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MGB Snugtop Hardtop Fiberglass Repair Help

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BumbleB74 Avatar
BumbleB74 William Milholen
Tidewater, Tidewater VA, USA   USA
I have one of these tops, but wonder if there is any hollow space behind the broken part? Wondering if they bonded an outer skin to an inner skin, possibly with a void between?

Did they bond in a small metal plate that the screws mount in? Or did they just go into the fiberglass.

Watch some videos for sure, and practice laying up some fiberglass on a scrap or two of wood. It isn't difficult, but the main thing is to mix the resin with the right amount of hardener, and stir it in well. You don't want it to go off too quickly!

You also need to trim the fiberglass to be a decent fit, and you'll probably end up putting in several plies rotate 45 degree from each other for best strength in the weave.

You want some fairly rough areas for the new resin to bond to, and you'll use some throw away $1 paint brushes to brush it into all the nooks and crannies



1974-1/2 Roadster, "Bumble Bee", Corvette Yellow - in shambles, wire wheels
1976 Roadster, "Virus", Sandglow - "driver" condition (stock + 32/36 Weber DGEV, cast iron header, 25D distributor), bolt on wheels, ON the road!

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GMB3 Avatar
GMB3 George Badger
Soquel, CA, USA   USA
1965 Jaguar E-Type Coupe "1QUICK E"
1968 MG MGB "1QUICK B"
Still no idea. I don't have cable, sat or inet TV. I watch the tube maybe 1 hour/day for the evening news. I just don't have time to watch.

Someone famous once uttered, "Theater is life, cinema is art and television is furniture."

In reply to # 3514042 by Marc2
In reply to # 3514022 by GMB3 I have no idea who Foose is

http://www.chipfoose.com/ws_display.asp?filter=OVERHAULIN%27_Landing



---
GEO

Marc2 Avatar
Marc2 Gold Member Mark Hoefle
Richardson, TX, USA   USA
1972 MG MGB "Green Machine"
In reply to # 3514088 by GMB3 Still no idea. I don't have cable, sat or inet TV. I watch the tube maybe 1 hour/day for the evening news. I just don't have time to watch.

Someone famous once uttered, "Theater is life, cinema is art and television is furniture."

In reply to # 3514042 by Marc2
In reply to # 3514022 by GMB3 I have no idea who Foose is

http://www.chipfoose.com/ws_display.asp?filter=OVERHAULIN%27_Landing

Like the quote grinning smiley

Chip Foose is a fairly well known Automotive and Automotive Product Designer out of Huntington Beach in Hot Rod and Custom Car circles - youngest inductee in the Hot Rod Hall of Fame. He has built several award-winning (SEMA, Ridler, AMBER) custom cars, and is also known for the "Foose" wheels he designs.
http://www.foosedesignwheels.com/

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ohlord Avatar
ohlord Gold Member Rob C
North of Seattle, N.W., USA   USA
1957 Land Rover Series I "EYEYIYI"
1971 MG MGB
1971 MG MGB "Bedouin 2"
I know the construction and can say for 200 bucks you got screwed.
200 buys like new in a snugtop
It's going to cost nearly that to do a decent job reinforcing the stressed area so the latch under considerable load won't rip out.



"I'm a long way gone down this wild road I'm on
It's gonna take me where I'm bound
It's a long way around"



"These are the days that must happen to you"

RD2 Radar/ Electronic Warfare Technician
Vietnam 1969-1972


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spikerj Avatar
spikerj Josh Spiker
Provo, UT, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB MkIII "Little Red"
In reply to # 3513912 by Marc2 This comes with the materials you would need to do the repair yourself, along with a pretty good guide.

https://www.westmarine.com/buy/west-system--105-k-fiberglass-boat-repair-kit--12954095

http://newcontent.westmarine.com/documents/pdfs/OwnersManuals/MAINTENANCE/12954095_105-K%20Fiberglass%20Kit%20Instruction.pdf

Also, a good alternate to using an (expensive) fiberglass pro at a Corvette body shop, is local boat shops - they do fiberglass repairs all the time.

Thanks for the links Mark.

spikerj Avatar
spikerj Josh Spiker
Provo, UT, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB MkIII "Little Red"
In reply to # 3514046 by BumbleB74 I have one of these tops, but wonder if there is any hollow space behind the broken part? Wondering if they bonded an outer skin to an inner skin, possibly with a void between?

Did they bond in a small metal plate that the screws mount in? Or did they just go into the fiberglass.

Watch some videos for sure, and practice laying up some fiberglass on a scrap or two of wood. It isn't difficult, but the main thing is to mix the resin with the right amount of hardener, and stir it in well. You don't want it to go off too quickly!

You also need to trim the fiberglass to be a decent fit, and you'll probably end up putting in several plies rotate 45 degree from each other for best strength in the weave.

You want some fairly rough areas for the new resin to bond to, and you'll use some throw away $1 paint brushes to brush it into all the nooks and crannies

Ya there actually is just a hollow space in between the outer and inner skin.

I'm not sure yet whether the bracket is screwed into a metal plate or the fiberglass directly, but when I take a closer look and take the bracket off I'll let you know what I find.

I'll definitely make sure to watch some videos and practice working with the fiberglass before I do the repair.

spikerj Avatar
spikerj Josh Spiker
Provo, UT, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB MkIII "Little Red"
In reply to # 3514181 by ohlord I know the construction and can say for 200 bucks you got screwed.
200 buys like new in a snugtop
It's going to cost nearly that to do a decent job reinforcing the stressed area so the latch under considerable load won't rip out.

Like I said, I knew I was paying a little much for it when I bought it, but I'm not complaining about it because it will only cost about $30 to do the repair myself. I also have a friend who is experienced with working with fiberglass that will be helping me out.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-05-19 12:50 AM by spikerj.

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perfectpitch Avatar
perfectpitch Charles Windsor (Disabled)
Disabled Account, Antarctica   ATA
In reply to # 3514181 by ohlord I know the construction and can say for 200 bucks you got screwed.
200 buys like new in a snugtop
It's going to cost nearly that to do a decent job reinforcing the stressed area so the latch under considerable load won't rip out.

Robbie is quite the expert on being screwed.

dcraddock43 Gold Member Dave Craddock
Redford (Detroit), Mi., USA   USA
Well then you richly deserve paying four or five times what it should cost !...... LOL


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Preform Resources,Inc./Dave Craddock, MGB composite parts, body kits ,front and rear valances, stock and RV-8 bolt on hoods ,many spridget parts as well. composite parts that FIT! 313-533-2457 http://preformresources.com/ preres@sbcglobal.net
BumbleB74 Avatar
BumbleB74 William Milholen
Tidewater, Tidewater VA, USA   USA
fella made a not so great choice by our standards, but he SHOULD be able to recover. We've all been there at one point or another.

Just glad to see somebody with some youth in them interested in our beloved B!



1974-1/2 Roadster, "Bumble Bee", Corvette Yellow - in shambles, wire wheels
1976 Roadster, "Virus", Sandglow - "driver" condition (stock + 32/36 Weber DGEV, cast iron header, 25D distributor), bolt on wheels, ON the road!

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PetesMG S P
Worc., MA, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB
In reply to # 3514450 by spikerj
Ya there actually is just a hollow space in between the outer and inner skin.

I'm not sure yet whether the bracket is screwed into a metal plate or the fiberglass directly, but when I take a closer look and take the bracket off I'll let you know what I find.

I'll definitely make sure to watch some videos and practice working with the fiberglass before I do the repair.



Let's not be too hard on the guy. Sometimes you get what you get when you buy something. Many times I've said "that doesn't look too bad - I can work with that - hey, it'll give me something to work with anyway - how hard could it be - I think that would work" etc, etc. I've bought plenty of swap-meet purchases that didn't turn out as I hoped.

Now, back to the subject of the repair!

If the back side is open, this gives you an opportunity to reinforce the patch with a piece of steel/wood/aluminum !! Get a piece of "something" that is wider than your broken part by a good 3-4" per side. Take the screws out of the clamp that go into the broken section of fiberglass. Dill that hole pattern into your new "inner brace", in the center. Slide the brace up into the vacant space in the top, spanning the broken opening. Then when you put the broken piece and clamp on, screw through the clamp, through the broken piece, and into your new inner brace. In this way you can help spread out the load of the clamp onto the good surrounding fiberglass past the fracture. Once you've glassed over the opening nobody will even know it's there, and you'll have a lot more added strength for your repair. You could epoxy the brace in place if it helps.

You'll need to look at the broken piece and the curvature of the top to see if this is even possible. Maybe a piece of 1/4" stock, 2-3" wide, about a foot long, bent to the curvature required, fished up inside the top, with the clamp and broken piece screwed to it, then glassed over.... If you could do that it sure would help compliment the fiberglass repair.

Good luck
Pete



'77 new-to-me MGB
'70 XKE FHC,
'79 MGB (previous),
'74.5 MGB GT (previous),
'30 Model A hotrod,
Jeeps, Suburban, ...too much stuff.

spikerj Avatar
spikerj Josh Spiker
Provo, UT, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB MkIII "Little Red"
In reply to # 3514687 by PetesMG
In reply to # 3514450 by spikerj
Ya there actually is just a hollow space in between the outer and inner skin.

I'm not sure yet whether the bracket is screwed into a metal plate or the fiberglass directly, but when I take a closer look and take the bracket off I'll let you know what I find.

I'll definitely make sure to watch some videos and practice working with the fiberglass before I do the repair.



Let's not be too hard on the guy. Sometimes you get what you get when you buy something. Many times I've said "that doesn't look too bad - I can work with that - hey, it'll give me something to work with anyway - how hard could it be - I think that would work" etc, etc. I've bought plenty of swap-meet purchases that didn't turn out as I hoped.

Now, back to the subject of the repair!

If the back side is open, this gives you an opportunity to reinforce the patch with a piece of steel/wood/aluminum !! Get a piece of "something" that is wider than your broken part by a good 3-4" per side. Take the screws out of the clamp that go into the broken section of fiberglass. Dill that hole pattern into your new "inner brace", in the center. Slide the brace up into the vacant space in the top, spanning the broken opening. Then when you put the broken piece and clamp on, screw through the clamp, through the broken piece, and into your new inner brace. In this way you can help spread out the load of the clamp onto the good surrounding fiberglass past the fracture. Once you've glassed over the opening nobody will even know it's there, and you'll have a lot more added strength for your repair. You could epoxy the brace in place if it helps.

You'll need to look at the broken piece and the curvature of the top to see if this is even possible. Maybe a piece of 1/4" stock, 2-3" wide, about a foot long, bent to the curvature required, fished up inside the top, with the clamp and broken piece screwed to it, then glassed over.... If you could do that it sure would help compliment the fiberglass repair.

Good luck
Pete

Good idea Pete! I think that is the route I am going to go with. I'll probably be doing the repair sometime this week, so I'll let you guys know how it goes!

BH Davis Avatar
Thompson, CT, USA   USA
1973 MG MGB
There have been a number of comments about the "amount of force on that bracket." I want to point out though that the bulk of the force in holding down a Snugtop is on the two primary brackets behind the seats. When you pull the Snugtop down into place with the 1/4" hex bolts on those main brackets it pulls both the rear and front of the top down to the car. I've found that all the two front clips really do is seal against water penetration at the windshield head rail when driving in the rain. It is possible that without the front brackets clipped you could have a lifting problem at high speed but I don't know if that would really be a problem.

If there were significant pressure on those front clips there would have been made with a more substantial rear mounting plate embedded in the top. As such I'd say that the failure was caused by over tightening the clips and any repair you make if carefully done should be adequate.

BH

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