filter is easier to change, it is destructive to the engine. Have you not heard the knocks in the engine when starting? Many BLM decisions were not in your best interest. The area above the tube is empty of oil when it sits and that oil drains back into the pan. So each time you restart, the oil pump has to refill that empty space BEFORE any oil pressure is able to push oil to your bearings. Thus "Knock, Knock, Knock" on your bearings until that empty space is full. Not only no oil pressure to the bearings but no oil tossed on the cylinder walls either and if you think there is oil left there from when it ran last time you are wrong. The guy that said a short filter can be too close to the end of the tube is correct and if too close it will restrict oil flow all the time. An ideal size for the inverted filter is one that has about 3/4 inch clearance from the end of the tube to any obstacle in the filter, thus less engine running with no oil to the bearings or pistons and rings until that empty space is full. A better option is to go back to the bottom feed filter system and tell BLM where to stuff their top feed filter system.

On what do you base the 3/4" being ideal?



I can't understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I'm frightened of the old ones. John Cage

'63 MGB
'68 MGBGT
'80 VW Vanagon Kombi
'09 Mazda 3 with 5 speed manual

dickmoritz Avatar
dickmoritz Gold Member Dick Moritz
Philly 'burbs, PA, USA   USA
Certainly not. Quality oil filters incorporate an anti-drainback valve that maintains a level of oil in the filter to the top of the stand pipe. The oil pump in B series engines is a positive displacement gerotor design, geared to spin quite quickly, even when cranking. There is residual oil between the engine bearings and the crankshaft (and camshaft) journals that provides initial lubrication on startup. But, more importantly, in the several revolutions of the engine that are typical when cranking an engine to get it to start, the oil pump has largely filled the oil galleries in the engine, including the passages leading to and through the drillings in the crankshaft.

While there may be an instant when the engine first starts when full flow may not have reached the bearings, this will be instantaneous and will do no harm. I and many other racers use the inverted filter design with no negative consequences...

Dick


In reply to # 3514622 by MGB-GT V8 Olds Even though the inverted filter is easier to change, it is destructive to the engine. Have you not heard the knocks in the engine when starting? Many BLM decisions were not in your best interest. The area above the tube is empty of oil when it sits and that oil drains back into the pan. So each time you restart, the oil pump has to refill that empty space BEFORE any oil pressure is able to push oil to your bearings. Thus "Knock, Knock, Knock" on your bearings until that empty space is full. Not only no oil pressure to the bearings but no oil tossed on the cylinder walls either and if you think there is oil left there from when it ran last time you are wrong. The guy that said a short filter can be too close to the end of the tube is correct and if too close it will restrict oil flow all the time. An ideal size for the inverted filter is one that has about 3/4 inch clearance from the end of the tube to any obstacle in the filter, thus less engine running with no oil to the bearings or pistons and rings until that empty space is full. A better option is to go back to the bottom feed filter system and tell BLM where to stuff their top feed filter system.



Errabundi Saepe, Semper Certi
(Often wrong, but always certain)

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