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Curing Paint in oven?

Posted by kgilliland1980 
kgilliland1980 Avatar
Kevin Gilliland
Fort Hood, TX, USA   usa
1971 MG MGB "Earl"

I was wondering if anyone has tried speeding up the curing process of "rattle can" spray paint by putting it in the oven?

If so: How did it turn out? What temp? How long?

I know it would have to be dried to the touch before going in, I just don't know how it would affect the curing process.

-Kevin
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mg6t8b Avatar
Cris D
Tracy CA, USA   usa
1968 MG MGB

Rattle can paint has catalysts/hardners desinged to help the drying process in normal temperatures. Putting this type of paint in an oven above normal outside temperatures (above 120 degrees approximately) will have a negative impact on paint usually bubbling and lifting of the paint. Paint that is made to be curred in an oven has different catalysts/hardners desinged for high temperatures. When I worked for Toyota, we baked the cars at 400 degrees F for about 40 minutes after prime and after top coat
Tim66 Avatar
Tim Burchfield
Toledo, Ohio, USA   usa

VHT caliper paint 200 degrees for 1 hour per can instructions. Worked great.

Tim
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mg6t8b Avatar
Cris D
Tracy CA, USA   usa
1968 MG MGB

Tim,

you are correct, there are some speciality paints designed for oven cure, brake, exhaust manifold, etc. My assumption was just basic hardware store "rattle can" paint
fasurveyor Avatar
Sean Kivler
Rock Hill, SC, USA   usa
1975 MG MGB "Fasurveyor"

As other's have stated... Depending what paint type you're talking about.

I bought Rustoleum 500 F paint. Painted my manifold exhaust pipes; then BBQ'd them on a closed grill. There were 3 different temps that they had to "cure" through for 30 minutes. Last was 700F. I reckon that paint ought to hold now... smiling smiley



The Red Baron
1975 MGB
18V797 w/ Dual SU HIF4
Manual Synchro 4spdLaycock "Blue Label" OD
Distributor: 45D4
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kgilliland1980 Avatar
Kevin Gilliland
Fort Hood, TX, USA   usa
1971 MG MGB "Earl"

I'll have to try that caliper paint out. I've use the VHT Flame-proof Header paint before, but it didn't say anything about baking it. It just said that it takes 7 days to cure.

I decided to go ahead and experiment. I put two things, on a piece of foil, in the oven at 250, for 30 minutes with mixed results. One thing was a piece with Krylon Rust Tough Primer and that turned out great. The other has potential. It was a pulley with Krylon Gloss Black enamel. For the most part it looks great! I can tell a noticeable improvement in the gloss, that thing is SHINING!

I learned two things though.

1) Do one side at a time. Even though it was dry to the touch, the bottom side stuck to the foil and left a make where I pulled it away. I figure if I paint and oven-cure one side at a time this won't happen.

2) Let it cool on the rack in the oven, maybe just pull the rack out. When I pulled it out using an oven-mitt, it was still a little tacky and pulled a small piece of paint away. (The primer didn't do this.) But now that it has cooled off, it seems to be both completely dried and hardened. I'll have to wait and see about the durability.

I guess there is a third also. I could just go buy that VHT Caliper paint that is made to go in the oven. Then I'll know it'll work the way I want it to.

-Kevin
BManBrian67 Avatar
Brian M
HB, California, USA   usa
1967 MG MGB MkI "MI MG"
2000 Porsche Boxster S "Got Box S"

Can I ask what you're trying to gain here?

Is there some need that has to be satisfied? A reason for the baking?

B
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kgilliland1980 Avatar
Kevin Gilliland
Fort Hood, TX, USA   usa
1971 MG MGB "Earl"

Not wanting to wait a week for the paint to cure if I can do it in an hour.

-Kevin
Gerry Avatar
Gerry Masterman
Prairieville, Louisiana, USA   usa

I do it often. 150 degrees for 30 minutes the turn oven off and let cool without touching. Electric oven. Used to keep an oven in my bluing shop just for this purpose. It was gas so you can use either but either one will stink as paint dries. Oh, learned the hard way about the oven vent on a gas oven-started my oven and forgot there was a can of foam in a can on top of the stove. 15 minutes later it exploded, sending the can THROUGH the cheal 5V tin roof and covering my stove with sticky crap that has no known solvent. Just glad I was not working closeby at the time or I'd probably still have the stick crap on me



Signature removed at Skye's request
tonegod Avatar
Jack Roy
Crozet, VA, USA   usa

I've had success with a different approach... After a full cleaning, I have baked a motorcycle part for 30mins at 250 giving it full time to heat all the metal and to reduce as much water vapor as possible... Then took the item out and sprayed it with rattlecan epoxy paint and have had good success in the past.... for your reasons, it did seem to cure a lot fast also... I did use a different can of spray once and it crinkled finished immediately...

Good luck
kgilliland1980 Avatar
Kevin Gilliland
Fort Hood, TX, USA   usa
1971 MG MGB "Earl"

In reply to a post by tonegod I've had success with a different approach... After a full cleaning, I have baked a motorcycle part for 30mins at 250 giving it full time to heat all the metal and to reduce as much water vapor as possible... Then took the item out and sprayed it with rattlecan epoxy paint and have had good success in the past.... for your reasons, it did seem to cure a lot fast also... I did use a different can of spray once and it crinkled finished immediately...

Good luck


So you painted it while it was still hot from the oven?
Gerry Avatar
Gerry Masterman
Prairieville, Louisiana, USA   usa

In reply to a post by kgilliland1980
In reply to a post by tonegod I've had success with a different approach... After a full cleaning, I have baked a motorcycle part for 30mins at 250 giving it full time to heat all the metal and to reduce as much water vapor as possible... Then took the item out and sprayed it with rattlecan epoxy paint and have had good success in the past.... for your reasons, it did seem to cure a lot fast also... I did use a different can of spray once and it crinkled finished immediately...

Good luck


So you painted it while it was still hot from the oven?

I've tried that and was not happy with the results. Paint would dry before it had a chance to lay down into a smooth coat. Left a dusty finish without much gloss. Success seems to depend on the brand/type of paint. I've used Duplicolor engine paint with ceramic on many, many aluminum packing strips by spraying, dry till no longer tacky then cook as mentioned above. Try to remove parts from the oven hot and the paint will still be soft



Signature removed at Skye's request
bernard lanigan
montgomery al, USA   usa
1976 MG MGB "The B"

Small items ive used a heat lamp.
kgilliland1980 Avatar
Kevin Gilliland
Fort Hood, TX, USA   usa
1971 MG MGB "Earl"

I am still in awe of how GLOSSY that pulley came out! I don't know how the heat caused it, but I like it! Maybe the heat melted the paint since it had not cured yet, and smoothed it out and brought out the shine in the paint.

I'm going to try a few different parts and few different techniques and see what works best. We'll see how it goes.
pooch2 Avatar
aussie 1968 MK 1
By the Beach, south coast NSW, Australia   aus

120 F is nothing.

About the same temp as out in the sun on a 70 F day.
tonegod Avatar
Jack Roy
Crozet, VA, USA   usa

I did this oil tank with the above method and was pretty pleased with the way it came out... After heating the part, I did let it cool a bit,,, but it was still hot to touch before painting... The paint goes on, kind of melts and then drys immediately... Really easy to put on many coats in a single session... It is kind of hard to tell from photos, but the finish came out nice a deep....


Gerry Avatar
Gerry Masterman
Prairieville, Louisiana, USA   usa

In reply to a post by tonegod I did this oil tank with the above method and was pretty pleased with the way it came out... After heating the part, I did let it cool a bit,,, but it was still hot to touch before painting... The paint goes on, kind of melts and then drys immediately... Really easy to put on many coats in a single session... It is kind of hard to tell from photos, but the finish came out nice a deep....


Almost looks like an old Triumph-what it it? More pics?



Signature removed at Skye's request
Gary E Avatar
Gary Edwards
Kernersville, ,N.C., USA   usa

I have used regular oil based brush on paint and baked it. It came out like it was powdered coated.
Paint the item and let it dry to the touch, about 12 hours is good, put it in a 150 degree oven for 2
hours and let cool in the oven.



Gary

If you don't think too good, don't think too much.


Bill Young Avatar
Kansas City, MO, USA   usa
1952 MG TD
1959 MG MGA 1500
1973 Lotus Europa
1973 MG Midget "Half Asp Or Frank"
1998 Jaguar XK8 Convertible

I have an electric oven in the shop just for this purpose. I usually pain the parts at room temp and then place in the oven at around 200 degrees for an hour and then let them cool off in the oven. Gloss is good and because they're out of the room air supply dust inclusions are reduced as well. It also keeps my finger prints out of the parts as I'm not touching them too early to see if they're dry yet. smiling smiley



Bill Young
'73 Midget
'59 MGA

There is a fine line between a 'hobby' and 'mental illness'.
tonegod Avatar
Jack Roy
Crozet, VA, USA   usa

Good eye Gerry... this is my triumph that I have been working on for quite a while.. Everytime I get rolling, I get distracted by buying a MG, or kids going into college.. anything that keeps me from throwing money at it... Last year I decided that I was going to just finish it.. paint it all myself, and then redo it later.. well that slowed down also with the addition of a 67 MGB to garage... But it is a first year Bonnie, 1959. My year!!! And belonged to my room mate in College back in the 70's!!! Talked him into letting me have it about 5 years ago in horrible chopper shape.. first pic... and the last pic is the shape it is in now... took lots of time to find all the one year only parts!!!



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