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Clutch master cylinder removal

Posted by mheitt 
mheitt Avatar
michael heitt
Baltimore, USA   usa
1967 Jeep Commander "Jeepster Commando"
1976 MG MGB

How the heck do you remove the bottom bolt on the clutch master cylinder? I just can't figure it out.

m
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mk2sprite Avatar
Michael Knaub
New York, USA   usa

M. Go from under the dash, remove the oblong rubber plug in the firewall and go thru there with a socket and long extension. Difficult but do able.
Mike
canuck Avatar
David Ross
Tampa, USA   usa
1978 MG MGB "New Baby"
1978 MG MGB V6 Conversion "New Baby"
1980 MG MGB "Green Grass Hopper"

Ditto X
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mac townsend Avatar
Fairfield, CA, USA   usa

now for the EZ trick.

when replacing the cylinder, thread the bottom (or top and bottom) holes in the mount. then use cap screws with no need for a nut. Doesn't make getting the hydraulic line connected any easier, but it does reduce the number of battles you need to win.<G>



1973 Roadster. A nice 50-footer!
SUs, Datsun 5-speed
MGB Tips and Tricks: www.mgrescue.com
twigworker Avatar
Jack Austin
Blowing Rock, NC, USA   usa

Actually all of the above posts are over simplifications. The truth is that it is a B**** and then you die.

Jack



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mheitt Avatar
michael heitt
Baltimore, USA   usa
1967 Jeep Commander "Jeepster Commando"
1976 MG MGB

Thanks, I finally figured it out by the time I checked the computer again.

In reply to a post by mac townsend when replacing the cylinder, thread the bottom (or top and bottom) holes in the mount. then use cap screws with no need for a nut. Doesn't make getting the hydraulic line connected any easier, but it does reduce the number of battles you need to win.<G>

I don't get it... what are cap screws?

Also, since I'm ordering a new master, should I just bite the bullet and buy the slave and tube? Is the slave easy to remove and replace?

Lastly, I've read about "bench bleeding" the master before installing. Is this necessary and if so, how is it done?
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underdog Avatar
Jim Underwood
Pittsburgh, USA   usa
1972 MG MGB
1980 Triumph TR8 "Fabulous Trashwagon"
1999 Chevrolet Corvette "Darth Vader"
1999 Chevrolet S10 "Spare Change"
2003 Jaguar S-Type "Eleanor"

This is another reason why I'm an advocate of doing all the hydraulics at once. With the brake and clutch lines all removed, the entire pedal box assembly can be unbolted after the pedals are dropped down. Then it's a very simple matter to replace both masters and you will be good...in my case... the rest of my life! Also a good time to check the bushes in the pedals and all the clevis pins ect.
mac townsend Avatar
Fairfield, CA, USA   usa

a cap screw is the technical name for a bolt without a nut. Technically it is not a bolt until it uses a nut.


In reply to a post by mheitt Thanks, I finally figured it out by the time I checked the computer again.

In reply to a post by mac townsend when replacing the cylinder, thread the bottom (or top and bottom) holes in the mount. then use cap screws with no need for a nut. Doesn't make getting the hydraulic line connected any easier, but it does reduce the number of battles you need to win.<G>

I don't get it... what are cap screws?

Also, since I'm ordering a new master, should I just bite the bullet and buy the slave and tube? Is the slave easy to remove and replace?

Lastly, I've read about "bench bleeding" the master before installing. Is this necessary and if so, how is it done?



1973 Roadster. A nice 50-footer!
SUs, Datsun 5-speed
MGB Tips and Tricks: www.mgrescue.com
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chris Avatar
Chris Roop
Pendleton, OR, USA   usa

True that but then you do more restorations than repairs, yes?

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dhartlein Avatar
Dave Hartlein
Suwanee, GA, USA   usa
1980 MG MGB
1991 Volvo 240

In reply to a post by underdog This is another reason why I'm an advocate of doing all the hydraulics at once. With the brake and clutch lines all removed, the entire pedal box assembly can be unbolted after the pedals are dropped down. Then it's a very simple matter to replace both masters and you will be good...in my case... the rest of my life! Also a good time to check the bushes in the pedals and all the clevis pins ect.

Jim - great to hear. I've got new masters for both plus a new clutch slave awaiting installation - all from Basil.
underdog Avatar
Jim Underwood
Pittsburgh, USA   usa
1972 MG MGB
1980 Triumph TR8 "Fabulous Trashwagon"
1999 Chevrolet Corvette "Darth Vader"
1999 Chevrolet S10 "Spare Change"
2003 Jaguar S-Type "Eleanor"

In reply to a post by chris True that but then you do more restorations than repairs, yes?


Not really. Only one I've completely restored is mine but I've repaired quite a few. Actually more money can be made fixing piece by piece over a period of time than doing the whole job at once. Most seem to think they are somehow saving money by having me fix each part as it fails instead of shelling out for a complete overhaul. Not really the case in the long run. I could see it if you are planning to dump the car soon but not for a "keeper". Sorta like the saying " you can pay me now or you can pay me later".
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